422

I'm trying to POST a JSON object using fetch.

From what I can understand, I need to attach a stringified object to the body of the request, e.g.:

fetch("/echo/json/",
{
    headers: {
      'Accept': 'application/json',
      'Content-Type': 'application/json'
    },
    method: "POST",
    body: JSON.stringify({a: 1, b: 2})
})
.then(function(res){ console.log(res) })
.catch(function(res){ console.log(res) })

When using jsfiddle's json echo I'd expect to see the object I've sent ({a: 1, b: 2}) back, but this does not happen - chrome devtools doesn't even show the JSON as part of the request, which means that it's not being sent.

  • What browser are you using? – Krzysztof Safjanowski Apr 21 '15 at 15:02
  • @KrzysztofSafjanowski chrome 42, which is meant to have full fetch support – Razor Apr 21 '15 at 15:03
  • check this fiddle jsfiddle.net/abbpbah4/2 what data you're expecting ? because get request of fiddle.jshell.net/echo/json is showing empty object. {} – Kaushik Apr 21 '15 at 15:07
  • @KaushikKishore edited to clarify expected output. res.json() should return {a: 1, b: 2}. – Razor Apr 21 '15 at 15:18
  • 1
    You forgot to include the json property that contains the data you want to send. However, I the body is not being treated correctly anyway. See this fiddle to see that the delay of 5 seconds gets skipped. jsfiddle.net/99arsnkg Also, when you try to add additional headers, they are ignored. This is probably an issue with fetch() itself. – boombox Apr 21 '15 at 16:03

11 Answers 11

421

With ES2017 async/await support, this is how to POST a JSON payload:

(async () => {
  const rawResponse = await fetch('https://httpbin.org/post', {
    method: 'POST',
    headers: {
      'Accept': 'application/json',
      'Content-Type': 'application/json'
    },
    body: JSON.stringify({a: 1, b: 'Textual content'})
  });
  const content = await rawResponse.json();

  console.log(content);
})();

Can't use ES2017? See @vp_art's answer using promises

The question however is asking for an issue caused by a long since fixed chrome bug.
Original answer follows.

chrome devtools doesn't even show the JSON as part of the request

This is the real issue here, and it's a bug with chrome devtools, fixed in Chrome 46.

That code works fine - it is POSTing the JSON correctly, it just cannot be seen.

I'd expect to see the object I've sent back

that's not working because that is not the correct format for JSfiddle's echo.

The correct code is:

var payload = {
    a: 1,
    b: 2
};

var data = new FormData();
data.append( "json", JSON.stringify( payload ) );

fetch("/echo/json/",
{
    method: "POST",
    body: data
})
.then(function(res){ return res.json(); })
.then(function(data){ alert( JSON.stringify( data ) ) })

For endpoints accepting JSON payloads, the original code is correct

  • 14
    For the record, this isn't posting a JSON payload - this is a form post (x-www-form-urlencoded) with a JSON data in a field named json. So the data is doubly encoded. For a clean JSON post, see answer by @vp_arth below. – mindplay.dk Nov 8 '17 at 14:55
  • 1
    @mindplay.dk This is not a x-www-form-urlencoded post. Fetch API always uses multipart/form-data encoding on FormData objects. – JukkaP Apr 14 '18 at 11:07
  • @JukkaP I stand corrected. My main point was the double encoding issue. – mindplay.dk Apr 15 '18 at 15:56
  • 2
    Content-Type is still text/html; charset=iso-8859-1 dont know what i am doing wrong... – KT Works May 16 '18 at 21:20
  • 2
    To be on the safe side, it would be good to confirm res.ok in case the response code is some kind of error. It'd also be good to have a .catch() clause at the end. I realize this is just a sample snippet, but bear these things in mind for real world usage. – Ken Lyon Jul 9 '18 at 16:47
171

I think your issue is jsfiddle can process form-urlencoded request only.

But correct way to make json request is pass correct json as a body:

fetch('https://httpbin.org/post', {
  method: 'post',
  headers: {
    'Accept': 'application/json, text/plain, */*',
    'Content-Type': 'application/json'
  },
  body: JSON.stringify({a: 7, str: 'Some string: &=&'})
}).then(res=>res.json())
  .then(res => console.log(res));

  • 2
    tnx. correct solution in asp.net mvc. – MJ Vakili Jun 14 '17 at 7:24
  • 6
    This is the correct solution, period - everyone else seems to be mixed up about x-www-form-urlencoded vs application/json, either mismatching them or double-wrapping JSON in a url-encoded strings. – mindplay.dk Nov 8 '17 at 14:56
  • But this doesn't work for jsfiddle. So, I'm not sure I understand why you would say "This is the correct solution, period". Isn't everyone else doing the wrapping to satisfy the API of jsfiddle's /echo route? – adam-beck May 23 '18 at 4:38
41

From search engines, I ended up on this topic for non-json posting data with fetch, so thought I would add this.

