170

I have built a component in React which is supposed to update its own style on window scroll to create a parallax effect.

The component render method looks like this:

  function() {
    let style = { transform: 'translateY(0px)' };

    window.addEventListener('scroll', (event) => {
      let scrollTop = event.srcElement.body.scrollTop,
          itemTranslate = Math.min(0, scrollTop/3 - 60);

      style.transform = 'translateY(' + itemTranslate + 'px)');
    });

    return (
      <div style={style}></div>
    );
  }

This doesn't work because React doesn't know that the component has changed, and therefore the component is not rerendered.

I've tried storing the value of itemTranslate in the state of the component, and calling setState in the scroll callback. However, this makes scrolling unusable as this is terribly slow.

Any suggestion on how to do this?

1
  • 10
    Never bind an external event handler inside a render method. Rendering methods (and any other custom methods you call from render in the same thread) should only be concerned with logic pertaining to rendering/updating the actual DOM in React. Instead, as shown by @AustinGreco below, you should use the given React lifecycle methods to create and remove your event binding. This makes it self-contained inside the component and ensures no leaking by making sure the event binding is removed if/when the component that uses it is unmounted. – Mike Driver Apr 19 '15 at 11:55

16 Answers 16

262

You should bind the listener in componentDidMount, that way it's only created once. You should be able to store the style in state, the listener was probably the cause of performance issues.

Something like this:

componentDidMount: function() {
    window.addEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
},

componentWillUnmount: function() {
    window.removeEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
},

handleScroll: function(event) {
    let scrollTop = event.srcElement.body.scrollTop,
        itemTranslate = Math.min(0, scrollTop/3 - 60);

    this.setState({
      transform: itemTranslate
    });
},
11
  • 31
    I found that setState'ing inside scroll event for animation is choppy. I had to manually set the style of components using refs. – Ryan Rho May 13 '15 at 21:38
  • 2
    What would the "this" inside handleScroll be pointed to? In my case it is "window" not component. I ends up passing the component as a parameter – yuji May 13 '16 at 9:06
  • 10
    @yuji you can avoid needing to pass the component by binding this in the constructor: this.handleScroll = this.handleScroll.bind(this) will bind this within handleScroll to the component, instead of window. – Matt Parrilla Jul 21 '16 at 13:10
  • 1
    Note that srcElement is not available in Firefox. – Paulin Trognon Aug 6 '18 at 7:15
  • 4
    didn't work for me, but what did was setting scrollTop to event.target.scrollingElement.scrollTop – George Nov 14 '18 at 19:15
48

You can pass a function to the onScroll event on the React element: https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/events.html#ui-events

<ScrollableComponent
 onScroll={this.handleScroll}
/>

Another answer that is similar: https://stackoverflow.com/a/36207913/1255973

6
  • 5
    Is there any benefit/drawback to this method vs manually adding an event listener to the window element @AustinGreco mentioned? – Dennis Jan 2 '18 at 4:56
  • 2
    @Dennis One benefit is that you don't have to manually add/remove the event listeners. While this might be a simple example if you manually manage several event listeners all over your application it's easy to forget to properly remove them upon updates, which can lead to memory bugs. I would always use the built-in version if possible. – F Lekschas Feb 24 '19 at 22:03
  • 4
    It's worth noting that this attaches a scroll handler to the component itself, not to the window, which is a very different thing. @Dennis The benefits of onScroll are that it's more cross-browser and more performant. If you can use it you probably should, but it may not be useful in cases like the one for the OP – Beau Apr 12 '19 at 18:25
  • I can not get this above example to work at all. Can someone out there PLEASE provide me with a link to how to use React's onScroll synthetic event? – MadHatter Aug 21 '20 at 2:27
  • 1
    @youjin Some versions of IE and Safari on iOS can be a bit wonky with addEventListener as well as scrolling, and jQuery smooths a lot of that out for you (that's kinda the whole point of jQuery). Look at the browser support for both if you're curious. I'm not sure that jQuery is any more performant than vanilla js (in fact I'm sure it's not), but attaching a scroll handler to the element itself rather than the window is since the event won't have to bubble up through the DOM to be handled. There's always tradeoffs though.. – Beau Oct 22 '20 at 23:37
35

