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Why doesn't git log simply log all the latest commits?

And what does this mean?

--all
       Pretend as if all the refs in refs/ are listed on the command line as <commit>.

I assume, once translated into plain English, that it means show all the latest commits.

Can someone clarify.

10

No, that doesn't mean it shows all the latest commits. It shows all commits in the history of branches, tags and other refs, but it does not show commits that are not reachable from any ref. A typical example of a commit that is not reachable from any ref is when you've just run git commit --amend: the previous commit still exists locally, but it's no longer reachable and won't be shown in git log --all. But git reflog will confirm that it does indeed still exist.

As for why --all isn't the default: you normally won't want that. For instance, if you're on branch master, and you run git log, you typically aren't interested in the history of any feature branches, you typically want to see the history of master.

If you do normally want the --all behaviour, I recommend creating an alias.

1

According to a post here git --all missing commit:

log --all is only for listing commits referenced in refs/ (like tags, heads, ...)

The same page also says:

The --all option does not tell git log to display all commits. It asks for the logs of all refs, basically your branches and tags.

0

Because wanting to see the history of all branches/etc. isn't as common when working as wanting to see the history of something specific, typically the current branch.

I assume, once translated into plain English, that it means show all the latest commits.

No. refs/ contains things like branches and tags. If you want to see the history of a particular branch, or a particular set of branches, you list them in your git log command. If you want to see the history of all branches/tags/etc., then you can use the --all shortcut.

Git log doesn't just show 'the latest commits': it shows all commits that fit the given criteria, of which there are several dimensions. E.g., what branches is the commit on, is the commit in a particular range, etc.

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