For non-json you don't have to use form data. You can simply set the Content-Type header to application/x-www-form-urlencoded and use a string:

fetch('url here', {
    method: 'POST',
    headers: {'Content-Type':'application/x-www-form-urlencoded'}, // this line is important, if this content-type is not set it wont work
    body: 'foo=bar&blah=1'
});

An alternative way to build that body string, rather then typing it out as I did above, is to use libraries. For instance the stringify function from query-string or qs packages. So using this it would look like:

import queryString from 'query-string';
fetch('url here', {
    method: 'POST',
    headers: {'Content-Type':'application/x-www-form-urlencoded'}, // this line is important, if this content-type is not set it wont work
    body: queryString.stringify({for:'bar', blah:1}
});
  • 2
    thank you very much for query string, i tried so many times with JSON.stringify but ajax was not returning response. but query string did the trick. I found also that it was because fetch create json for body params instead of creating a string. – Danish Feb 25 '17 at 18:22
  • 1
    Thank you man! This is the best reply! I was hitting the wall yesterday for few hours trying to find a way to send 'body' with form data from my web application to my server... One suggestion: $ npm install cors --save This is needed to get rid of " mode : 'no-cors' " in Fetch request see github.com/expressjs/cors – Alexander Cherednichenko Jul 6 '17 at 6:51
  • Thanks @AlexanderCherednichenko ! And thanks for sharing that cors note thats an interesting one I didn't know about. :) – Noitidart Jul 6 '17 at 7:07
  • Thanks a lot for that, I totally missed the correct Content-type, my PHP backend wasn't receiving anything. 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded' fixed it properly. – Link14 Aug 9 '17 at 1:06
34

After spending some times, reverse engineering jsFiddle, trying to generate payload - there is an effect.

Please take eye (care) on line return response.json(); where response is not a response - it is promise.

var json = {
    json: JSON.stringify({
        a: 1,
        b: 2
    }),
    delay: 3
};

fetch('/echo/json/', {
    method: 'post',
    headers: {
        'Accept': 'application/json, text/plain, */*',
        'Content-Type': 'application/json'
    },
    body: 'json=' + encodeURIComponent(JSON.stringify(json.json)) + '&delay=' + json.delay
})
.then(function (response) {
    return response.json();
})
.then(function (result) {
    alert(result);
})
.catch (function (error) {
    console.log('Request failed', error);
});

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/egxt6cpz/46/ && Firefox > 39 && Chrome > 42

  • Why 'x-www-form-urlencoded instead application/json? What's the difference? – Juan Picado Feb 2 '17 at 9:37
  • @JuanPicado - after jsfiddle reverse engineering 2 years ago it was only one option that it could work. Of course application/json is the correct form and it works now. Thanks for good eye : ) – Krzysztof Safjanowski Feb 2 '17 at 9:59
  • yw. Curious detail, it works for me in the old way with fetch (stackoverflow.com/questions/41984893/…) instead the application/json. Perhaps you know why ... – Juan Picado Feb 2 '17 at 10:02
  • 5
    The Content-Type is application/json, but your actual body appears to be x-www-form-urlencoded - I don't think this should work? If it does work, your server must be pretty forgiving. The answer by @vp_arth below appears to be the correct one. – mindplay.dk Nov 8 '17 at 14:53
16

I have created a thin wrapper around fetch() with many improvements if you are using a purely json REST API:

// Small library to improve on fetch() usage
const api = function(method, url, data, headers = {}){
  return fetch(url, {
    method: method.toUpperCase(),
    body: JSON.stringify(data),  // send it as stringified json
    credentials: api.credentials,  // to keep the session on the request
    headers: Object.assign({}, api.headers, headers)  // extend the headers
  }).then(res => res.ok ? res.json() : Promise.reject(res));
};

// Defaults that can be globally overwritten
api.credentials = 'include';
api.headers = {
  'csrf-token': window.csrf || '',    // only if globally set, otherwise ignored
  'Accept': 'application/json',       // receive json
  'Content-Type': 'application/json'  // send json
};

// Convenient methods
['get', 'post', 'put', 'delete'].forEach(method => {
  api[method] = api.bind(null, method);
});

To use it you have the variable api and 4 methods:

api.get('/todo').then(all => { /* ... */ });

And within an async function:

const all = await api.get('/todo');
// ...