with hooks

import React, { useEffect, useState } from 'react';

function MyApp () {

  const [offset, setOffset] = useState(0);

  useEffect(() => {
    window.onscroll = () => {
      setOffset(window.pageYOffset)
    }
  }, []);

  console.log(offset); 
};
5
  • 1
    This is by far the most effective and elegant answer of all. Thanks for this. – Chigozie Orunta Apr 20 '20 at 19:54
  • 6
    If you go this route, be sure to use the cleanup function to remove the listener when the component unmounts. – bradleygriffith Oct 5 '20 at 18:45
  • This is what I was looking for! Thanks – Vaasu Dhand Apr 3 at 12:51
  • 1
    This isn't even using addEventListener and removeEventListener and has 30 upvotes. I wonder how many applications we have out there with memory leaks... As bradleygriffith said, use useEffect cleanup. – Rafael Tavares Apr 9 at 12:48
  • 3
    I'm not sure, but I don't think this would cause a memory leak because onscroll is there is only one onscroll on a window, whereas there can be many eventListeners. That's why in this case the cleanup function also wouldn't be necessary. However, please correct me if I'm wrong. Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/60745475/… – Joyce Lee Jun 9 at 23:40
25

My solution for making a responsive navbar ( position: 'relative' when not scrolling and fixed when scrolling and not at the top of the page)

componentDidMount() {
    window.addEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
}

componentWillUnmount() {
    window.removeEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
}
handleScroll(event) {
    if (window.scrollY === 0 && this.state.scrolling === true) {
        this.setState({scrolling: false});
    }
    else if (window.scrollY !== 0 && this.state.scrolling !== true) {
        this.setState({scrolling: true});
    }
}
    <Navbar
            style={{color: '#06DCD6', borderWidth: 0, position: this.state.scrolling ? 'fixed' : 'relative', top: 0, width: '100vw', zIndex: 1}}
        >

No performance issues for me.

3
  • You can also use a fake header which essentially is just a placeholder. So you've got your fixed header and underneath it you've got your placeholder fakeheader with position:relative. – robins_ Jan 25 '18 at 12:37
  • No performance issues because this does not address the parallax challenge in the question. – juanitogan Sep 14 '18 at 21:12
  • how can this even work? "this" is not in its scope.. – Stefan Avramovic Oct 24 '20 at 20:44
21

to help out anyone here who noticed the laggy behavior / performance issues when using Austins answer, and wants an example using the refs mentioned in the comments, here is an example I was using for toggling a class for a scroll up / down icon:

In the render method:

<i ref={(ref) => this.scrollIcon = ref} className="fa fa-2x fa-chevron-down"></i>

In the handler method:

if (this.scrollIcon !== null) {
  if(($(document).scrollTop() + $(window).height() / 2) > ($('body').height() / 2)){
    $(this.scrollIcon).attr('class', 'fa fa-2x fa-chevron-up');
  }else{
    $(this.scrollIcon).attr('class', 'fa fa-2x fa-chevron-down');
  }
}

And add / remove your handlers the same way as Austin mentioned:

componentDidMount(){
  window.addEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
},
componentWillUnmount(){
  window.removeEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
},

docs on the refs.

