44

It's said that the "leave" instruction is similar to:

movl %ebp, %esp
popl %ebp

I understand the movl %ebp, %esp part, and that it acts to release stored up memory (as discussed in this question).

But what is the purpose of the popl %ebp code?

4
  • 27
    It pops ebp .
    – user253751
    Apr 22, 2015 at 8:47
  • 1
    I'm voting to close this because it's confusing what's being asked. You specifically ask about pop %ebp and that has a meaning outside of LEAVE making this question very compound. Your question on LEAVE is also a definite dupe. So we need to know what exactly is the question here and to keep it atomic. Oct 9, 2018 at 18:58
  • Interestingly this is almost a direct dupe of this question stackoverflow.com/questions/41907672/… Oct 9, 2018 at 19:00
  • FYI: movl %ebp, %esp is AT&T syntax and means esp=ebp. movl %esp, %ebp would be the Intel syntax equivalent.
    – Thomas
    Nov 27, 2021 at 14:15

2 Answers 2

81

LEAVE is the counterpart to ENTER. The ENTER instruction sets up a stack frame by first pushing EBP onto the stack and then copies ESP into EBP, so LEAVE has to do the opposite, i.e. copy EBP to ESP and then restore the old EBP from the stack.

See the section named PROCEDURE CALLS FOR BLOCK-STRUCTURED LANGUAGES in Intel's Software Developer's Manual Vol 1 if you want to read more about how ENTER and LEAVE work.


enter n,0 is exactly equivalent to (and should be replaced with)

push  %ebp
mov   %esp, %ebp     # ebp = esp,  mov  ebp,esp in Intel syntax
sub   $n, %esp       # allocate space on the stack.  Omit if n=0

leave is exactly equivalent to

mov   %ebp, %esp     # esp = ebp,  mov  esp,ebp in Intel syntax
pop   %ebp

enter is very slow and compilers don't use it, but leave is fine. (http://agner.org/optimize). Compilers do use leave if they make a stack frame at all (at least gcc does). But if esp is already equal to ebp, it's most efficient to just pop ebp.

8
  • It seems like I don't understand the concept of EBP and ESP. Could you please explain both of these terms for me?
    – alexswo
    Apr 22, 2015 at 7:20
  • 2
    EBP and ESP are both just 32-bit general-purpose registers. Although ESP has a special function, which is to act as the stack pointer, and it gets implicitly modified by certain instructions (e.g. push, pop, call). EBP by convention is typically used as a stack frame pointer within functions.
    – Michael
    Apr 22, 2015 at 7:28
  • 1
  • 6
    To expand on this answer, LEAVE or ENTER are not dependent on each other. That is, you can have one without the other, but the associated ASM must be present (either using these two instructions or explicitly including equivalent instructions).
    – sherrellbc
    Aug 13, 2017 at 16:38
  • 1
    No(see my answer). The base pointer is the bottom of the stack, & the stack pointer is the top.
    – JustinCB
    Apr 27, 2018 at 0:11
8

The popl instruction restores the base pointer, and the movl instruction restores the stack pointer. The base pointer is the bottom of the stack, and the stack pointer is the top. Before the leave instruction, the stack looks like this:

----Bottom of Caller's stack----
...
Caller's
Variables
...
Function Parameters
----Top of Caller's Stack/Bottom of Callee's stack----   (%ebp)
...
Callee's
Variables
...
---Bottom of Callee's stack----    (%esp)

After the movl %ebp %esp, which deallocates the callee's stack, the stack looks like this:

----Bottom of Caller's stack----
...
Caller's
Variables
...
Function Parameters
----Top of Caller's Stack/Bottom of Callee's stack----   (%ebp) and (%esp)

After the popl %ebp, which restores the caller's stack, the stack looks like this:

----Bottom of Caller's stack----    (%ebp)
...
Caller's
Variables
...
Function Parameters
----Top of Caller's Stack----   (%esp)

The enter instruction saves the bottom of the caller's stack and sets the base pointer so that the callee can allocate their stack.

Also note, that, while most C compilers allocate the stack this way(at least with optimization turn'd off), if you write an assembly language function, you can just use the same stack frame if you want to, but you have to be sure to pop everything off the stack that you push on it or else you'll jump to a junk address when you return(this is because call <somewhere> means push <ret address>[or push %eip], jmp <somewhere>, and ret means jump to the address on the top of the stack[or pop %eip]. %eip is the register that holds the address of the current instruction).

4
  • A code block would probably look better for your ASCII diagrams than ragged back-tick lines. You have some HTML elements inside backticks in the last paragraph. And BTW most C compilers don't waste instructions making stack frames at all; -fomit-frame-pointer has been gcc's default for years even on 32-bit x86 (with optimization enabled of course). Apr 27, 2018 at 0:19
  • I didn't say it wasted instructions, just pointing out that you don't have to(a lot of C references say it's done that way). Also, I did use <code> tags for the ASCII diagrams.
    – JustinCB
    Apr 27, 2018 at 0:35
  • No, I mean Stack Overflow code formatting: select your block and hit control-k, or click the {} icon. Re: compilers: I was commenting on your while C compilers almost always allocate the stack this way, that compilers don't do that. And BTW, you probably shouldn't use code formatting for pop everything off the stack, because you shouldn't use the pop instruction just to increment esp by more than 4, just add $12, %esp or whatever. pop %ecx is often good if you only need it once, though. Apr 27, 2018 at 0:39
  • I fixed the formatting for you to use Stack Overflow's markdown. It supports some HTML, but for example &lt; isn't processed within backticks, and might not be processed at all. Welcome to SO :) Apr 27, 2018 at 0:43

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