12

Given a columns' index, how can you get an Excel column name?

The problem is trickier than it sounds because it's not just base-26. The columns don't wrap over like normal digits would. Even the Microsoft Support Example doesn't scale beyond ZZZ.

Disclaimer: This is some code I had done a while back, and it came across my desktop again today. I thought it was worthy of posting here as a pre-answered question.

15 Answers 15

19

The answer I came up with is to get a little recursive. This code is in VB.Net:

Function ColumnName(ByVal index As Integer) As String
        Static chars() As Char = {"A"c, "B"c, "C"c, "D"c, "E"c, "F"c, "G"c, "H"c, "I"c, "J"c, "K"c, "L"c, "M"c, "N"c, "O"c, "P"c, "Q"c, "R"c, "S"c, "T"c, "U"c, "V"c, "W"c, "X"c, "Y"c, "Z"c}

        index -= 1 ''//adjust so it matches 0-indexed array rather than 1-indexed column

        Dim quotient As Integer = index \ 26 ''//normal / operator rounds. \ does integer division, which truncates
        If quotient > 0 Then
               ColumnName = ColumnName(quotient) & chars(index Mod 26)
        Else
               ColumnName = chars(index Mod 26)
        End If
End Function

And in C#:

string ColumnName(int index)
{
    index -= 1; //adjust so it matches 0-indexed array rather than 1-indexed column

    int quotient = index / 26;
    if (quotient > 0)
        return ColumnName(quotient) + chars[index % 26].ToString();
    else
        return chars[index % 26].ToString();
}
private char[] chars = new char[] {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O', 'P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T', 'U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Y', 'Z'};

The only downside it that it uses 1-indexed columns rather than 0-indexed.

  • +1 Nice solution, although I prefer where there ain't any array of letters, though this is the first thing I could think of before I was directed to this question. =) – Will Marcouiller Mar 2 '11 at 23:18
  • 1
    You can use (char)(index % 26 + 'A') instead of the char[] lookup – Rich Jan 9 '13 at 18:09
  • If you change char array to a string array, you'll increase the speed since you don't have to convert from char to string. Run your code to the max int and compare it with the string array and you'll see a difference. There are also other minor things to add to make it just a little bit faster too. Either which way this runs, it gets the job done. I just thought I'd mention that minor detail here. Great solution. – pqsk Mar 31 '15 at 20:46
18

Here's Joel's awesome code modified to work with zero-based column indexes and without the char array.

 Public Shared Function GetExcelColumn(ByVal index As Integer) As String

        Dim quotient As Integer = index \ 26 ''//Truncate 
        If quotient > 0 Then
            Return GetExcelColumn(quotient - 1) & Chr((index Mod 26) + 64).ToString

        Else
            Return Chr(index + 64).ToString

        End If

    End Function
  • 2
    Shouldn't it be + 65 instead of + 64? Value of index Mod 26 will vary from 0 to 25. 0 + 64 is @ character. – AppleGrew Aug 8 '12 at 14:41
  • 1
    I've translated this answer to python. I'll post it as a separate answer to get the pretty code formatting. so far, it's tested to work up to GetExcelByColumn(35) = 'AI' – Micah Stubbs Oct 24 '13 at 20:49
8

It's for this very reason that I avoid column names in programmed interface to Excel. Using column numbers works very well in Cell(r,c) references and R1C1 addressing.

EDIT: The Range function also takes cell references, as in Range(Cell(r1,c1),Cell(r2,c2)). Also, you can use the Address function to get the A1-style address of a cell or range.

EDIT2: Here's a VBA function that uses the Address() function to retrieve the column name:

Function colname(colindex)
    x = Cells(1, colindex).Address(False, False) ' get the range name (e.g. AB1)
    colname = Mid(x, 1, Len(x) - 1)              ' return all but last character
End Function
  • IIRC, you need names for the Range() function. But I don't remember the original context for this code, so I couldn't tell you how it was used for sure. – Joel Coehoorn Nov 18 '08 at 2:28
  • +1 I have tried it for my implementation of a Cell wrapper for a Range and it works great! Thanks! – Will Marcouiller Mar 2 '11 at 23:13
  • +1 Simplest and best method. – brettdj Oct 23 '12 at 0:04
4
# Python 2.x, no recursive function calls

def colname_from_colx(colx):
    assert colx >= 0
    colname = ''
    r = colx
    while 1:
        r, d = divmod(r, 26)
        colname = chr(d + ord('A')) + colname
        if not r:
            return colname
        r -= 1
4
public static String translateColumnIndexToName(int index) {
        //assert (index >= 0);

        int quotient = (index)/ 26;

        if (quotient > 0) {
            return translateColumnIndexToName(quotient-1) + (char) ((index % 26) + 65);
        } else {
            return "" + (char) ((index % 26) + 65);
        }


    }

and the test:

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
            System.out.println(i + ": " + translateColumnIndexToName(i));
}

here is the output:

