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I am using std::unordered_map with custom classes as shown below. I have correctly initialised and set up the hasher function. What I want to know is how to use the find function and what will it return? I am confused as the reference doc says that for the unordered_map the value acts as the key.

SO was wondering what the iterator would point to in the case of below find function

class xyz {
public:
 int x;
 int y;
 int z;

//Required stuff
.
.
.
}

// Required Stuff
.
.
.

int main()
{
  std::unordered_map<class xyz, std::string, KeyHasher> dummy = {
    { {10, 11, 12}, "example"},
    { {2, 3, 21}, "another"}
  };
  std::unordered_map<xyz, std::string, keyHasher>::const_iterator got = dummy.find({2, 3, 21});

  //What will find return here? Is it the pointer to string "another"?

}

I have referred the following for basic setup of the custom classes. C++ unordered_map using a custom class type as the key

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/unordered_set/unordered_set/find/

  • Should be std::unordered_map<xyz, std::string, KeyHasher> or std::unordered_map<class xyz, const char *, KeyHasher> – Mohit Jain Apr 21 '15 at 8:15
  • Thanks, corrected it. – user4089193 Apr 21 '15 at 8:20
0

Given fixed code such as:

std::unordered_map<xyz, std::string, keyHasher>::const_iterator got = dummy.find({2, 3, 21});

What will find return here? Is it the pointer to string "another"?

It's an iterator to the matching {key, value} std::pair.

  • You can check that the find found the key with got != dummy.end().

  • If-and-only-if found, you can access the value "another" using the notation got->second, or access the key again as got->first.

confused as the reference doc says that for the unordered_map the value acts as the key.

That's just wrong - the unordered_map does not use the value as the key... it associates the value with the key, such that the value can be looked up using the key as discussed above.

  • Thank You. About the second question, I misunderstood the reference doc. (cplusplus.com/reference/unordered_set/unordered_set) I quote the info from the document " In an unordered_set, the value of an element is at the same time its key, that identifies it uniquely. " This line confused me :) thank you . – user4089193 Apr 21 '15 at 8:28
  • @nightfury: it is a bit of a weird thing to say, and can be misleading given a custom comparison or operator< on the set element type might effectively make something else the key - such as a subset of the value's state. Elements are only "uniquely identified" in the sense that if !(a < b) && !(b < a) they're considered equal for the purposes of the set. BTW, I recommend using cppreference.com over cplusplus.com - the latter is famously unreliable. – Tony Delroy Apr 21 '15 at 9:07

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