5

I would like to compare two little-endian 256-bit values with A64 Neon instructions (asm) efficiently.


Equality (=)

For equality, I already got a solution:

bool eq256(const UInt256 *lhs, const UInt256 *rhs) {
    bool result;

First, load the two values into SIMD registers.

    __asm__("ld1.2d    { v0, v1 }, %1    \n\t"
            "ld1.2d    { v2, v3 }, %2    \n\t"

Compare each 64-bit limb of the values with each other. This results in -1 (all bits set) for those limbs that are equal, and 0 (all bits clear) if a bit differs.

            "cmeq.2d   v0, v0, v2        \n\t"
            "cmeq.2d   v1, v1, v3        \n\t"

Reduce the result from 2 vectors to 1 vector, keeping only the one that contains "0 (all bits clear)" if there is any.

            "uminp.16b v0, v0, v1        \n\t"

Reduce the result from 1 vector to 1 byte, keeping only a byte with zeroes if there is any.

            "uminv.16b b0, v0            \n\t"

Move to ARM register, then compare with 0xFF. This is the result.

            "umov      %w0, v0.b[0]      \n\t"
            "cmp       %w0, 0xFF         \n\t"
            "cset      %w0, eq               "
            : "=r" (result)
            : "m" (*lhs->value), "m" (*rhs->value)
            : "v0", "v1", "v2", "v3", "cc");
    return result;
}

Questions

  • Is this more efficient than doing the 4 comparisons with plain old ARM registers?

    • e.g. is there a source that quotes timings for the different operations? I'm doing this on iPhone 5s.
  • Is there a way to optimize this even further? I think that I waste many cycles just to reduce the whole vector to a single scalar boolean.


Less Than comparison (<)

Let's represent the two ints as tuples of 64-bit limbs (little-endian):

  • lhs = (l0, l1, l2, l3)
  • rhs = (r0, r1, r2, r3)

Then, lhs < rhs, if this evaluates to true:

(l3 < r3) &     1     &     1     &     1     |
(l3 = r3) & (l2 < r2) &     1     &     1     |
(l3 = r3) & (l2 = r2) & (l1 < r1) &     1     |
(l3 = r3) & (l2 = r2) & (l1 = r1) & (l0 < r0)

SIMD instructions can now be used to evaluate multiple operands at a time. Assuming (l1, l2), (l3, l4), (r1, r2), (r3, r4) is the way that the two 256-bit numbers are stored, we can easily get all of the required values (useful values in bold):

  • cmlo.2d => (l1 < r1), (l2 < r2)
  • cmlo.2d => (l3 < r3), (l4 < r4)
  • cmeq.2d => (l1 = r1), (l2 = r2)
  • cmeq.2d => (l3 = r3), (l4 = r4)

Questions

  • With these values in four SIMD registers, I now wonder what the best strategy is to apply the & and | operators, and then reducing it to a single boolean.

Update

I just punched together a working implementation for "less than".

Basically, I replaced the 1s above with a duplicate condition, because A & A == A & 1.

Then, I lay out the three 2x2 squares in my matrix, and bitwise AND them. Now, I reduce with bitwise ORs - first from two vectors to one vector, then to one byte, then copy to ARM register, and test for 0xFF. Same pattern as for equality above.

Question above is still valid. I'm not sure if the code is optimal yet, and wonder if I missed some general SIMD pattern to do such stuff more efficiently. Also: Is NEON worth it for such cases, when the input operands come from memory?

bool lt256(const UInt256 *lhs, const UInt256 *rhs) {
    bool result;
    __asm__(// (l3 < r3) & (l3 < r3) |
            // (l3 = r3) & (l2 < r2) |
            // (l3 = r3) & (l2 = r2) & (l1 < r1) & (l1 < r1) |
            // (l3 = r3) & (l2 = r2) & (l1 = r1) & (l0 < r0)

            "ld1.2d    { v0, v1 }, %1    \n\t"
            "ld1.2d    { v2, v3 }, %2    \n\t"

