I want to read the onClick event value properties. But when I click on it, I see something like this on the console:

SyntheticMouseEvent {dispatchConfig: Object, dispatchMarker: ".1.1.0.2.0.0:1", nativeEvent: MouseEvent, type: "click", target

My code is working correctly. When I run I can see {column} but can't get it in the onClick event.

My Code:

var HeaderRows = React.createClass({
    handleSort:  function(value) {
       console.log(value);
    },
    render: function () {
        var that = this;
        return(
        <tr>
            {this.props.defaultColumns.map(function (column) {
                return (
                    <th value={column} onClick={that.handleSort} >{column}</th>
                );
            })}
            {this.props.externalColumns.map(function (column) {
                // Multi dimension array - 0 is column name
                var externalColumnName = column[0];
                return ( <th>{externalColumnName}</th>
                );
            })}

        </tr>);
    }
});

How can I pass a value to the onClick event in React js?

  • 2
    possible duplicate of OnClick Event binding in React.js – WiredPrairie Apr 23 '15 at 0:11
  • 2
    consider using self instead of that. That is fairly misleading as it should be synonymous with "this" (not important really though, to each his own) – Dan Jun 30 '17 at 14:53
  • Using bind method and arrow method we can pass the value to Onclick event – Merugu Prashanth Sep 12 '17 at 7:49

22 Answers 22

up vote 742 down vote accepted

Easy Way

Use an arrow function:

return (
  <th value={column} onClick={() => this.handleSort(column)}>{column}</th>
);

This will create a new function that calls handleSort with the right params.

Better Way

Extract it into a sub-component. The problem with using an arrow function in the render call is it will create a new function every time, which ends up causing unneeded re-renders.

If you create a sub-component, you can pass handler and use props as the arguments, which will then re-render only when the props change (because the handler reference now never changes):

Sub-component

class TableHeader extends Component {
  handleClick = () => {
    this.props.onHeaderClick(this.props.value);
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <th onClick={this.handleClick}>
        {this.props.column}
      </th>
    );
  }
}

Main component

{this.props.defaultColumns.map((column) => (
  <TableHeader
    value={column}
    onHeaderClick={this.handleSort}
  />
))}

Old Easy Way (ES5)

Use .bind to pass the parameter you want:

return (
  <th value={column} onClick={that.handleSort.bind(that, column)}>{column}</th>
);
  • 6
    react gives warning when i use like your code. I change my code to onClick={that.onClick.bind(null,column)} – user1924375 Apr 23 '15 at 9:13
  • 11
    How would you use this with a <a> tag where you need to pass the event, in order to use preventDefault() – Simon H Oct 24 '15 at 9:43
  • 35
    @SimonH The event will be passed as the last argument, after the arguments you pass via bind. – Smudge Nov 4 '15 at 17:26
  • 35
    Is this not bad for performance? wont a new function be created on each render? – AndrewMcLagan May 17 '16 at 7:44
  • 9
    @AndrewMcLagan It is. I found this to describe the rule and the most performant solution. – E. Sundin Jul 3 '16 at 22:46

Nowadays, with ES6, I feel we could use an updated answer.

return (
  <th value={column} onClick={()=>this.handleSort(column)} >{column}</th>
);

Basically, (for any that don't know) since onClick is expecting a function passed to it, bind works because it creates a copy of a function. Instead we can pass an arrow function expression that simply invokes the function we want, and preserves this. You should never need to bind the render method in React, but if for some reason you're losing this in one of your component methods:

