4

I have a console application. In release environment, it works perfectly at this time. When in IDE debug environment, I don't want the console window close, so I added this function, and calling it in the very end of my program.

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
public static void DebugWaitAKey(string message = "Press any key")
{
    Console.WriteLine(message);
    Console.ReadKey();
}

It works well for me, when I debug my program. But with unit testing, it still wait for a key before exiting!

The work-around is only unit-testing release edition of my program, or test other functions. But I do want something can identify current session is under unit testing, and use that flag in this function.

4

I believe this should answer your question. I took a class from there and adapted it to your situation.

/// <summary>
/// Detects if we are running inside a unit test.
/// </summary>
public static class UnitTestDetector
{
    static UnitTestDetector()
    {
        string testAssemblyName = "Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.UnitTestFramework";
    UnitTestDetector.IsInUnitTest = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()
        .Any(a => a.FullName.StartsWith(testAssemblyName));
    }

    public static bool IsInUnitTest { get; private set; }
}

Then I added a line to your method which if it is running a test it will not hit the Console.ReadKey();

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
public static void DebugWaitAKey(string message = "Press any key")
{
    Console.WriteLine(message);
    if(!UnitTestDetector.IsInUnitTest)
        Console.ReadKey();
}

Note: This would be considered a hack and would not be considered a best practice.

EDIT: I also created a sample project on github to demonstrate this code. https://github.com/jeffweiler8770/UnitTest

  • This works. You even include bin & obj in github? :-) – Herbert Yu Apr 22 '15 at 18:37
  • I wasn't trying to do that, and I'm pretty new to putting stuff on github. :-) – Jeff Apr 22 '15 at 18:45
1

The simple way if your test runs from a dedicated UnitTest project : use a flag in AppSettings...

I would not investigate around patterns for such a purpose, i would run the test in a dedicated UnitTest project with its own configuration.

If you need to collect data maybe should you simply use traces (they can be customized from your .config file)... ?

Hope this helps...

  • This will increase configuration work. And my expectation is 100% automation. – Herbert Yu Apr 22 '15 at 18:40
1

Rather than looking for whether the program was compiled in debug mode, you can look at whether a debugger is attached:

if (Debugger.IsAttached)
{
    Console.WriteLine(message);
    Console.ReadKey();
}

Note this will only detect if you start with F5 from Visual Studio, not Ctrl-F5 (i.e. Start with Debugging only)

  • I meant CTRL-F5. – Richard Apr 22 '15 at 20:47
  • [Conditional("DEBUG")] served the same purpose as your Debugger.IsAttached – Herbert Yu Apr 23 '15 at 22:29
  • No it wouldn't. The conditional attribute checks whether the program was compiled in debug mode (ie. the DEBUG symbol is present). Mine checks for whether a debugger is attached. – Richard Apr 24 '15 at 6:08
  • Admittedly mine will still pause if you debug your unit tests! But for normal running, this works fine. I use it in my programs simply because the console window closes by default if you use the debugger. – Richard Apr 24 '15 at 7:08
0

I used a variation of Jeff's UnitTestDetector. I did not want to check the unit test assembly and wanted to control which unit tests would consider this or not.

So I created a simple class with IsInUnitTest defaulting to false. Then in the unit test classes where I wanted the conditional code to run I added TestInitializer and TestCleanup where I set the bool accordingly.

Then in my regular code I can use UnitTestDetector.IsInUnitTest

Simple UnitTestDetector class:

/// <summary>
/// Detects if we are running inside a unit test.
/// </summary>
public static class UnitTestDetector
{
    static private bool _isInUnitTest = false;
    public static bool IsInUnitTest
    {
        get { return _isInUnitTest; }
        set { _isInUnitTest = value; }
    }
}

Unit Test to Test this stuff:

[TestClass]
public class UnitTestDetectorTest_WithoutIsInUnitTest
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void IsInUnitTest_WithoutUnitTestAttribute_False()
    {
        bool expected = false;
        bool actual = UnitTestDetector.IsInUnitTest;
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
    }
}

[TestClass]
public class UnitTestDetectorTest_WithIsInUnitTest
{
    [TestInitialize()]
    public void Initialize()
    {
        UnitTestDetector.IsInUnitTest = true;
    }

    [TestCleanup()]
    public void Cleanup()
    {
        UnitTestDetector.IsInUnitTest = false;
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void IsInUnitTest_WithUnitTestAttribute_True()
    {
        bool expected = true;
        bool actual = UnitTestDetector.IsInUnitTest;
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
    }
}

Condition in Code:

if (UnitTestDetector.IsInUnitTest)
            return "Hey I'm in the unit test :)";

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