0: A
1: B
2: C
3: D
4: E
5: F
6: G
7: H
8: I
9: J
10: K
11: L
12: M
13: N
14: O
15: P
16: Q
17: R
18: S
19: T
20: U
21: V
22: W
23: X
24: Y
25: Z
26: AA
27: AB
28: AC

I needed 0 based for POI

and translation from index to names:

public static int translateComunNameToIndex0(String columnName) {
        if (columnName == null) {
            return -1;
        }
        columnName = columnName.toUpperCase().trim();

        int colNo = -1;

        switch (columnName.length()) {
            case 1:
                colNo = (int) columnName.charAt(0) - 64;
                break;
            case 2:
                colNo = ((int) columnName.charAt(0) - 64) * 26 + ((int) columnName.charAt(1) - 64);
                break;
            default:
                //illegal argument exception
                throw new IllegalArgumentException(columnName);
        }

        return colNo;
    }
  • I tried your code translateColumnIndexToName and found out that the return translateColumnIndexToName(quotient-1) + (char) ((index % 26) + 65); line caused the first double letter series to display as "@A", "@B", "@C" using VS2010 and C# in a barely naked Console application. This is caused by the recursiveness, when we call the function again with quotient - 1, since I tested without the -1, it works flawlessly. Have you tested it without -1? – Will Marcouiller Mar 2 '11 at 23:07
3

This is an old post, but after seeing some of the solutions I came up with my own C# variation. 0-Based, without recursion:

public static String GetExcelColumnName(int columnIndex)
{
    if (columnIndex < 0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("columnIndex: " + columnIndex);
    }
    Stack<char> stack = new Stack<char>();
    while (columnIndex >= 0)
    {
        stack.Push((char)('A' + (columnIndex % 26)));
        columnIndex = (columnIndex / 26) - 1;
    }
    return new String(stack.ToArray());
}

Here are some test results at key transition points:

0: A
1: B
2: C
...
24: Y
25: Z
26: AA
27: AB
...
50: AY
51: AZ
52: BA
53: BB
...
700: ZY
701: ZZ
702: AAA
703: AAB
  • This wasn't requested in C# – brettdj Oct 23 '12 at 0:56
  • @brettdj - The question it tagged .NET (neither C# nor VB). There are answers in both languages. I do not see how my answer does not qualify? – dana Oct 23 '12 at 2:23
  • Does this work? The point of the question is that it's not just a simple % 26. – Joel Coehoorn Oct 23 '12 at 13:13
  • Yes it does work and I agree it is not as easy as it seems to figure out. If you notice I divide by 26 then subtract 1. I will update my answer with test results. – dana Oct 23 '12 at 15:52
1

The php version, thank's to this post to help me figure it out ! ^^

/**
 * Get excel column name
 * @param index : a column index we want to get the value in excel column format
 * @return (string) : excel column format
 */
function getexcelcolumnname($index) {
    //Get the quotient : if the index superior to base 26 max ?
    $quotient = $index / 26;
    if ($quotient >= 1) {
        //If yes, get top level column + the current column code
        return getexcelcolumnname($quotient-1). chr(($index % 26)+65);
    } else {
        //If no just return the current column code
        return chr(65 + $index);
    }
}
1

JavaScript Solution

/**
 * Calculate the column letter abbreviation from a 0 based index
 * @param {Number} value
 * @returns {string}
 */
getColumnFromIndex = function (value) {
    var base = 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ'.split('');
    value++;
    var remainder, result = "";
    do {
        remainder = value % 26;
        result = base[(remainder || 26) - 1] + result;
         value = Math.floor(value / 26);
    } while (value > 0);
    return result;
};
1

in python, with recursion. translated from Joey's answer. so far, it's tested to work up to GetExcelByColumn(35) = 'AI'

def GetExcelColumn(index):

    quotient = int(index / 26)

    if quotient > 0:
        return GetExcelColumn(quotient) + str(chr((index % 26) + 64))

    else:
        return str(chr(index + 64))
0

I enjoy writing recursive functions, but I don't think it's necessary here. This is my solution in VB. It works up to column ZZ. If someone can tell me if it works for AAA to ZZZ that would be nice to know.

Public Function TranslateColumnIndexToName(index As Integer) As String
'
Dim remainder As Integer
Dim remainder2 As Integer
Dim quotient As Integer
Dim quotient2 As Integer
'
quotient2 = ((index) / (26 * 26)) - 2
remainder2 = (index Mod (26 * 26)) - 1
quotient = ((remainder2) / 26) - 2
remainder = (index Mod 26) - 1
'
If quotient2 > 0 Then
    TranslateColumnIndexToName = ChrW(quotient2 + 65) & ChrW(quotient + 65) & ChrW(remainder + 65)
ElseIf quotient > 0 Then
    TranslateColumnIndexToName = ChrW(quotient + 65) & ChrW(remainder + 65)
Else
    TranslateColumnIndexToName = ChrW(remainder + 65)
End If 