constructor(props) {
  super(props);
  this.myMethod = this.myMethod.bind(this);
}
  • 4
    You never need to bind render() because it is called by React. If anything, you need to bind the event handlers, and only when you are not using arrows. – Dan Abramov Mar 2 '16 at 13:46
  • 1
    @DanAbramov I think you are correct, but I included it just in case - updated with an example that doesn't implicitly encourage binding render. – aikeru Mar 2 '16 at 13:50
  • 2
    Note it’s also best to pass props to super() or this.props will be undefined during constructor which can get confusing. – Dan Abramov Mar 2 '16 at 13:55
  • 2
    To achieve what? You can define a handler inside functional component and pass it. It will be a different function every render so if you have determined with a profiler that it gives you perf issues (and only if you’re actually sure in this!), consider using a class instead. – Dan Abramov Apr 19 '16 at 23:04
  • 1
    @me-me Yes, and if you opt-in to bleeding edge JavaScript in Babel you should just declare properties on your class like foo = () => {...} and then reference in render <button onClick={this.foo}... the only reason to include an arrow function if you use babel in this way, IMO, is if you want to capture some variable that only exists in render() method scope (events can just be passed along and don't apply). – aikeru May 24 at 17:14

[[h/t to @E.Sundin for linking this in a comment]

The top answer (anonymous functions or binding) will work, but it's not the most performant, as it creates a copy of the event handler for every instance generated by the map() function.

This is an explanation of the optimal way to do it from the ESLint-plugin-react:

Lists of Items

A common use case of bind in render is when rendering a list, to have a separate callback per list item:

const List = props => (
      <ul>
        {props.items.map(item =>
          <li key={item.id} onClick={() => console.log(item.id)}>
            ...
          </li>
        )}
      </ul>
    );

Rather than doing it this way, pull the repeated section into its own component:

const List = props => (
      <ul>
        {props.items.map(item =>
          <ListItem 
            key={item.id} 
            item={item} 
            onItemClick={props.onItemClick} // assume this is passed down to List
           />
        )}
      </ul>
    );


const ListItem = props => {
  const _onClick = () => {
    console.log(props.item.id);
  }
    return (
      <li onClick={_onClick}>
        ...
      </li>
    );

});

This will speed up rendering, as it avoids the need to create new functions (through bind calls) on every render.

  • Does react invoke those functions with call/apply, then, under the hood, and avoid using bind internally? – aikeru Aug 12 '16 at 15:07
  • 1
    Is there a way to doing this using a stateless component? – Carlos Martinez May 9 '17 at 13:50
  • 2
    @CarlosMartinez good eye, i updated the example--they should've been stateless functional components (SFC) in the first place. Generally, if a component doesn't ever use this.state, you can safely swap it out with an SFC. – Brandon May 9 '17 at 14:46
  • 2
    Hmm, I don't get how this is more performant? Won't the ListItem function be invoked every time, and thus the _onClick function will be created every render. – Mattias Petter Johansson May 19 '17 at 21:04
  • I'm far from an expert here, but as I understand it, in the 'correct' pattern, there's only one instance of the handler and it's passed the prop for whichever instance of the component calls it. In the bind example (ie, the 'wrong' pattern), there's one instance of the handler for every instantiated component. It's sort of the memory equivalent of writing the same function thirty times vice writing it once & calling it where needed. – Brandon May 19 '17 at 21:27

There are nice answers here, and i agree with @Austin Greco (the second option with separate components) but i'm surprised no one has mentioned currying.
What you can do is create a function that accept a parameter (your parameter) and returns another function that accepts another parameter (the click event in this case). then you are free to do with it what ever you want.

ES5:

handleChange(param) { // param is the argument you passed to the function
    return function (e) { // e is the event object that returned

    };
}

ES6:

handleChange = param => e => {
    // param is the argument you passed to the function
    // e is the event object that returned
};

And you will use it this way:

<input 
    type="text" 
    onChange={this.handleChange(someParam)} 
/>

Here is a full example of such usage:

const styles = {
  fontFamily: "sans-serif",
  textAlign: "center"
};

const someArr = ["A", "B", "C", "D"];

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      valueA: "",
      valueB: "some initial value",
      valueC: "",
      valueD: "blah blah"
    };
  }

  handleChange = param => e => {
    const nextValue = e.target.value;
    this.setState({ ["value" + param]: nextValue });
  };

  render() {
    return (
      <div style={styles}>
        {someArr.map(obj => {
          return (
            <div>
              <label>
                {`input ${obj}   `}
              </label>
              <input
                type="text"
                value={this.state["value" + obj]}
                onChange={this.handleChange(obj)}
              />
              <br />
              <br />
            </div>
          );
        })}
      </div>
    );
  }
}
ReactDOM.render( < App / > , document.getElementById("root"));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>
<div id="root"></div>

Note that this approach doesn't solve the creation of a new instance on each render.
I like this approach over the other inline handlers as this one is more concise and readable in my opinion.