4
  • 4
    You saved my day! For updating, you actually don't need to use jquery to modify the classname at this point, because it is already a native DOM element. So you could simply do this.scrollIcon.className = whatever-you-want. – southp Mar 9 '16 at 8:59
  • 2
    this solution breaks React encapsulation although I'm still not sure of a way around this without laggy behavior - maybe a debounced scroll event (at maybe 200-250 ms) would be a solution here – Jordan Jun 9 '16 at 21:27
  • nope debounced scroll event only helps make scrolling smoother (in a non-blocking sense), but it takes 500ms to a second for the updates to state to apply in the DOM :/ – Jordan Jun 9 '16 at 21:45
  • I used this solution as well, +1. I agree you don't need jQuery: just use className or classList. Also, I did not need window.addEventListener(): I just used React's onScroll, and it's as fast, as long as you don't update props/state! – BenMorel Sep 27 '19 at 16:12
18

I found that I can't successfully add the event listener unless I pass true like so:

componentDidMount = () => {
    window.addEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll, true);
},
2
  • It's working. But can you figure it why we have to pass true boolean to this listener. – shah chaitanya Feb 12 '19 at 12:19
  • 2
    From w3schools: [w3schools.com/jsref/met_document_addeventlistener.asp] userCapture: Optional. A Boolean value that specifies whether the event should be executed in the capturing or in the bubbling phase. Possible values: true - The event handler is executed in the capturing phase false- Default. The event handler is executed in the bubbling phase – Jean-Marie Dalmasso Feb 13 '19 at 13:20
17

An example using classNames, React hooks useEffect, useState and styled-jsx:

import classNames from 'classnames'
import { useEffect, useState } from 'react'

const Header = _ => {
  const [ scrolled, setScrolled ] = useState()
  const classes = classNames('header', {
    scrolled: scrolled,
  })
  useEffect(_ => {
    const handleScroll = _ => { 
      if (window.pageYOffset > 1) {
        setScrolled(true)
      } else {
        setScrolled(false)
      }
    }
    window.addEventListener('scroll', handleScroll)
    return _ => {
      window.removeEventListener('scroll', handleScroll)
    }
  }, [])
  return (
    <header className={classes}>
      <h1>Your website</h1>
      <style jsx>{`
        .header {
          transition: background-color .2s;
        }
        .header.scrolled {
          background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, .1);
        }
      `}</style>
    </header>
  )
}
export default Header
0
10

Function component example using useEffect:

Note: You need to remove the event listener by returning a "clean up" function in useEffect. If you don't, every time the component updates you will have an additional window scroll listener.

import React, { useState, useEffect } from "react"

const ScrollingElement = () => {
  const [scrollY, setScrollY] = useState(0);

  function logit() {
    setScrollY(window.pageYOffset);
  }

  useEffect(() => {
    function watchScroll() {
      window.addEventListener("scroll", logit);
    }
    watchScroll();
    // Remove listener (like componentWillUnmount)
    return () => {
      window.removeEventListener("scroll", logit);
    };
  }, []);

  return (
    <div className="App">
      <div className="fixed-center">Scroll position: {scrollY}px</div>
    </div>
  );
}
0
7

If what you're interested in is a child component that's scrolling, then this example might be of help: https://codepen.io/JohnReynolds57/pen/NLNOyO?editors=0011

class ScrollAwareDiv extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.myRef = React.createRef()
    this.state = {scrollTop: 0}
  }

  onScroll = () => {
     const scrollTop = this.myRef.current.scrollTop
     console.log(`myRef.scrollTop: ${scrollTop}`)
     this.setState({
        scrollTop: scrollTop
     })
  }

  render() {
    const {
      scrollTop
    } = this.state
    return (
      <div
         ref={this.myRef}
         onScroll={this.onScroll}
         style={{
           border: '1px solid black',
           width: '600px',
           height: '100px',
           overflow: 'scroll',
         }} >
        <p>This demonstrates how to get the scrollTop position within a scrollable 
           react component.</p>
        <p>ScrollTop is {scrollTop}</p>
     </div>
    )
  }
}
5

Update for an answer with React Hooks

These are two hooks - one for direction(up/down/none) and one for the actual position

Use like this:

useScrollPosition(position => {
    console.log(position)
  })

useScrollDirection(direction => {
    console.log(direction)
  })

