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I'm having some trouble writing a function to go from:

[(232, [230, 231]), (148, [144, 145, 147, 232]), (231, [214, 215])]

to

[[148, [144, 145, 147, [232, [230, [231, [214, 215]]]]]]]

The first element in each tuple is the parent of the elements in the corresponding list element. 148 is the root (the value is stored in a variable somewhere else) and starting with the root I need to replace 232 with the corresponding list and then 231 in the list that just replaced 232.

It needs to be a general, recursive solution because I can end up with a much more complicated case such as:

[(227, [187, 188, 190, 192, 242]), (240, [238, 239, 305]), (305, [307, 308, 309]), (242, [256, 257, 258]), (247, [227, 245, 246]), (248, [247]), (188, [189, 191]), (190, [233, 234, 240])]

Where 248 is the root.

Alternatively, if there is a better way to structure the data in general, in other words if what I'm doing is stupid, I'm open to suggestions.

  • 1
    Maybe it would be good to take a step back. What is this data representing? Where are you getting the original list from, and what format is it in? At a glance it seems like a dictionary is a better format for the data you have there, but it's hard to tell with the information you give. – Fred S Apr 20 '15 at 23:38
  • If there elements are unique (it seems like they would have to be to recurse through them) a dict is the better data structure. – nathancahill Apr 20 '15 at 23:39
  • What if the structure implied by the data is itself recursive? Such as [(232, [230, 231]), (231, [214, 215]), (215, [232])] -- it seems like you can't have a general solution without a ton of extra assumptions (keep in mind that it could be arbitrarily far from the beginning that a cycle of data recursion begins, you can't check that property without visiting all of the data). Even just computing the root is tricky. It seems like the data ought to be stored in a database according to some relationships that make this computation easy (if this computation is indeed necessary). – ely Apr 21 '15 at 0:02
  • @Mr.F Fair point. You're right, I wasn't explicit in what assumptions can be made. But for my case at least, I can assume no circular relationships. – laphiloctete Apr 21 '15 at 0:38
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    I'm trying to keep the code light and readable. I can make it Fort Knox later. I try to adhere to most of these, the one which applies here is Speculative Generality. blog.codinghorror.com/code-smells xp.c2.com/YouArentGonnaNeedIt.html – laphiloctete Apr 21 '15 at 0:57
1

Something like this should work if you're using a dict:

original = {232: [230, 231], 148: [144, 145, 147, 232], 231: [214, 215]}

def expand(data, number, dest):
    if data.get(number):
        res = []

        for n in data.get(number):
            expand(data, n, res)

        dest.append([number, res])
    else:
        dest.append(number)

    return dest

print expand(original, 148, [])
[[148, [144, 145, 147, [232, [230, [231, [214, 215]]]]]]] 
  • Note that it will lead to max recursion error in the case when the data itself implies a circular relationship, such as the example in my other comment. – ely Apr 21 '15 at 0:09
  • This is pretty much what I need. Thanks a bunch! – laphiloctete Apr 21 '15 at 0:59

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