Edit:
As suggested in the comments below, you can cache / memoize the result of the function.

  • 7
    This should be the accepted answer. REALLY easy to implement and you don't need to create any other components or bind differently. Thank you! – Tamb Aug 4 '17 at 16:28
  • 9
    Looks better, but from a performance perspective though, currying doesn't really help, because if you call handleChange twice, with the same param, you get two functions that the JS engine consider to be separate objects, even if they do the same thing. So you still get a re-render. For the sake of performance, you would need to cache the results of handleChange to get the performance advantage. Like handleChange = param => cache[param] || (e => { // the function body }) – travellingprog Aug 26 '17 at 1:38
  • 4
    This is the perfect answer if you fulfill the advice from @travellingprog – llioor Dec 20 '17 at 10:54
  • 2
    Can anyone provide a link or explain how this caching mechanism works ? thanks. – Sadok Mtir Jan 26 at 16:02
  • 1
    Beautiful and neat ! – Hatem Alimam Feb 17 at 11:23

This is my approach, not sure how bad it is, please comment

In the clickable element

return (
    <th value={column} onClick={that.handleSort} data-column={column}>   {column}</th>
);

and then

handleSort(e){
    this.sortOn(e.currentTarget.getAttribute('data-column'));
}
  • This is an approach I was thinking of, it feels a little hacky but avoids creating a new component. I am not sure if getAttribute is better or worse perf-wise compared to pulling into a separate component. – kamranicus Mar 15 '17 at 5:00
  • I think it's a good solution because it is very simple. But it works only with string values, if you want an object it doesn't work. – Stephane L Mar 16 at 16:41
  • For an object you would need to do encodeURIComponent(JSON.stringify(myObj)), then to parse it, JSON.parse(decodeURIComponent(myObj)). For functions I'm pretty sure this wont work without eval or new Function(), both of which should be avoided. For these reasons I don't use data-attributes to pass data in React/JS. – NathanCH Apr 20 at 22:42
  • I want to add I don't use this often and only for minor things. But usually I just create a component and pass the data as props to it. Then either handle the click inside that new component or pass a onClick function to the component. Like is explained in Brandon answer – Santiago Ramirez May 4 at 8:54

this example might be little different from yours. but i can assure you that this is the best solution you can have for this problem. i have searched for days for a solution which has no performance issue. and finally came up with this one.

class HannadComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.state={
       name:'MrRehman',
    };
    this.handleClick= this.handleClick.bind(this);
  }

  handleClick(event) {
    const { param } = e.target.dataset;
    console.log(param);
    //do what you want to do with the parameter
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <h3 data-param="value what you wanted to pass" onClick={this.handleClick}>
          {this.state.name}
        </h3>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

UPDATE

incase you want to deal with objects that are supposed to be the parameters. you can use JSON.stringify(object) to convert to it to string and add to the data set.

return (
          <div>
            <h3 data-param={JSON.stringify({name:'me'})} onClick={this.handleClick}>
              {this.state.name}
            </h3>
          </div>
        );
  • 1
    this does not work when the data passed is an object – SlimSim Aug 19 '17 at 18:04
  • use JSON.stringify to fix the issue. @SlimSim . that should do the trick – hannad rehman Aug 21 '17 at 9:21
  • If you need to use JSON.stringify for this problem then its probably not the correct method. The process of stringification takes a lot of memory. – KFE Nov 3 '17 at 13:54
  • in most of the cases you would only pass ID as params, and get the object details based on that ID from your source object. and why and how does it take a lot of memory, i know JSON stringify is slow, but the click Fn is async and it will have no or 0 effect on dom, once constructed – hannad rehman Nov 3 '17 at 13:56