End Function

  • 1
    It does not work beyond ZZ. – Joel Coehoorn Sep 21 '11 at 13:30
0

Here is my solution in C#

// test
void Main()
{

    for( var i = 0; i< 1000; i++ )
    {   var byte_array = code( i );
        Console.WriteLine("{0} | {1} | {2}", i, byte_array, offset(byte_array));
    }
}

// Converts an offset to AAA code
public string code( int offset )
{
    List<byte> byte_array = new List<byte>();
    while( offset >= 0 )
    {
        byte_array.Add( Convert.ToByte(65 + offset % 26) );
        offset = offset / 26 - 1;
    }
    return ASCIIEncoding.ASCII.GetString( byte_array.ToArray().Reverse().ToArray());
}

// Converts AAA code to an offset
public int offset( string code)
{
    var offset = 0;
    var byte_array = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes( code ).Reverse().ToArray();
    for( var i = 0; i < byte_array.Length; i++ )
    {
        offset += (byte_array[i] - 65 + 1) * Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(26.0, Convert.ToDouble(i)));
    }
    return offset - 1;
}
0

Here is my answer in C#, for translating both ways between column index and column name.

/// <summary>
/// Gets the name of a column given the index, as it would appear in Excel.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="columnIndex">The zero-based column index number.</param>
/// <returns>The name of the column.</returns>
/// <example>Column 0 = A, 26 = AA.</example>
public static string GetColumnName(int columnIndex)
{
    if (columnIndex < 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("columnIndex", "Column index cannot be negative.");

    var dividend = columnIndex + 1;
    var columnName = string.Empty;

    while (dividend > 0)
    {
        var modulo = (dividend - 1) % 26;
        columnName = Convert.ToChar(65 + modulo) + columnName;
        dividend = (dividend - modulo) / 26;
    }

    return columnName;
}

/// <summary>
/// Gets the zero-based column index given a column name.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="columnName">The column name.</param>
/// <returns>The index of the column.</returns>
public static int GetColumnIndex(string columnName)
{
    var index = 0;
    var total = 0;
    for (var i = columnName.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
        total += (columnName.ToUpperInvariant()[i] - 64) * (int)Math.Pow(26, index++);

    return total - 1;
}
0

In Ruby:

class Fixnum
  def col_name
    quot = self/26
    (quot>0 ? (quot-1).col_name : "") + (self%26+65).chr
  end
end

puts 0.col_name # => "A"
puts 51.col_name # => "AZ"
0

This JavaScript version shows that at its core it's a conversion to base 26:

function colName(x)
{
    x = (parseInt("ooooooop0", 26) + x).toString(26);
    return x.slice(x.indexOf('p') + 1).replace(/./g, function(c)
    {
        c = c.charCodeAt(0);
        return String.fromCharCode(c < 64 ? c + 17 : c - 22);
    });
}

The .toString(26) bit shows that Joel Coehoorn is wrong: it is a simple base conversion.

(Note: I have a more straight-forward implementation based on Dana's answer in production. It's less heavy, works for larger numbers although that won't affect me, but also doesn't show the mathematical principle as clearly.)

P.S. Here's the function evaluated at important points:

0 A
1 B
9 J
10 K
24 Y
25 Z
26 AA
27 AB
700 ZY
701 ZZ
702 AAA
703 AAB
18276 ZZY
18277 ZZZ
18278 AAAA
18279 AAAB
475252 ZZZY
475253 ZZZZ
475254 AAAAA
475255 AAAAB
12356628 ZZZZY
12356629 ZZZZZ
12356630 AAAAAA
12356631 AAAAAB
321272404 ZZZZZY
321272405 ZZZZZZ
321272406 AAAAAAA
321272407 AAAAAAB
8353082580 ZZZZZZY
8353082581 ZZZZZZZ
8353082582 AAAAAAAA
8353082583 AAAAAAAB
  • Image that 'A' is the 0 digit, B is the 1 digit, and 'Z' is the nine digit. In base 10 terms, base-26 would expect a sequence like 9, 10, 11. However, the base-26 digits map to Z, BA, BB instead of Z, AA, AB. Or, if 'Z' is the 0 digit and 'A' and 'B' are 1 and 2, and 'Y' is 9, we would expect 9, 10, 11. Instead, we see Y, AZ, AA. I'm not saying your javascript is wrong: just that there's more going on in your javascript than a simple base-26 conversion. – Joel Coehoorn Jun 16 '13 at 18:39
0

this is with Swift 4 :

@IBAction func printlaction(_ sender: Any) {
    let textN : Int = Int (number_textfield.text!)!
    reslut.text = String (printEXCL_Letter(index: textN))
}


func printEXCL_Letter(index : Int) -> String {

    let letters = ["a", "b", "c","d", "e", "f","g", "h", "i","j", "k", "l","m", "n", "o","p", "q", "r","s", "t", "u","v","w" ,"x", "y","z"]

    var index = index;
    index -= 1
    let index_div = index / 26

    if (index_div > 0){
        return printEXCL_Letter(index: index_div) + letters[index % 26];
    }
    else {
        return letters[index % 26]
    }
}

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