3

I have the following method:

public void Set<T>(IEnumerable<T> records)
{
     foreach (var record in records)
     {
        Set(record);
     }
 }

I would like either one of the following Set methods to be called, depending on T:

    public void Set(RecordType1 record)
    {
        // Some RecordType1 logic
    }

    public void Set(RecordType2 record)
    {
        // Some logic applicable to RecordType2 only
    }

Hopefully, you can see that I'm attempting allow which Set method to called to be inferred at runtime. This "isn't working" (i.e. won't compile as it's expecting RecordType1).

Question

How can I keep this kind of structure without testing for a type before sending the records off to the Set method?

13

Why don't you create an interface (IRecordType), allow RecordType1 and RecordType2 to inherit it, then move the main logic of each Set method to the interface.

public interface IRecordType
{
    void Set(...);
}
public void Set(IEnumerable<IRecordType> records)
{
    foreach (var record in records)
    {
        record.Set(...);
    }
}

This is a more maintainable solution. And it also allows for better polymorphism.

Edit: Resource to look at: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/3b5b8ezk%28v=vs.90%29.aspx

Also, little sidebar: with interfaces you can not only share certain methods, but properties and events, as well. If RecordType1 and RecordType2 share several common properties, you can add those properties to the interface, and then use IRecordType wherever you would have previously needed to distinguish between the two for use of these properties, methods or events. Likewise, the code inside any of those properties, methods or events is permitted to rely on other properties, methods, events or fields that are specific to the object itself. This is the purpose of Object-Oriented languages (C#) and polymorphism.

Edit: As a result of the discussion in the comments, I also wanted to add more information about the decision between using an OOP approach (interface, abstract class, class) and the dynamic approach StriplingWarrior suggested:

If you don't have access to the actual implementation details of RecordType1 or RecordType2, or you are unable to alter the design of your application (due to the impeding reliance on the Set(RecordType1) and Set(RecordType2) methods, you may find it more fruitful to take his approach of using dynamic. There are also other options out there that we may not have thought of - you could always give one of them a go. The downside to the dynamic approach is that it requires .NET 4.0.

Also, more considerations: if you do have access to RecordType1 and RecordType2 implementation details, but cannot change Set(RecordType1) and Set(RecordType2) as far as definition, you could always modify the body of them:

public void Set(RecordType1 record)
{
    record.Set(...);
}

public void Set(RecordType2 record)
{
    record.Set(...);
}

This preserves the ENTIRE application structure, while also decreasing code maintenance and allowing for polymorphism.

  • 3
    Your answer and OP's code are very different. OP didn't call Set method in T but the current class. Not sure why this is heavily upvoted :\ – Sriram Sakthivel Apr 22 '15 at 15:14
  • 2
    @SriramSakthivel I know, the OP's method is also not a good example of Object-Orientation. My solution is to provide the OP with a more maintainable project in the end, not just an answer to his question, but a solution to a more under-lying problem. – Der Kommissar Apr 22 '15 at 15:15
  • 2
    That's not always possible(if types belong to third parties). We need to use adapter pattern or some other kind in that case. However, I like your answer. +1 :) – Sriram Sakthivel Apr 22 '15 at 15:24
  • 1
    I agree with @SriramSakthivel here. I'm not upvoting you because what you describe is not a direct answer to the question, but a redesign of his application. I am of the opinion that answers should first and foremost answer the question directly, and then elaborate on other possible solutions to the problem as a side note. StriplingWarrior's post is a much better "answer" than yours in that respect. Keep in mind I do not disagree with what you said in the slightest (I think it's all valuable information, just not the answer to the question). – julealgon Apr 22 '15 at 15:30
  • 1
    @julealgon Yes, that is one of the unfortunate downfalls of my approach, the application requires extensive redesign. Cases such as that merit that StriplingWarrior's approach to be the most optimal. Or other cases that compare the typeof each object. Those cases, however, do not meet the requirements of the OP: that is, the decision is at runtime. – Der Kommissar Apr 22 '15 at 15:39
7

If you're positive that every item in the given collection will match a method signature, you can cast the values as dynamic and let the runtime figure out what to bind it to:

 foreach (var record in records)
 {
    Set((dynamic)record);
 }

However, this is highly error prone, and I'd recommend you take a hard look at what you're really trying to accomplish. There's most likely a better pattern to accommodate your needs.

  • Thanks a lot, much appreciated. Always interested to see where dynamic can sit in my code. Your answer is spot on, but as EBrown has indicated - there's obviously a floor in how I'm approaching this overall. – user1017882 Apr 22 '15 at 15:17
  • @DeeMac Not necessarily, there are times when this solution is ideal over the one I provided, you need to take the following considerations: if the code in the Set methods does not describe a manipulation of the object itself, you should likely use this method. However, I suspect that your Set method heavily describes a manipulation of the object itself, and as such it should be inside the object it is manipulating. – Der Kommissar Apr 22 '15 at 15:21
  • @DeeMac Also, as SriramSakthivel suggested in the comments on my answer: if you do not have access to the source code for RecordType1 or RecordType2, you are somewhat better off with this method, as it does not require the adjustment/modification of the object definitions themselves. – Der Kommissar Apr 22 '15 at 15:29

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