            // v0: [ l3 = r3 ] [ l2 = r2 ]
            // v1: [ l0 < r0 ] [ l1 < r1 ]
            // v2: [ l0 = r0 ] [ l1 = r1 ]
            // v3: [ l2 < r2 ] [ l3 < r3 ]
            // v4: [ l2 = r2 ] [ l3 = r3 ]
            "cmeq.2d   v4, v1, v3        \n\t"
            "cmlo.2d   v3, v1, v3        \n\t"
            "cmlo.2d   v1, v0, v2        \n\t"
            "cmeq.2d   v2, v0, v2        \n\t"
            "ext.16b   v0, v4, v4, 8     \n\t"

            // v2: [ l1 < r1 ] [ l1 = r1 ]
            // v1: [ l1 < r1 ] [ l0 < r0 ]
            "trn2.2d   v2, v1, v2        \n\t"
            "ext.16b   v1, v1, v1, 8     \n\t"

            // v1: [ l1 < r1  &  l1 < r1 ] [ l1 = r1  &  l0 < r0 ]
            "and.16b   v1, v2, v1        \n\t"

            // v2: [ l3 < r3 ] [ l3 = r3 ]
            // v3: [ l3 < r3 ] [ l2 < r2 ]
            "ext.16b   v2, v3, v0, 8     \n\t"
            "ext.16b   v3, v3, v3, 8     \n\t"

            // v3: [ l3 < r3  &  l3 < r3 ] [ l3 = r3  &  l2 < r2 ]
            "and.16b   v3, v2, v3        \n\t"

            // v2: [ l3 = r3 ] [ l3 = r3 ]
            // v4: [ l2 = r2 ] [ l2 = r2 ]
            "ext.16b   v2, v4, v0, 8     \n\t"
            "ext.16b   v4, v0, v4, 8     \n\t"

            // v2: [ l3 = r3  &  l2 = r2 ] [ l3 = r3  &  l2 = r2 ]
            "and.16b   v2, v2, v4        \n\t"

            // v1: [ l3 = r3 & l2 = r2 & l1 < r1 & l1 < r1 ]
            //     [ lr = r3 & l2 = r2 & l1 = r1 & l0 < r0 ]
            "and.16b   v1, v2, v1        \n\t"

            // v1: [ l3 < r3 & l3 < r3 |
            //       l3 = r3 & l2 = r2 & l1 < r1 & l1 < r1 ]
            //     [ l3 = r3 & l2 < r2 |
            //       lr = r3 & l2 = r2 & l1 = r1 & l0 < r0 ]
            "orr.16b   v1, v3, v1        \n\t"

            // b1: [ l3 < r3 & l3 < r3 |
            //       l3 = r3 & l2 = r2 & l1 < r1 & l1 < r1 |
            //       l3 = r3 & l2 < r2 |
            //       lr = r3 & l2 = r2 & l1 = r1 & l0 < r0 ]
            "umaxv.16b b1, v1            \n\t"
            "umov      %w0, v1.b[0]      \n\t"
            "cmp       %w0, 0xFF         \n\t"
            "cset      %w0, eq"
            : "=r" (result)
            : "m" (*lhs->value), "m" (*rhs->value)
            : "v0", "v1", "v2", "v3", "v4", "cc");
    return result;
}
2
  • 1
    How is UInt256 used elsewhere, i.e. are the values more likely to be in SIMD registers, General-purpose registers, or memory beforehand? I'd imagine cmp and 3 ccmps might have less overhead than a bunch of SIMD register juggling, but having to spill a bunch of GP registers and load the values is liable to tip the balance the other way. I suspect the overall efficiency question is best answered by benchmarking, as it's the kind of thing that will also be impacted by the rest of your code (register pressure, cache usage, etc.) – Notlikethat Apr 20 '15 at 9:22
  • They are in memory before, and loaded with "ld1". – Etan Apr 20 '15 at 9:26
3

Benchmark with XCTest measureMetrics with a Swift-based test runner. Two 256-bit Ints are allocated. Then, an operation is repeated 100 million times on the same two ints, measurement is stopped, and each limb of the two ints is assigned a new random value with arc4random. A second run is performed with Instruments attached, and the CPU time distribution is noted for each instruction as a comment right next to it.