One more option not involving .bind or ES6 is to use a child component with a handler to call the parent handler with the necessary props. Here's an example (and a link to working example is below):

var HeaderRows = React.createClass({
  handleSort:  function(value) {
     console.log(value);
  },
  render: function () {
      var that = this;
      return(
          <tr>
              {this.props.defaultColumns.map(function (column) {
                  return (
                      <TableHeader value={column} onClick={that.handleSort} >
                        {column}
                      </TableHeader>
                  );
              })}
              {this.props.externalColumns.map(function (column) {
                  // Multi dimension array - 0 is column name
                  var externalColumnName = column[0];
                  return ( <th>{externalColumnName}</th>
                  );
              })}
          </tr>);
      )
  }
});

// A child component to pass the props back to the parent handler
var TableHeader = React.createClass({
  propTypes: {
    value: React.PropTypes.string,
    onClick: React.PropTypes.func
  },
  render: function () {
    return (
      <th value={this.props.value} onClick={this._handleClick}
        {this.props.children}
      </th>
    )        
  },
  _handleClick: function () {
    if (this.props.onClick) {
      this.props.onClick(this.props.value);
    }
  }
});

The basic idea is for the parent component to pass the onClick function to a child component. The child component calls the onClick function and can access any props passed to it (and the event), allowing you to use any event value or other props within the parent's onClick function.

Here's a CodePen demo showing this method in action.

class extends React.Component {
    onClickDiv = (column) => {
        // do stuff
    }
    render() {
        return <div onClick={() => this.onClickDiv('123')} />
    }
}
  • 2
    The same - new DOM on each render. So React will update DOM each time. – Alex Shwarc Apr 11 '17 at 17:02

I wrote a wrapper component that can be reused for this purpose that builds on the accepted answers here. If all you need to do is pass a string however, then just add a data-attribute and read it from e.target.dataset (like some others have suggested). By default my wrapper will bind to any prop that is a function and starts with 'on' and automatically pass the data prop back to the caller after all the other event arguments. Although I haven't tested it for performance, it will give you the opportunity to avoid creating the class yourself, and it can be used like this:

const DataButton = withData('button')

const DataInput = withData('input');

or for Components and functions

const DataInput = withData(SomeComponent);

or if you prefer

const DataButton = withData(<button/>)

declare that Outside your container (near your imports)

Here is usage in a container:

import withData from './withData';
const DataInput = withData('input');

export default class Container extends Component {
    state = {
         data: [
             // ...
         ]
    }

    handleItemChange = (e, data) => {
        // here the data is available 
        // ....
    }

    render () {
        return (
            <div>
                {
                    this.state.data.map((item, index) => (
                        <div key={index}>
                            <DataInput data={item} onChange={this.handleItemChange} value={item.value}/>
                        </div>
                    ))
                }
            </div>
        );
    }
}

Here is the wrapper code 'withData.js:

import React, { Component } from 'react';

const defaultOptions = {
    events: undefined,
}

export default (Target, options) => {
    Target = React.isValidElement(Target) ? Target.type : Target;
    options = { ...defaultOptions, ...options }

    class WithData extends Component {
        constructor(props, context){
            super(props, context);
            this.handlers = getHandlers(options.events, this);        
        }

        render() {
            const { data, children, ...props } = this.props;
            return <Target {...props} {...this.handlers} >{children}</Target>;
        }

        static displayName = `withData(${Target.displayName || Target.name || 'Component'})`
    }

    return WithData;
}

function getHandlers(events, thisContext) {
    if(!events)
        events = Object.keys(thisContext.props).filter(prop => prop.startsWith('on') && typeof thisContext.props[prop] === 'function')
    else if (typeof events === 'string')
        events = [events];

    return events.reduce((result, eventType) => {
        result[eventType] = (...args) => thisContext.props[eventType](...args, thisContext.props.data);
        return result;
    }, {});
}