Example with jQuery:

$('.like').on('click', async e => {
  const id = 123;  // Get it however it is better suited

  await api.put(`/like/${id}`, { like: true });

  // Whatever:
  $(e.target).addClass('active dislike').removeClass('like');
});
  • I think you meant a different set of arguments to Object.assign ? should be Object.assign({}, api.headers, headers) because you don't want to keep adding custom headers into hash of common api.headers. right? – Mobigital Mar 1 '18 at 19:44
  • @Mobigital totally right, I didn't know about that nuance back then but now it's the only way I do it – Francisco Presencia Mar 2 '18 at 6:14
10

This is related to Content-Type. As you might have noticed from other discussions and answers to this question some people were able to solve it by setting Content-Type: 'application/json'. Unfortunately in my case it didn't work, my POST request was still empty on the server side.

However, if you try with jQuery's $.post() and it's working, the reason is probably because of jQuery using Content-Type: 'x-www-form-urlencoded' instead of application/json.

data = Object.keys(data).map(key => encodeURIComponent(key) + '=' + encodeURIComponent(data[key])).join('&')
fetch('/api/', {
    method: 'post', 
    credentials: "include", 
    body: data, 
    headers: {'Content-Type': 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded'}
})
  • 1
    My backend dev built the API out with PHP, was expecting the data to be query string like, not a json object. This solved the empty response on the server side. – eballeste Oct 14 '17 at 22:53
10

Had the same issue - no body was sent from a client to a server.

Adding Content-Type header solved it for me:

var headers = new Headers();

headers.append('Accept', 'application/json'); // This one is enough for GET requests
headers.append('Content-Type', 'application/json'); // This one sends body

return fetch('/some/endpoint', {
    method: 'POST',
    mode: 'same-origin',
    credentials: 'include',
    redirect: 'follow',
    headers: headers,
    body: JSON.stringify({
        name: 'John',
        surname: 'Doe'
    }),
}).then(resp => {
    ...
}).catch(err => {
   ...
})
4

The top answer doesn't work for PHP7, because it has wrong encoding, but I could figure the right encoding out with the other answers. This code also sends authentication cookies, which you probably want when dealing with e.g. PHP forums:

julia = function(juliacode) {
    fetch('julia.php', {
        method: "POST",
        credentials: "include", // send cookies
        headers: {
            'Accept': 'application/json, text/plain, */*',
            //'Content-Type': 'application/json'
            "Content-Type": "application/x-www-form-urlencoded; charset=UTF-8" // otherwise $_POST is empty
        },
        body: "juliacode=" + encodeURIComponent(juliacode)
    })
    .then(function(response) {
        return response.json(); // .text();
    })
    .then(function(myJson) {
        console.log(myJson);
    });
}
3

It might be useful to somebody:

I was having the issue that formdata was not being sent for my request

In my case it was a combination of following headers that were also causing the issue and the wrong Content-Type.

So I was sending these two headers with the request and it wasn't sending the formdata when I removed the headers that worked.

"X-Prototype-Version" : "1.6.1",
"X-Requested-With" : "XMLHttpRequest"

Also as other answers suggest that the Content-Type header needs to be correct.

For my request the correct Content-Type header was:

"Content-Type": "application/x-www-form-urlencoded; charset=UTF-8"

So bottom line if your formdata is not being attached to the Request then it could potentially be your headers. Try bringing your headers to a minimum and then try adding them one by one to see if your problem is rsolved.

3

If your JSON payload contains arrays and nested objects, I would use URLSearchParams and jQuery's param() method.

fetch('/somewhere', {
  method: 'POST',
  body: new URLSearchParams($.param(payload))
})

To your server, this will look like a standard HTML <form> being POSTed.

-1

I think that, we don't need parse the JSON object into a string, if the remote server accepts json into they request, just run:

const request = await fetch ('/echo/json', {
  headers: {
    'Content-type': 'application/json'
  },
  method: 'POST',
  body: { a: 1, b: 2 }
});

Such as the curl request

curl -v -X POST -H 'Content-Type: application/json' -d '@data.json' '/echo/json'

In case to the remote serve not accept a json file as the body, just send a dataForm:

const data =  new FormData ();
data.append ('a', 1);
data.append ('b', 2);

const request = await fetch ('/echo/form', {
  headers: {
    'Content-type': 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded'
  },
  method: 'POST',
  body: data
});

Such as the curl request

curl -v -X POST -H 'Content-type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded' -d '@data.txt' '/echo/form'
  • This is blatantly incorrect. It has nothing to do with the server side whether or not you need to stringify your json. That is exactly what your curl command is doing implicitly! If you don't stringify your objects before passing them as the body you will just send "[object Object]" as the body of your request. A simple test in Dev Tools would show you that. Open it up and try this without leaving this tab: a = new FormData(); a.append("foo","bar"); fetch("/foo/bar", { method: 'POST', body: {}, headers: { 'Content-type': 'application/json' } }) – oligofren Jun 6 '18 at 7:30

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