Equality (==)

For equality, SIMD seems to lose when the result is transferred from the SIMD registers back to the ARM register. SIMD is probably only worth it when the result is used in further SIMD calculations, or if longer ints than 256-bit are used (ld1 seems to be faster than ldp).

  • SIMD

    bool result;
    __asm__("ld1.2d    { v0, v1 }, %1    \n\t"    //  5.1%
            "ld1.2d    { v2, v3 }, %2    \n\t"    // 26.4%
            "cmeq.2d   v0, v0, v2        \n\t"
            "cmeq.2d   v1, v1, v3        \n\t"
            "uminp.16b v0, v0, v1        \n\t"    //  4.0%
            "uminv.16b b0, v0            \n\t"    // 26.7%
            "umov      %w0, v0.b[0]      \n\t"    // 32.9%
            "cmp       %w0, 0xFF         \n\t"    //  0.0%
            "cset      %w0, eq               "
            : "=r" (result)
            : "m" (*lhs->value), "m" (*rhs->value)
            : "v0", "v1", "v2", "v3", "cc");
    return result;                                //  4.9% ("ret")
    

    measured [Time, seconds] average: 11.558, relative standard deviation: 0.065%, values: [11.572626, 11.560558, 11.549322, 11.568718, 11.558530, 11.550490, 11.557086, 11.551803, 11.557529, 11.549782]

  • Standard

    The winner here. The ccmp instruction really shines here :-) It is clear, though, that the problem is memory bound.

    bool result;
    __asm__("ldp       x8, x9, %1          \n\t"  // 33.4%
            "ldp       x10, x11, %2        \n\t"
            "cmp       x8, x10             \n\t"
            "ccmp      x9, x11, 0, eq      \n\t"
            "ldp       x8, x9, %1, 16      \n\t"  // 34.1%
            "ldp       x10, x11, %2, 16    \n\t"
            "ccmp      x8, x10, 0, eq      \n\t"  // 32.6%
            "ccmp      x9, x11, 0, eq      \n\t"
            "cset      %w0, eq             \n\t"
            : "=r" (result)
            : "m" (*lhs->value), "m" (*rhs->value)
            : "x8", "x9", "x10", "x11", "cc");
    return result;
    

    measured [Time, seconds] average: 11.146, relative standard deviation: 0.034%, values: [11.149754, 11.142854, 11.146840, 11.149392, 11.141254, 11.148708, 11.142293, 11.150491, 11.139593, 11.145873]

  • C

    LLVM fails to detect that "ccmp" is a good instruction to use here, and is slower than the asm version above.

    return
        lhs->value[0] == rhs->value[0] &
        lhs->value[1] == rhs->value[1] &
        lhs->value[2] == rhs->value[2] &
        lhs->value[3] == rhs->value[3];
    

    Compiled to

    ldp    x8, x9, [x0]                           // 24.1%
    ldp    x10, x11, [x1]                         //  0.1%
    cmp    x8, x10                                //  0.4%
    cset   w8, eq                                 //  1.0%
    cmp    x9, x11                                // 23.7%
    cset   w9, eq
    and    w8, w8, w9                             //  0.1%
    ldp    x9, x10, [x0, #16]
    ldp    x11, x12, [x1, #16]                    // 24.8%
    cmp    x9, x11
    cset   w9, eq                                 //  0.2%
    and    w8, w8, w9
    cmp    x10, x12                               //  0.3%
    cset   w9, eq                                 // 25.2%
    and    w0, w8, w9
    ret                                           //  0.1%
    

    measured [Time, seconds] average: 11.531, relative standard deviation: 0.040%, values: [11.525511, 11.529820, 11.541940, 11.531776, 11.533287, 11.526628, 11.531392, 11.526037, 11.531784, 11.533786]


Less Than (<)

(to be determined - will update later)

2
  • Nice work! In the ccmp variant, you'd potentially save some precious memory bandwidth by loading and testing the most significant pairs first, and skipping over the second set of loads entirely if that comparison fails. – Notlikethat Apr 25 '15 at 11:49
  • 2
    I want constant run time and no data-dependent memory access. – Etan Apr 25 '15 at 14:03

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