I have added code for onclick event value pass to the method in two ways . 1 . using bind method 2. using arrow(=>) method . see the methods handlesort1 and handlesort

var HeaderRows  = React.createClass({
    getInitialState : function() {
      return ({
        defaultColumns : ["col1","col2","col2","col3","col4","col5" ],
        externalColumns : ["ecol1","ecol2","ecol2","ecol3","ecol4","ecol5" ],

      })
    },
    handleSort:  function(column,that) {
       console.log(column);
       alert(""+JSON.stringify(column));
    },
    handleSort1:  function(column) {
       console.log(column);
       alert(""+JSON.stringify(column));
    },
    render: function () {
        var that = this;
        return(
        <div>
            <div>Using bind method</div>
            {this.state.defaultColumns.map(function (column) {
                return (
                    <div value={column} style={{height : '40' }}onClick={that.handleSort.bind(that,column)} >{column}</div>
                );
            })}
            <div>Using Arrow method</div>

            {this.state.defaultColumns.map(function (column) {
                return (
                    <div value={column} style={{height : 40}} onClick={() => that.handleSort1(column)} >{column}</div>

                );
            })}
            {this.state.externalColumns.map(function (column) {
                // Multi dimension array - 0 is column name
                var externalColumnName = column;
                return (<div><span>{externalColumnName}</span></div>
                );
            })}

        </div>);
    }
});

Making alternate attempt to answer OP's question including e.preventDefault() calls:

Rendered link (ES6)

<a href="#link" onClick={(e) => this.handleSort(e, 'myParam')}>

Component Function

handleSort = (e, param) => {
  e.preventDefault();
  console.log('Sorting by: ' + param)
}

I have below 3 suggestion to this on JSX onClick Events -

  1. Actually, we don't need to use .bind() or Arrow function in our code. You can simple use in your code.

  2. You can also move onClick event from th(or ul) to tr(or li) to improve the performance. Basically you will have n number of "Event Listeners" for your n li element.

    So finally code will look like this:
    <ul onClick={this.onItemClick}>
        {this.props.items.map(item =>
               <li key={item.id} data-itemid={item.id}>
                   ...
               </li>
          )}
    </ul>
    

    // And you can access item.id in onItemClick method as shown below:

    onItemClick = (event) => {
       console.log(e.target.getAttribute("item.id"));
    }
    
  3. I agree with the approach mention above for creating separate React Component for ListItem and List. This make code looks good however if you have 1000 of li then 1000 Event Listeners will be created. Please make sure you should not have much event listener.

    import React from "react";
    import ListItem from "./ListItem";
    export default class List extends React.Component {
    
        /**
        * This List react component is generic component which take props as list of items and also provide onlick
        * callback name handleItemClick
        * @param {String} item - item object passed to caller
        */
        handleItemClick = (item) => {
            if (this.props.onItemClick) {
                this.props.onItemClick(item);
            }
        }
    
        /**
        * render method will take list of items as a props and include ListItem component
        * @returns {string} - return the list of items
        */
        render() {
            return (
                <div>
                  {this.props.items.map(item =>
                      <ListItem key={item.id} item={item} onItemClick={this.handleItemClick}/>
                  )}
                </div>
            );
        }
    
    }
    
    
    import React from "react";
    
    export default class ListItem extends React.Component {
        /**
        * This List react component is generic component which take props as item and also provide onlick
        * callback name handleItemClick
        * @param {String} item - item object passed to caller
        */
        handleItemClick = () => {
            if (this.props.item && this.props.onItemClick) {
                this.props.onItemClick(this.props.item);
            }
        }
        /**
        * render method will take item as a props and print in li
        * @returns {string} - return the list of items
        */
        render() {
            return (
                <li key={this.props.item.id} onClick={this.handleItemClick}>{this.props.item.text}</li>
            );
        }
    }
    
  • 1
    This does not work when the data you need to pass is an object. The attribute will only work with strings. Also reading from the dom via get attribute is probably a more expensive operation. – SlimSim Aug 19 '17 at 17:38

Using arrow function :