Here are the hooks:

import { useState, useEffect } from "react"

export const SCROLL_DIRECTION_DOWN = "SCROLL_DIRECTION_DOWN"
export const SCROLL_DIRECTION_UP = "SCROLL_DIRECTION_UP"
export const SCROLL_DIRECTION_NONE = "SCROLL_DIRECTION_NONE"

export const useScrollDirection = callback => {
  const [lastYPosition, setLastYPosition] = useState(window.pageYOffset)
  const [timer, setTimer] = useState(null)

  const handleScroll = () => {
    if (timer !== null) {
      clearTimeout(timer)
    }
    setTimer(
      setTimeout(function () {
        callback(SCROLL_DIRECTION_NONE)
      }, 150)
    )
    if (window.pageYOffset === lastYPosition) return SCROLL_DIRECTION_NONE

    const direction = (() => {
      return lastYPosition < window.pageYOffset
        ? SCROLL_DIRECTION_DOWN
        : SCROLL_DIRECTION_UP
    })()

    callback(direction)
    setLastYPosition(window.pageYOffset)
  }

  useEffect(() => {
    window.addEventListener("scroll", handleScroll)
    return () => window.removeEventListener("scroll", handleScroll)
  })
}

export const useScrollPosition = callback => {
  const handleScroll = () => {
    callback(window.pageYOffset)
  }

  useEffect(() => {
    window.addEventListener("scroll", handleScroll)
    return () => window.removeEventListener("scroll", handleScroll)
  })
}
4

My bet here is using Function components with new hooks to solve it, but instead of using useEffect like in previous answers, I think the correct option would be useLayoutEffect for an important reason:

The signature is identical to useEffect, but it fires synchronously after all DOM mutations.

This can be found in React documentation. If we use useEffect instead and we reload the page already scrolled, scrolled will be false and our class will not be applied, causing an unwanted behavior.

An example:

import React, { useState, useLayoutEffect } from "react"

const Mycomponent = (props) => {
  const [scrolled, setScrolled] = useState(false)

  useLayoutEffect(() => {
    const handleScroll = e => {
      setScrolled(window.scrollY > 0)
    }

    window.addEventListener("scroll", handleScroll)

    return () => {
      window.removeEventListener("scroll", handleScroll)
    }
  }, [])

  ...

  return (
    <div className={scrolled ? "myComponent--scrolled" : ""}>
       ...
    </div>
  )
}

A possible solution to the problem could be https://codepen.io/dcalderon/pen/mdJzOYq

const Item = (props) => { 
  const [scrollY, setScrollY] = React.useState(0)

  React.useLayoutEffect(() => {
    const handleScroll = e => {
      setScrollY(window.scrollY)
    }

    window.addEventListener("scroll", handleScroll)

    return () => {
      window.removeEventListener("scroll", handleScroll)
    }
  }, [])

  return (
    <div class="item" style={{'--scrollY': `${Math.min(0, scrollY/3 - 60)}px`}}>
      Item
    </div>
  )
}
5
  • I'm curious about the useLayoutEffect. I'm trying to see what you've mentioned. – giovannipds Mar 24 '20 at 3:40
  • If you don't mind, could you please provide a repo + visual example of this happening? I just couldn't reproduce what you've mentioned as an issue of useEffect here in comparison to useLayoutEffect. – giovannipds Mar 24 '20 at 5:01
  • Sure! https://github.com/calderon/uselayout-vs-uselayouteffect. This happened to me just yesterday with a similar behavior. BTW, I'm a react newbie and possibly I'm totally wrong :D :D – Calderón Mar 24 '20 at 13:26
  • Actually I've been trying this many times, reloading a lot, and sometimes it appears header in red instead of blue, which means it is applying .Header--scrolled class sometimes, but a 100% times .Header--scrolledLayout is applied correctly thanks useLayoutEffect. – Calderón Mar 24 '20 at 14:02
  • I moved repo to github.com/calderon/useeffect-vs-uselayouteffect – Calderón Mar 25 '20 at 9:51
3

