229

I have a dataframe look like this:

import pandas
import numpy as np
df = DataFrame(np.random.rand(4,4), columns = list('abcd'))
df
      a         b         c         d
0  0.418762  0.042369  0.869203  0.972314
1  0.991058  0.510228  0.594784  0.534366
2  0.407472  0.259811  0.396664  0.894202
3  0.726168  0.139531  0.324932  0.906575

How I can get all columns except column b?

  • @cs95 -- The currently listed duplicate target isn't a duplicate. Despite the original title, the linked question is "Why doesn't this specific syntax work", whereas this question is a more general "What is the best way to do this". -- Add to this the difference between deleting a column from an existing DataFrame versus creating a new DataFrame with all-but-one of the columns of another. – R.M. May 21 '19 at 19:30
  • @R.M. I'm sorry but I don't agree with the edit you've made to the title on that post, so I've rolled it back. It's true that the intent of the OP was to question the syntax, but the post has grown to address the more broad question of how to delete a column. The answers in this post are carbon copies of the highest upvoted post there. The dupe stays. – cs95 May 21 '19 at 19:46
  • Note this question is being discussed on Meta. – Heretic Monkey May 21 '19 at 21:24
345

When the columns are not a MultiIndex, df.columns is just an array of column names so you can do:

df.loc[:, df.columns != 'b']

          a         c         d
0  0.561196  0.013768  0.772827
1  0.882641  0.615396  0.075381
2  0.368824  0.651378  0.397203
3  0.788730  0.568099  0.869127
  • 10
    Not bad, but @mike's solution using drop is better IMO. A bit more readable and handles multiindexes – travc Jun 30 '17 at 0:24
  • 3
    I actually agree that @mike's solution using drop is better - I do think it's useful to discover that (single-level) columns are arrays you can work with, but specifically for dropping a column, drop is very readable and works well with complex indexes. – Marius Apr 23 '19 at 23:06
  • 1
    Thank you for this greate answer. what if I don't have a header ? how do I adrress ? – FabioSpaghetti Sep 17 '19 at 14:03
197

Don't use ix. It's deprecated. The most readable and idiomatic way of doing this is df.drop():

>>> df

          a         b         c         d
0  0.175127  0.191051  0.382122  0.869242
1  0.414376  0.300502  0.554819  0.497524
2  0.142878  0.406830  0.314240  0.093132
3  0.337368  0.851783  0.933441  0.949598

>>> df.drop('b', axis=1)

          a         c         d
0  0.175127  0.382122  0.869242
1  0.414376  0.554819  0.497524
2  0.142878  0.314240  0.093132
3  0.337368  0.933441  0.949598

Note that by default, .drop() does not operate inplace; despite the ominous name, df is unharmed by this process. If you want to permanently remove b from df, do df.drop('b', inplace=True).

df.drop() also accepts a list of labels, e.g. df.drop(['a', 'b'], axis=1) will drop column a and b.

  • 1
    Also works on a multiindex just like you'd expect it to. df.drop([('l1name', 'l2name'), 'anotherl1name'], axis=1). Seems to use list vs tuple to determine if you want multiple columns (list) or referring to a multiindex (tuple). – travc Jun 30 '17 at 0:20
  • 14
    More readable: df.drop(columns='a') or df.drop(columns=['a', 'b']). Can also replace columns= with index=. – BallpointBen May 9 '18 at 13:52
  • However this is not useful if you happen not to know the names of all the columns you want to drop. – yeliabsalohcin Sep 4 '18 at 16:17
119
df[df.columns.difference(['b'])]

Out: 
          a         c         d
0  0.427809  0.459807  0.333869
1  0.678031  0.668346  0.645951
2  0.996573  0.673730  0.314911
3  0.786942  0.719665  0.330833
  • 7
    I like this approach as it can be used to omit more than one column. – Nischal Hp Aug 30 '17 at 9:42
  • 2
    @NischalHp df.drop can also omit more than one column df.drop(['a', 'b'], axis=1) – Patrick Li Apr 25 '19 at 13:02
  • 1
    I think it's worth noting that this can re-arrange your columns – ocean800 Nov 18 '19 at 6:33
  • 1
    @ocean800 Yes that's true. You can pass sort=False if you want to avoid that behaviour (df.columns.difference(['b'], sort=False)) – ayhan Nov 18 '19 at 6:44
46

You can use df.columns.isin()

df.loc[:, ~df.columns.isin(['b'])]

When you want to drop multiple columns, as simple as:

df.loc[:, ~df.columns.isin(['col1', 'col2'])]
12

Here is another way:

df[[i for i in list(df.columns) if i != '<your column>']]

You just pass all columns to be shown except of the one you do not want.

5

Another slight modification to @Salvador Dali enables a list of columns to exclude:

df[[i for i in list(df.columns) if i not in [list_of_columns_to_exclude]]]

or

df.loc[:,[i for i in list(df.columns) if i not in [list_of_columns_to_exclude]]]
2

I think the best way to do is the way mentioned by @Salvador Dali. Not that the others are wrong.

Because when you have a data set where you just want to select one column and put it into one variable and the rest of the columns into another for comparison or computational purposes. Then dropping the column of the data set might not help. Of course there are use cases for that as well.

x_cols = [x for x in data.columns if x != 'name of column to be excluded']

Then you can put those collection of columns in variable x_cols into another variable like x_cols1 for other computation.

ex: x_cols1 = data[x_cols]
  • Can you explain why this is a separate answer instead of a comment / extension to Salvador's answer? – Hans Janssen Nov 6 '19 at 9:10
2

Here is a one line lambda:

df[map(lambda x :x not in ['b'], list(df.columns))]

before:

import pandas
import numpy as np
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(4,4), columns = list('abcd'))
df

       a           b           c           d
0   0.774951    0.079351    0.118437    0.735799
1   0.615547    0.203062    0.437672    0.912781
2   0.804140    0.708514    0.156943    0.104416
3   0.226051    0.641862    0.739839    0.434230

after:

df[map(lambda x :x not in ['b'], list(df.columns))]

        a          c          d
0   0.774951    0.118437    0.735799
1   0.615547    0.437672    0.912781
2   0.804140    0.156943    0.104416
3   0.226051    0.739839    0.434230

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.