29
def GaussianMatrix(X,sigma):
    row,col=X.shape
    GassMatrix=np.zeros(shape=(row,row))
    X=np.asarray(X)
    i=0
    for v_i in X:
        j=0
        for v_j in X:
            GassMatrix[i,j]=Gaussian(v_i.T,v_j.T,sigma)
            j+=1
        i+=1
    return GassMatrix
def Gaussian(x,z,sigma):
    return np.exp((-(np.linalg.norm(x-z)**2))/(2*sigma**2))

This is my current way. Is there any way I can use matrix operation to do this? X is the data points.

10 Answers 10

30
0

Do you want to use the Gaussian kernel for e.g. image smoothing? If so, there's a function gaussian_filter() in scipy:

Updated answer

This should work - while it's still not 100% accurate, it attempts to account for the probability mass within each cell of the grid. I think that using the probability density at the midpoint of each cell is slightly less accurate, especially for small kernels. See https://homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/rbf/HIPR2/gsmooth.htm for an example.

import numpy as np
import scipy.stats as st

def gkern(kernlen=21, nsig=3):
    """Returns a 2D Gaussian kernel."""

    x = np.linspace(-nsig, nsig, kernlen+1)
    kern1d = np.diff(st.norm.cdf(x))
    kern2d = np.outer(kern1d, kern1d)
    return kern2d/kern2d.sum()

Testing it on the example in Figure 3 from the link:

gkern(5, 2.5)*273

gives

array([[ 1.0278445 ,  4.10018648,  6.49510362,  4.10018648,  1.0278445 ],
       [ 4.10018648, 16.35610171, 25.90969361, 16.35610171,  4.10018648],
       [ 6.49510362, 25.90969361, 41.0435344 , 25.90969361,  6.49510362],
       [ 4.10018648, 16.35610171, 25.90969361, 16.35610171,  4.10018648],
       [ 1.0278445 ,  4.10018648,  6.49510362,  4.10018648,  1.0278445 ]])

The original (accepted) answer below accepted is wrong The square root is unnecessary, and the definition of the interval is incorrect.

import numpy as np
import scipy.stats as st

def gkern(kernlen=21, nsig=3):
    """Returns a 2D Gaussian kernel array."""

    interval = (2*nsig+1.)/(kernlen)
    x = np.linspace(-nsig-interval/2., nsig+interval/2., kernlen+1)
    kern1d = np.diff(st.norm.cdf(x))
    kernel_raw = np.sqrt(np.outer(kern1d, kern1d))
    kernel = kernel_raw/kernel_raw.sum()
    return kernel
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Why do you take the square root of the outer product (i.e. kernel_raw = np.sqrt(np.outer(kern1d, kern1d))) and don't just multiply them? I feel like I am missing something here.. – trueter Apr 24 '17 at 12:43
  • could you give some details, please, about how your function works ? Why do you need np.diff(st.norm.cdf(x)) ? – Ciprian Tomoiagă Feb 13 '18 at 13:42
  • 2
    also, your implementation gives results that are different from anyone else's on the page :( – Ciprian Tomoiagă Feb 13 '18 at 14:02
  • @CiprianTomoiagă, returning to this answer after a long time, and you're right, this answer is wrong :(. The square root should not be there, and I have also defined the interval inconsistently with how most people would understand it. I'll update this answer. – FuzzyDuck Mar 24 '19 at 22:29
  • 1
    The nsig (standard deviation) argument in the edited answer is no longer used in this function. Please edit the answer to provide a correct response or remove it, as it is currently tricking users for this rather common procedure. – TomNorway Jul 11 '19 at 15:41
21
0

I myself used the accepted answer for my image processing, but I find it (and the other answers) too dependent on other modules. Therefore, here is my compact solution:

import numpy as np

def gkern(l=5, sig=1.):
    """\
    creates gaussian kernel with side length l and a sigma of sig
    """

    ax = np.linspace(-(l - 1) / 2., (l - 1) / 2., l)
    xx, yy = np.meshgrid(ax, ax)

    kernel = np.exp(-0.5 * (np.square(xx) + np.square(yy)) / np.square(sig))

    return kernel / np.sum(kernel)

