17

For some reason the value of this is being lost in react event handler. Reading the docs I thought that react did some stuff here to make sure this was set to the correct value

The following doesn't work as I'd expect

import React from 'react';

export default class Observer extends React.Component {

    handleClick() {
        console.log(this); //logs undefined
    }
    render() {
        return (
            <button onClick={this.handleClick}>Click</button>
        );
    }
}

But this does:

import React from 'react';

export default class Observer extends React.Component {

    handleClick() {
        console.log(this); //logs Observer class instance
    }
    render() {
        return (
            <button onClick={this.handleClick.bind(this)}>Click</button>
        );
    }
}

React and ES6 is new to me but this seems to not be the correct behaviour?

  • Why wouldn't it be correct behaviour? Does jsx obscure the function you are creating for onClick too much? – Bergi Apr 19 '15 at 15:53
  • This has nothing to do with ES6. It wouldn't work in ES5 either. – Bergi Apr 19 '15 at 15:53
  • @Bergi Accepted answer says otherwise. In ES5 you would be using React.createClass and you wouldn't manually have to bind. So yes, this has everything to do with the OP using ES6 to create React components. – Stijn de Witt Oct 3 '15 at 11:09
  • @StijndeWitt: That's frame-work specific, of course. One could write a (failing) ES5 constructor that would be equivalent to the ES6 class without React.createClass, and one could still use React.createClass in ES6. – Bergi Oct 3 '15 at 18:53
  • @Bergi Yes, but this exact issue is mentioned by Facebook itself as one of the things to pay attention to when converting from React ES5 to React ES6 so to say it has nothing to do with ES6 is just weird. Also, yes it's framework specific, but this question is tagged reactjs and react-jsx for a reason. The question is framework specific. Last, Facebook recommends React.createClass only for ES5 and explicitly recommends against it's use for ES6. – Stijn de Witt Oct 3 '15 at 19:48
28

This is correct behavior for JavaScript and React if you use the new class syntax.

The autobinding feature does not apply to ES6 classes in v0.13.0.

So you'll need to use:

 <button onClick={this.handleClick.bind(this)}>Click</button>

Or one of the other tricks:

export default class Observer extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.handleClick = this.handleClick.bind(this);
  }
  handleClick() {
    /* ... */
  }
  render() {
      return <button onClick={this.handleClick}>Click</button>
  }
}
  • Edited your answer to clarify that autobinding continues to work with React.createClass in all versions of React. – Sophie Alpert Apr 19 '15 at 16:35
  • Thanks for the clarification Ben. – WiredPrairie Apr 19 '15 at 16:52
  • 1
    Note that in the docs you link to also give another solution using ES7 class properties to create arrow function handlers, ex handleClick = (e) => { }, then no bind call is needed in the constructor or anywhere. – Aaron Apr 1 '16 at 16:00
14

The accepted answer is good and I've used it a lot in ES6, but I just want to add another "more modern" solution we have with ES7 (mentioned in the React component class auto-binding notes): use arrow functions as class properties, then you don't need to bind or wrap your handler anywhere.

export default class Observer extends React.Component {
  handleClick = (e) => {
    /* ... */
  }
  render() {
      return <button onClick={this.handleClick}>Click</button>
  }
}

This is the simplest and cleanest solution yet!

  • Isn't onClick={e => this.handleClick(e)} more effecient? I believe it's almost the same as this.handleClick = this.handleClick.bind(this) except that the latter is more double-typing. – Игорь Щербаков Nov 7 '16 at 12:39
  • 2
    My example doesn't use .bind(), it defines the fat arrow as a class property and simply passes it in the callback prop. I would think this is more efficient than defining an arrow function in every render of a callback prop, and is less typing, especially if you want to use the handler in multiple places in your render function. – Aaron Nov 7 '16 at 13:25
10

Like others have said, React doesn't autobind methods to the instance when using ES6 classes. That said, I would make habit of always using arrow functions in event handlers like: onClick={e => this.handleClick()}

Instead of: onClick={this.handleClick.bind(this)}

This because it means that you can replace the handleClick method with a spy in a test, something you can't do when you use bind.

  • In your arrow example, the handleClick method does not get the DOM element as an argument unless you explicitly pass it right? – Stijn de Witt Oct 4 '15 at 12:32
  • Right, it needs to be onClick={e => this.handleClick(e.target)} for the handleClick function to get the clicked element. – Anders Ekdahl Dec 7 '15 at 20:10

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