9

If I assign a value to a floating point computation to a variable first, then assign that to an unsigned int with implicit type casting, I get one answer. But if I assign the same computation directly to the unsigned int, again with implicit type casting, I get a different answer.

Below is sample code I compiled and ran to demonstrate:

#include <iostream>



int
main( int argc, char** argv )
{
    float   payloadInTons = 6550.3;


    //  Above, payloadInTons is given a value.
    //  Below, two different ways are used to type cast that same value,
    //  but the results do not match.
    float tempVal = payloadInTons * 10.0;
    unsigned int right = tempVal;
    std::cout << "    right = " << right << std::endl;


    unsigned int rawPayloadN = payloadInTons * 10.0;
    std::cout << "    wrong = " << rawPayloadN << std::endl;


    return 0;
}

Does anyone have insight into why "right" is right, and "wrong" is wrong?

By the way, I am using gcc 4.8.2 on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, if it matters.

5
  • 3
    It would be a bit more ... impressive if you also included the output you're seeing. On ideone.com I got right = 65503 wrong = 65502.
    – unwind
    Apr 21, 2015 at 15:55
  • 3
    This has the C tag, but it looks like C++. Apr 21, 2015 at 15:55
  • 2
    It's because of precision. If you multiply both by 100.0 instead of 10.0, you will understand it.
    – Arun A S
    Apr 21, 2015 at 15:57
  • @SamuelEdwinWard looks like? Apr 21, 2015 at 15:57
  • Good observations, all.
    – donjuedo
    Apr 21, 2015 at 16:01

2 Answers 2

7

You are using double literals. With proper float literals, everything's fine.

int
main( int argc, char** argv )
{
    float   payloadInTons = 6550.3f;
    float tempVal = payloadInTons * 10.0f;

    unsigned int right = tempVal;
    std::cout << "     right = " << right << std::endl;

    unsigned int rawPayloadN = payloadInTons * 10.0f;
    std::cout << "also right = " << rawPayloadN << std::endl;


    return 0;
}

Output :

     right = 65503
also right = 65503
2
  • Alternatively, one could use doubles everywhere, I think. Apr 21, 2015 at 16:04
  • @SamuelEdwinWard of course. As long as it is everywhere, such discrepancies won't happen.
    – Quentin
    Apr 21, 2015 at 16:05
6

After accept answer

This is not a double vs. float issue. It is a binary floating-point and conversion to int/unsigned issue.

Typical float uses binary32 representation with does not give exact representation of values like 6550.3.

float payloadInTons = 6550.3;
// payloadInTons has the exact value of `6550.2998046875`.

Multiplying by 10.0, below, insures the calculation is done with at least double precision with an exact result of 65502.998046875. The product is then converted back to float. The double value is not exactly representable in float and so is rounded to the best float with an exact value of 65503.0. Then tempVal converts right as desired with a value of 65503.

float tempVal = payloadInTons * 10.0;
unsigned int right = tempVal;

Multiplying by 10.0, below, insures the calculation is done with at least double precision with an exact result of 65502.998046875 just as before. This time, the value is converted directly to unsigned rawPayloadN with the undesired with a value of 65502. This is because the value in truncated and not rounded.

unsigned int rawPayloadN = payloadInTons * 10.0;

The first “worked” because of the conversion was double to float to unsigned. This involves 2 conversions with is usually bad. In this case, 2 wrongs made a right.


Solution

Had code tried float payloadInTons = 6550.29931640625; (the next smallest float number) both result would have been 65502.

The "right” way to convert a floating point value to some integer type is often to round the result and then perform the type conversion.

float tempVal = payloadInTons * 10.0;
unsigned int right = roundf(tempVal);

Note: This entire issue is complication by the value of FLT_EVAL_METHOD. If user’s value is non-zero, floating point calculation may occur at higher precision than expected.

printf("FLT_EVAL_METHOD %d\n", (int) FLT_EVAL_METHOD);
3
  • 1
    I understand your explanation, and like the deterministic use of roundf() for future use.
    – donjuedo
    Apr 21, 2015 at 18:44
  • @donjuedo The point is that using proper float literals may not solve the problem. Depending on FLT_EVAL_METHOD, payloadInTons * 10.0f and payloadInTons * 10.0 may result in the exact same code. The primary issue is that values near 6550.3 are expected to have a result of 65503. This will not occur with using "proper literals" but by using rounding. Apr 21, 2015 at 18:55
  • 1
    Right. For me, there are two points, the one I stated (why it's different), and the one I didn't, but you helped me with (how to make it reliable). The first had to do with my incorrect premise, that all the computation was done with float. I could see how conversion to int could be flawed, but missed how two ways of using float got 2 answers. One actually used doubles I was not aware of, hence the difference. I agree with you, that using "proper literals" is not the robust way to get the right result every time.
    – donjuedo
    Apr 21, 2015 at 19:32

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