Edit: Changed arange to linspace to handle even side lengths

| improve this answer | |
20
1

I'm trying to improve on FuzzyDuck's answer here. I think this approach is shorter and easier to understand. Here I'm using signal.scipy.gaussian to get the 2D gaussian kernel.

import numpy as np
from scipy import signal

def gkern(kernlen=21, std=3):
    """Returns a 2D Gaussian kernel array."""
    gkern1d = signal.gaussian(kernlen, std=std).reshape(kernlen, 1)
    gkern2d = np.outer(gkern1d, gkern1d)
    return gkern2d

Plotting it using matplotlib.pyplot:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
plt.imshow(gkern(21), interpolation='none')

Gaussian kernel plotted using matplotlib

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Your answer is easily the fastest that I have found, even when employing numba on a variation of @rth's answer. In addition I suggest removing the reshape and adding a optional normalisation step. Modified code here. – TomNorway Jul 11 '19 at 16:34
19
0

You may simply gaussian-filter a simple 2D dirac function, the result is then the filter function that was being used:

import numpy as np
import scipy.ndimage.filters as fi

def gkern2(kernlen=21, nsig=3):
    """Returns a 2D Gaussian kernel array."""

    # create nxn zeros
    inp = np.zeros((kernlen, kernlen))
    # set element at the middle to one, a dirac delta
    inp[kernlen//2, kernlen//2] = 1
    # gaussian-smooth the dirac, resulting in a gaussian filter mask
    return fi.gaussian_filter(inp, nsig)
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    I don't know the implementation details of the gaussian_filter function, but this method doesn't result in a 2D gaussian. Plot the central slice of gkern2(21, 7) logarithmically and you'll see it isn't a parabola. – clemisch Apr 17 '18 at 10:21
4
0

A 2D gaussian kernel matrix can be computed with numpy broadcasting,

def gaussian_kernel(size=21, sigma=3):
    """Returns a 2D Gaussian kernel.
    Parameters
    ----------
    size : float, the kernel size (will be square)

    sigma : float, the sigma Gaussian parameter

    Returns
    -------
    out : array, shape = (size, size)
      an array with the centered gaussian kernel
    """
    x = np.linspace(- (size // 2), size // 2)
    x /= np.sqrt(2)*sigma
    x2 = x**2
    kernel = np.exp(- x2[:, None] - x2[None, :])
    return kernel / kernel.sum()

For small kernel sizes this should be reasonably fast.

Note: this makes changing the sigma parameter easier with respect to the accepted answer.

| improve this answer | |
  • I think you meant np.linspace(-(size // 2), size // 2). Otherwise, the interval is a bit longer on the left side of zero (because (-21) // 2 = -11, whereas 21 // 2 = 10. – Ciprian Tomoiagă Feb 14 '18 at 13:17
  • @CiprianTomoiagă Thanks, fixed. – rth Feb 14 '18 at 13:49
  • 1
    It gives an array with shape (50, 50) every time due to your use of linspace. – clemisch Apr 17 '18 at 10:23
  • 1
    I beleive it must be x = np.linspace(- (size // 2), size // 2, size) – Ludovic C Sep 29 '18 at 1:39
4
0

I tried using numpy only. Here is the code

def get_gauss_kernel(size=3,sigma=1):
    center=(int)(size/2)
    kernel=np.zeros((size,size))
    for i in range(size):
       for j in range(size):
          diff=np.sqrt((i-center)**2+(j-center)**2)
          kernel[i,j]=np.exp(-(diff**2)/(2*sigma**2))
    return kernel/np.sum(kernel)

You can visualise the result using:

plt.imshow(get_gauss_kernel(5,1))

Here is the output

| improve this answer | |
  • Hi Saruj, This is great and I have just stolen it. Works beautifully. One edit though: the "2*sigma**2" needs to be in parentheses, so that the sigma is on the denominator. That makes sure the gaussian gets wider when you increase sigma. I've proposed the edit. – Eureka Mar 31 '19 at 20:38
  • 1
    Hi, Eureka. Thanks for the suggestion :) – Suraj Singh Apr 5 '19 at 8:13
3
0

linalg.norm takes an axis parameter. With a little experimentation I found I could calculate the norm for all combinations of rows with

np.linalg.norm(x[None,:,:]-x[:,None,:],axis=2)

It expands x into a 3d array of all differences, and takes the norm on the last dimension.

