2

Using BASH, I need to transform the csv output I receive from a data source into a different format to make it easier to import into SQL server.

The source format is a single row with one data point then a comma then any number of hosts separated by a colon.

The target format is a data point then a comma then one of the hosts on a line. Then the next line would be the same data point then a comma then the next host.

Basically I need to change from 1 row per data point and numerous colon separated hosts to multiple rows per data point, with only one of the hosts per row

Source format:

data1,host1:host2
data2,host4:host5:host6
data3,host4:host7:host1:host5:host9

I need

data1,host1
data1,host2
data2,host4
date2,host5
data2,host6
data3,host4
data3,host7
data3,host1
data3,host5
data3,host9
  • Thank you for reformatting my question fedorqui. – CES Apr 21 '15 at 16:14
  • no problem :) You can edit it yourself using the "edit" button and the tools the editor offers. – fedorqui Apr 21 '15 at 16:17
  • @CES You can accept the answer that solved your problem. See here for details. – Pang Apr 26 '15 at 10:37
1

Since the format is like

field1,subfield1:subfield2:...

and has to become

field1,subfield1
field1,subfield2
field1,...

I would use...

awk 'BEGIN {FS=OFS=","}
     {n=split($2,a,":")
      for (i=1; i<=n; i++) print $1, a[i]}' file

This sets the field separator to the comma. Then, it explodes the second field on colons. Since split returns the number of pieces, then it is a matter of looping through the extracted values.

Test

$ awk 'BEGIN {FS=OFS=","} {n=split($2,a,":"); for (i=1; i<=n; i++) print $1, a[i]}' a
data1,host1
data1,host2
data2,host4
data2,host5
data2,host6
data3,host4
data3,host7
data3,host1
data3,host5
data3,host9
  • It looks like I screwed up my own question. To use a more specific set of data. there are 3 columns of data, not just 2. hardware1,data1,host1:host2:host3 hardware1,data2,host3:host4:host7 hardware1,data3,host9:host3:host1 hardware2,data4,host1:host3:host5 hardware2,data5,host8:host2:host1 – CES Apr 21 '15 at 17:07
  • Did it solve your problem, @CES ? Since you're new here, please don't forget to mark the answer accepted if your problem is already solved. You can do it clicking on the check mark beside the answer to toggle it from hollow to green. See Help Center > Asking if you have any question! – fedorqui Apr 22 '15 at 7:54
1

Here are 3 ways:

awk -F'[,:]' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) print $1","$i}' source.file

perl -F'[,:]' -lane '$d=shift @F; print "$d,$_" for @F' source.file

while IFS=",:" read -ra fields; do
     for ((i=1; i<"${#fields[@]}"; i++)); do
         echo "${fields[0]},${fields[i]}"
     done
done < source.file
  • thank you. Not sure if you saw but I screwed up my own question. I actually have 3 columns, not 2. see the comment in the above answer where I explain them – CES Apr 21 '15 at 17:19
  • @CES You have to do by yourself even a minimum. awk ... i=3; i<=NF; i++) print $2 ... – Costas Apr 21 '15 at 17:47
  • @CES, if you want to change your requirements, edit the question. Don't leave clues scattered around in comments. I think fedorqui and I have given you enough to go on. If you have specific questions about the code I've given you, then come back and leave a comment about it. – glenn jackman Apr 21 '15 at 17:54
  • yes sorry, new here. Both of you have provided excellent information. I tried to bump the score but it won't let me. what has been provided fixed my issue. I am greatly appreciative. – CES Apr 21 '15 at 18:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.