21

So I have this string:

var name = "Chaim";
var templateStr = "Hello, my name is ${name}";

How can I convert it into a template-string so that the result would be equal to:

var template = `Hello, my name is ${name}`;

Is there a way to programmatically construct a Template literal?

  • 1
    You cannot without eval, and I don't think you want that. Why not just use a template string in the first place? – Bergi Apr 21 '15 at 11:59
  • Because I want to pass a dynamic string to be used as the template. – haim770 Apr 21 '15 at 11:59
  • @haim770 Why can't the dynamic string be a Template literal? – thefourtheye Apr 21 '15 at 12:01
  • Because it's returned from the server as part of an Http response. – haim770 Apr 21 '15 at 12:02
  • 1
    This is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/q/29182244/218196, but @Bergi's answer is better ;) – Felix Kling Apr 21 '15 at 13:43
29

Is there a way to programmatically construct a Template literal?

No. "programmatically" and "literal" are antithetic (except you are in the realms of compilers).

Template strings should better have been named interpolated string literals or so. Please do not confuse them with templates. If you want to use dynamically created strings for templates, use a template engine of your choice.

Of course template literals might help with the implementation of such, and you might get away with something simple as

function assemble(literal, params) {
    return new Function(params, "return `"+literal+"`;"); // TODO: Proper escaping
//             ^^^^^^^^ working in real ES6 environments only, of course
}
var template = assemble("Hello, my name is ${name}", "name");
template("Chaim"); // Hello, my name is Chaim
  • 2
    Template strings should better have been named interpolated string literals - Aren't they called as Quasi literals? – thefourtheye Apr 28 '15 at 15:57
  • The programmatically ≠ litteral is the key here. – Christophe Marois Mar 18 '16 at 20:27
  • This is dangerous as it basically eval()s the string. – ADJenks Mar 28 '19 at 0:06
  • @adjenks Yes, you need to make sure that the literal is a valid and safe value. It's dangerous only when you do not control the value. – Bergi Mar 28 '19 at 9:33

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