Here is another example using HOOKS fontAwesomeIcon and Kendo UI React
[![screenshot here][1]][1]

import { FontAwesomeIcon } from '@fortawesome/react-fontawesome';


const ScrollBackToTop = () => {
  const [show, handleShow] = useState(false);

  useEffect(() => {
    window.addEventListener('scroll', () => {
      if (window.scrollY > 1200) {
        handleShow(true);
      } else handleShow(false);
    });
    return () => {
      window.removeEventListener('scroll');
    };
  }, []);

  const backToTop = () => {
    window.scroll({ top: 0, behavior: 'smooth' });
  };

  return (
    <div>
      {show && (
      <div className="backToTop text-center">
        <button className="backToTop-btn k-button " onClick={() => backToTop()} >
          <div className="d-none d-xl-block mr-1">Top</div>
          <FontAwesomeIcon icon="chevron-up"/>
        </button>
      </div>
      )}
    </div>
  );
};

export default ScrollBackToTop;```


  [1]: https://i.stack.imgur.com/ZquHI.png
1
  • This is awesome. I had a problem in my useEffect() changing my navbar sticky's state on scroll using window.onscroll()... found out through this answer that window.addEventListener() and window.removeEventListener() are the right approach for controlling my sticky navbar with a functional component... thanks! – Michael Jun 30 '20 at 6:25
1

I solved the problem via using and modifying CSS variables. This way I do not have to modify the component state which causes performance issues.

index.css

:root {
  --navbar-background-color: rgba(95,108,255,1);
}

Navbar.jsx

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import styles from './Navbar.module.css';

class Navbar extends Component {

    documentStyle = document.documentElement.style;
    initalNavbarBackgroundColor = 'rgba(95, 108, 255, 1)';
    scrolledNavbarBackgroundColor = 'rgba(95, 108, 255, .7)';

    handleScroll = () => {
        if (window.scrollY === 0) {
            this.documentStyle.setProperty('--navbar-background-color', this.initalNavbarBackgroundColor);
        } else {
            this.documentStyle.setProperty('--navbar-background-color', this.scrolledNavbarBackgroundColor);
        }
    }

    componentDidMount() {
        window.addEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
    }

    componentWillUnmount() {
        window.removeEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
    }

    render () {
        return (
            <nav className={styles.Navbar}>
                <a href="/">Home</a>
                <a href="#about">About</a>
            </nav>
        );
    }
};

export default Navbar;

Navbar.module.css

.Navbar {
    background: var(--navbar-background-color);
}
1
constructor() {
    super()
      this.state = {
        change: false
      }
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    window.addEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
    console.log('add event');
  }

  componentWillUnmount() {
    window.removeEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
    console.log('remove event');
  }

  handleScroll = e => {
    if (window.scrollY === 0) {
      this.setState({ change: false });
    } else if (window.scrollY > 0 ) {
      this.setState({ change: true });
    }
  }

render() { return ( <div className="main" style={{ boxShadow: this.state.change ? 0px 6px 12px rgba(3,109,136,0.14):none}} ></div>

This is how I did it and works perfect.

0

To expand on @Austin's answer, you should add this.handleScroll = this.handleScroll.bind(this) to your constructor:

constructor(props){
    this.handleScroll = this.handleScroll.bind(this)
}
componentDidMount: function() {
    window.addEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
},

componentWillUnmount: function() {
    window.removeEventListener('scroll', this.handleScroll);
},

handleScroll: function(event) {
    let scrollTop = event.srcElement.body.scrollTop,
        itemTranslate = Math.min(0, scrollTop/3 - 60);

    this.setState({
      transform: itemTranslate
    });
},
...

This gives handleScroll() access to the proper scope when called from the event listener.

Also be aware you cannot do the .bind(this) in the addEventListener or removeEventListener methods because they will each return references to different functions and the event will not be removed when the component unmounts.

0

If you find the above answers not working for you, try this:

React.useEffect(() => {
    document.addEventListener('wheel', yourCallbackHere)
    return () => {
        document.removeEventListener('wheel', handleTooltipClose)
    }
}, [yourCallbackHere])

Basically, you need to try document instead of window, and wheel instead of scroll.

Happy coding!

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