8

I am trying (and failing) to work out how I can run a fully interactive shell program from within Java.

Here's the scenario:

I have a large GUI application which is cross platform and written in Java. Into that I am trying to add an interactive command line environment for running headless. That side of things is all fine and dandy. However, one of the functions of the main GUI is editing of files. Now, for the command line interface I want to be able to execute an external editor to edit the files, then return back to where I was after I have saved and exited. For example, on Linux it may execute "vi /path/to/file".

So how can I execute that command in such a way that the keyboard and display are fully interactive to the application? I don't want it to run in the background. I don't want it to redirect IO through Java, I just want that one single command to run "in the foreground" until it exists.

Just like as if I'd used the system() function in C.

Everything I have found so far runs commands in the background or pipe the IO through Java, which won't work for interactive (non line-mode) applications.

Oh, and one final caveat: I'm restricted to Java 1.6 compatibility, so I can't do fancy things with ProcessBuilder.

Here's the obligatory SSCCE:

class exetest {
    public static void main(String[] args) { 
        try {
            Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("vi");
            p.waitFor();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

I would expect the Runtime.getRuntime().exec() to block until I had finished in vi, and during that time all keyboard input would go direct (RAW as it's known) through to vi and all screen output would come directly back, untouched, to the user.

And this is how I would achieve it in C:

void main() {
    system("vi");
}

Update:

This achieves the desired result, but a) is limited to Linux / OSX (not that much of a problem, but would be nice to have it cross platform), and b) is a terrible kludge:

import java.io.*;

class exetest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("/bin/bash");
            OutputStream stdin = p.getOutputStream();
            PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(stdin);
            pw.println("vi < /dev/tty > /dev/tty");
            pw.close();
            p.waitFor();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
  • Do you want something like github.com/ronniedong/Expect-for-Java ? – Konstantin V. Salikhov Apr 19 '15 at 17:52
  • No, I don't. I don't want Java to interact with the executed program, I want the user to interact with it. So they type edit myfile and it executes vi /path/to/myfile and the user edits the file as if they had typed vi /path/to/myfile at the terminal. – Majenko Apr 19 '15 at 17:53
5

The exact equivalent of system("vi") is:

final ProcessBuilder p = new ProcessBuilder("vi");
p.redirectInput(Redirect.INHERIT);
p.redirectOutput(Redirect.INHERIT);
p.redirectError(Redirect.INHERIT);

p.start().waitFor();

(I know this is with 3 years delay, but for the others with same problem)

  • 1
    You can also replace the three redirect* calls with single p.inheritIO() call. Also note that these methods are available in JDK 1.7+ only. – Toparvion Feb 10 '19 at 2:40
  • 1
    system does other stuff too, like ignoring SIGINT so that ^C kills the child but not the parent. (This is one of the rare instances where that behavior is desirable.) – Davis Herring Aug 5 '19 at 13:14
3

I declare in advance that this is a terrible kludge, but given your constraints, I'm not sure you'll find something more elegant.

Also, it will not work on Windows.

Use bash:

class Exetest {
    public static void main(String[] args) { 
        try {
            // Create a one-liner for bash
            // Note that the trick is to do all the redirects and
            // give the name of the file in a single argument.
            String [] commandline = new String[3];
            commandline[0] = "bash";
            commandline[1] = "-c";
            commandline[2] = "vi </dev/tty >/dev/tty test.txt";
            Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(commandline);
            p.waitFor();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

When done this way, you can craft your actual command in run-time.

  • You're right, that is a terrible kludge ;) And yes, it achieves the desired result, but I'm not sure I could live with that implementation. The editor executable would be decided upon at runtime, and I'm not sure you can craft a bash command in one line including the redirects, so it would have to generate a script on the fly for execution. Not nice. – Majenko Apr 19 '15 at 19:14
  • @Majenko I edited to give you a bash-based one liner where the command can be crafted in runtime. – RealSkeptic Apr 19 '15 at 19:24
  • I tried that earlier - the redirection didn't work. You have to send it through stdin as in my edit above. – Majenko Apr 19 '15 at 19:25
  • @Majenko, believe me, I tested before I pasted. On both Mac and Linux, this worked. Are you sure you included the -c and used a command array rather than a string? – RealSkeptic Apr 19 '15 at 19:29
  • I may have done it as a string not an array actually. Still stdin works and is marginally safer (though not much). – Majenko Apr 19 '15 at 19:34
-1

Well, first, ProcessBuilder is in Java 6 too. If you mean that version in inadequate, or something, then I think there are two pieces of information you need to know. First, the main way of running an "exernal editor" would likely be to use the Runtime class and exec method. I suspect thats what you are doing already? Second, your current GUI, at some level, has an "event loop" which is a simple, but main, thread, that does nothing but "waits for an event" (such as keypress or "window event"), dispatches that event to interested listeners, and then waits for the next event. Keypresses and events to the external editor, would not be coming through this event loop ... well, not easily, anyway, without using something much more elaborate, like OLE APIs. But, it is that "event loop" that keeps Java alive and interactive while other things also go on, such as editing in an external editor. I'm not sure what GUI framework you are using, but most would already have such a loop and you shouldn't have to worry about it. If you are saying that in this command line mode you want, you do NOT want your normal GUI running, then you basically have to duplicae the "event loop" that is has, and start that thread first, and then call the runtime.exec method. Make sense?

FWIW, if you don't "have source" to see the GUI framework you are currently using, if you wanted to see one, just for learning more about event loops, Eclipse SWT has one in it's "Display" class and some examples that might be similar to what you want to do. (Note, SWT can be run "stand alone" without the rest of Eclipse, in case you were wondering).

HTH

  • When running in CLI mode there is no GUI. The GUI code doesn't even get started. When it does it's all swing. With no GUI there is no GUI event loop. I am actually using JLine for the CLI interface. – Majenko Apr 19 '15 at 18:19
  • ProcessBuilder in 6 doesn't have the Redirect class. – Majenko Apr 19 '15 at 18:19

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