So I can apply this to your code by adding the axis parameter to your Gaussian:

def Gaussian(x,z,sigma,axis=None):
    return np.exp((-(np.linalg.norm(x-z, axis=axis)**2))/(2*sigma**2))

x=np.arange(12).reshape(3,4)
GaussianMatrix(x,1)

produces

array([[  1.00000000e+00,   1.26641655e-14,   2.57220937e-56],
       [  1.26641655e-14,   1.00000000e+00,   1.26641655e-14],
       [  2.57220937e-56,   1.26641655e-14,   1.00000000e+00]])

Matching:

Gaussian(x[None,:,:],x[:,None,:],1,axis=2)

array([[  1.00000000e+00,   1.26641655e-14,   2.57220937e-56],
       [  1.26641655e-14,   1.00000000e+00,   1.26641655e-14],
       [  2.57220937e-56,   1.26641655e-14,   1.00000000e+00]])
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    How do you specify the value for Sigma? – Rojin Feb 21 '16 at 4:11
3
0

Building up on Teddy Hartanto's answer. You can just calculate your own one dimensional Gaussian functions and then use np.outer to calculate the two dimensional one. Very fast and efficient way.

With the code below you can also use different Sigmas for every dimension

import numpy as np
def generate_gaussian_mask(shape, sigma, sigma_y=None):
    if sigma_y==None:
        sigma_y=sigma
    rows, cols = shape

    def get_gaussian_fct(size, sigma):
        fct_gaus_x = np.linspace(0,size,size)
        fct_gaus_x = fct_gaus_x-size/2
        fct_gaus_x = fct_gaus_x**2
        fct_gaus_x = fct_gaus_x/(2*sigma**2)
        fct_gaus_x = np.exp(-fct_gaus_x)
        return fct_gaus_x

    mask = np.outer(get_gaussian_fct(rows,sigma), get_gaussian_fct(cols,sigma_y))
    return mask
| improve this answer | |
2
0

If you are a computer vision engineer and you need heatmap for a particular point as Gaussian distribution(especially for keypoint detection on image)

def gaussian_heatmap(center = (2, 2), image_size = (10, 10), sig = 1):
    """
    It produces single gaussian at expected center
    :param center:  the mean position (X, Y) - where high value expected
    :param image_size: The total image size (width, height)
    :param sig: The sigma value
    :return:
    """
    x_axis = np.linspace(0, image_size[0]-1, image_size[0]) - center[0]
    y_axis = np.linspace(0, image_size[1]-1, image_size[1]) - center[1]
    xx, yy = np.meshgrid(x_axis, y_axis)
    kernel = np.exp(-0.5 * (np.square(xx) + np.square(yy)) / np.square(sig))
    return kernel

The usage and output

kernel = gaussian_heatmap(center = (2, 2), image_size = (10, 10), sig = 1)
plt.imshow(kernel)
print("max at :", np.unravel_index(kernel.argmax(), kernel.shape))
print("kernel shape", kernel.shape)

max at : (2, 2)

kernel shape (10, 10)

Gaussian distribution at mean (2,2) and sigma 1.0

kernel = gaussian_heatmap(center = (25, 40), image_size = (100, 50), sig = 5)
plt.imshow(kernel)
print("max at :", np.unravel_index(kernel.argmax(), kernel.shape))
print("kernel shape", kernel.shape)

max at : (40, 25)

kernel shape (50, 100)

Gaussian distribution mean at

| improve this answer | |
0
0

As I didn't find what I was looking for, I coded my own one-liner. You can modify it accordingly (according to the dimensions and the standard deviation).

Here is the one-liner function for a 3x5 patch for example.

from scipy import signal

def gaussian2D(patchHeight, patchWidth, stdHeight=1, stdWidth=1):
    gaussianWindow = signal.gaussian(patchHeight, stdHeight).reshape(-1, 1)@signal.gaussian(patchWidth, stdWidth).reshape(1, -1)
    return gaussianWindow

print(gaussian2D(3, 5))

You get an output like this:

[[0.082085   0.36787944 0.60653066 0.36787944 0.082085  ]
[0.13533528  0.60653066 1.         0.60653066 0.13533528]
[0.082085   0.36787944 0.60653066 0.36787944 0.082085  ]]

You can read more about scipy's Gaussian here.

| improve this answer | |

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