1

I'm trying to fill my vector:

...    
auto f = std::bind(&ScheduledExecutor::complete_after, std::placeholders::_1, std::placeholders::_2);
threadPoolVector.push_back(std::thread(f, this, delay));
...

How can I detach adding thread before push it to the vector?

3

Do not detach them. You can use std::shared_ptr for threads in vector:

std::vector<std::shared_ptr<std::thread>> threadPoolVector;
....
auto f = std::bind(&ScheduledExecutor::complete_after, std::placeholders::_1, std::placeholders::_2);
threadPoolVector.push_back(std::make_shared<std::thread>(f, this, delay));

If for some reason you can't use shared pointer, you can use emplace_back() vector method for move your thread to vector:

std::vector<std::thread> threadPoolVector;
...
auto f = std::bind(&ScheduledExecutor::complete_after, std::placeholders::_1, std::placeholders::_2);
threadPoolVector.emplace_back(f, this, delay);
  • But I need to detach them before adding. I have to joing them in destructor of my class. – user3818229 Apr 19 '15 at 13:40
  • 1
    If you call join, you should not detach them. detach() called when you can't call join(). – gomons Apr 19 '15 at 13:41
  • Can you explain, why you want detach thread? – gomons Apr 19 '15 at 13:45
  • @gomos I wanna run the function compelte_after in new thread. But this function is a private function in my class. So, if I didn't join to the tempThreads, destructor called before all tempThreads are completed. – user3818229 Apr 19 '15 at 13:51
  • 1
    @user3818229, I recommend you use shared pointer for store thread objects in vector. When you add thread in shred pointer, the object instance not deleted, only pointer instance. So you do not need detach thread, just call threadPoolVector.at(threadIndex)->join() in destructor of your class. – gomons Apr 19 '15 at 13:55
5

Using C++11 or higher you can take advantage of move semantics. It is better to avoid using pointers, even smart, when they are not absolutely necessary.

You can create std::thread object and move it with std::move function:

std::vector<std::thread> pool;
std::thread th(f);
pool.push_back(std::move(th));

You can also use std::vector::emplace_back function to create object of std::thread directly in std::vector instance.

Then you can join or detach them using for:

for (auto& t : pool)
    t.detach(); // or t.join() to join it

or accessing each element using std::vector::at or std::vector::operator[] functions.

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