16

Does the C++ standard require that dynamic initialization of non-local static variables, be performed in the same thread that calls main()?

More specifically, in C++11, is std::this_thread::get_id() guaranteed to return the same result in static initializers and inside main()?

Edit:

Even more specifically, given the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>

static std::thread::id id = std::this_thread::get_id();

int main()
{
        std::cout << id << "\n";
        std::cout << std::this_thread::get_id() << "\n";
        return 0;
}

are the two emitted thread IDs required/guaranteed to match?

  • 8
    Static initialization has a very specific definition in C++: it's zero-initialization and constant initialization grouped together, and cannot be observed from a program. What you're asking about is called dynamic initialization. – user743382 Apr 21 '15 at 14:59
  • It feels like there may be a question behind this question. What are you trying to accomplish? – Patrick O'Hara Apr 21 '15 at 15:09
  • No, it's an academic question (inspired by observed real-world behaviour, but in a somewhat different context). – Jeremy Apr 21 '15 at 16:12
0

Standard doesn't say anything about what thread should perform such initialization. It only requires specific orderings and guarantees:

3.6.2 Initialization of non-local variables [basic.start.init]

2. Static initialization shall be performed before any dynamic initialization takes place. [...] Variables with ordered initialization defined within a single translation unit shall be initialized in the order of their definitions in the translation unit. [...] If a program starts a thread, the subsequent initialization of a variable is unsequenced with respect to the initialization of a variable defined in a different translation unit. Otherwise, the initialization of a variable is indeterminately sequenced with respect to the initialization of a variable defined in a different translation unit.

4. It is implementation-defined whether the dynamic initialization of a non-local variable with static storage duration is done before the first statement of main. If the initialization is deferred to some point in time after the first statement of main, it shall occur before the first odr-use of any function or variable defined in the same translation unit as the variable to be initialized.

5. It is implementation-defined whether the dynamic initialization of a non-local variable with static or thread storage duration is done before the first statement of the initial function of the thread. If the initialization is deferred to some point in time after the first statement of the initial function of the thread, it shall occur before the first odr-use of any variable with thread storage duration defined in the same translation unit as the variable to be initialized.

However, most implementations will do so - initialization of static non-local variables will be performed in the same thread, that calls main(). Example from Visual C++ 11:

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>

using namespace std;

struct Cx
{
public:
    Cx()
    {
        cout<<"Cx: "<<std::this_thread::get_id()<<endl;
    }
};

static Cx c;

int main()
{
    cout<<"Main: "<<std::this_thread::get_id()<<endl;
    return 0;
}

Output:

Cx: 5820
Main: 5820

After setting breakpoint inside Cx::Cx():

enter image description here

  • In fact, the code posted illustrates exactly the case I'm asking about. – Jeremy Apr 21 '15 at 15:21
  • @T.C. Try to understand the question and then downvote. This answer is perfectly valid for case the OP was asking about. – Mateusz Grzejek Apr 21 '15 at 15:22
  • @MateuszGrzejek: Worth noting: for function-local statics, they're initialized by the first thread to execute the function. Visual Studio used to have a race condition here. – Mooing Duck Aug 16 '16 at 19:16
  • @MooingDuck It wasn't a problem with VS. Pre-C++11 standards didn't say anything about multi-threaded scenarios, they didn't even define the word thread. C++ 11 introduced MT stuff together with requirement about initialization of statics, which is required to be thread-safe now. – Mateusz Grzejek Sep 12 '16 at 22:09
  • @MateuszGrzejek: I could have sworn it was a bug, but blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/oldnewthing/20040308-00/?p=40363 confirms you're right, that was actually the mandated behavior pre-11. – Mooing Duck Sep 18 '16 at 23:00
5

No. The standard nowhere provides such a guarantee, and in fact the contrary is implied by [basic.start.init]/p2:

If a program starts a thread (30.3), the subsequent initialization of a variable is unsequenced with respect to the initialization of a variable defined in a different translation unit. Otherwise, the initialization of a variable is indeterminately sequenced with respect to the initialization of a variable defined in a different translation unit. If a program starts a thread, the subsequent unordered initialization of a variable is unsequenced with respect to every other dynamic initialization. Otherwise, the unordered initialization of a variable is indeterminately sequenced with respect to every other dynamic initialization.

There would be no need to weaken the sequencing guarantee in the presence of threads if all initializations had to be performed on the same thread.

  • The program is not starting any threads, and it's all in one translation unit. @Mateusz Grzejek's answer below illustrates the case and appears to cite the more relevant clauses. – Jeremy Apr 21 '15 at 15:32
  • @Jeremy Where do these qualifications appear in your question? – T.C. Apr 21 '15 at 15:35
0

No, though it may be a good idea to write your program that way. The syntax requires that static initialization happens in a deterministic way, but does not dictate things like the thread involved.

  • If the standard doesn't guarantee it then surely it's not a good idea to assume that it's the same thread. – Jeremy Apr 21 '15 at 15:14
  • Obviously, I meant that it is often a good idea to do all static initialization in the primary (main) thread. There can be situation where this is impossible and the initialization must happen later (dynamic loading, lazy instantiation, etc.) – Patrick O'Hara Apr 21 '15 at 15:17

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