You must install stage-2:

npm install babel-preset-stage-2 :

class App extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.state = {
            value=0
        }
    }

    changeValue = (data) => (e) => {
        alert(data);  //10
        this.setState({ [value]: data })
    }

    render() {
        const data = 10;
        return (
            <div>
                <input type="button" onClick={this.changeValue(data)} />
            </div>
        );
    }
}
export default App; 

There are 3 ways to handle this :-

  1. Bind the method in constructor as :-

    export class HeaderRows extends Component {
       constructor() {
           super();
           this.handleSort = this.handleSort.bind(this);
       }
    }
    
  2. Use the arrow function while creating it as :-

    handleSort = () => {
        // some text here
    }
    
  3. Third way is this :-

    <th value={column} onClick={() => that.handleSort} >{column}</th>
    

You can simply do it if you are using ES6.

export default class Container extends Component {
  state = {
    data: [
        // ...
    ]
  }

  handleItemChange = (e, data) => {
      // here the data is available 
      // ....
  }
  render () {
     return (
        <div>
        {
           this.state.data.map((item, index) => (
              <div key={index}>
                  <Input onChange={(event) => this.handItemChange(event, 
                         item)} value={item.value}/>
              </div>
           ))
        }
        </div>
     );
   }
 }

Implementing show total count from an object by passing count as a parameter from main to sub components as described below.

Here is MainComponent.js

import React, { Component } from "react";

import SubComp from "./subcomponent";

class App extends Component {

  getTotalCount = (count) => {
    this.setState({
      total: this.state.total + count
    })
  };

  state = {
    total: 0
  };

  render() {
    const someData = [
      { name: "one", count: 200 },
      { name: "two", count: 100 },
      { name: "three", count: 50 }
    ];
    return (
      <div className="App">
        {someData.map((nameAndCount, i) => {
          return (
            <SubComp
              getTotal={this.getTotalCount}
              name={nameAndCount.name}
              count={nameAndCount.count}
              key={i}
            />
          );
        })}
        <h1>Total Count: {this.state.total}</h1>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

export default App;

And Here is SubComp.js

import React, { Component } from 'react';
export default class SubComp extends Component {

  calculateTotal = () =>{
    this.props.getTotal(this.props.count);
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <p onClick={this.calculateTotal}> Name: {this.props.name} || Count: {this.props.count}</p>
      </div>
    )
  }
};

Try to implement above and you will get exact scenario that how pass parameters works in reactjs on any DOM method.

Below is the example which passes value on onClick event.

I used es6 syntax. remember in class component arrow function does not bind automatically, so explicitly binding in constructor.

class HeaderRows extends React.Component {

    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.handleSort = this.handleSort.bind(this);
    }

    handleSort(value) {
        console.log(value);
    }

    render() {
        return(
            <tr>
                {this.props.defaultColumns.map( (column, index) =>
                    <th value={ column } 
                        key={ index } 
                        onClick={ () => this.handleSort(event.target.value) }>
                        { column }
                    </th>
                )}

                {this.props.externalColumns.map((column, index)  =>
                    <th value ={ column[0] }
                        key={ index }>
                        {column[0]}
                    </th>
                )}
            </tr>
         );
    }
}

I guess you will have to bind the method to the React’s class instance. It’s safer to use a constructor to bind all methods in React. In your case when you pass the parameter to the method, the first parameter is used to bind the ‘this’ context of the method, thus you cannot access the value inside the method.

1. You just have to use an arrow function in the Onclick event like this: 

<th value={column} onClick={() => that.handleSort(theValue)} >{column}</th>

2.Then bind this in the constructor method:
    this.handleSort = this.handleSort.bind(this);

3.And finally get the value in the function:
  handleSort(theValue){
     console.log(theValue);
}

Theres' a very easy way.

 onClick={this.toggleStart('xyz')} . 
  toggleStart= (data) => (e) =>{
     console.log('value is'+data);  
 }

I think, .bind(this, arg1, arg2, ...) in React's map - is bad code, because it is slow! 10-50 of .bind(this) in single render method - very slow code.
I fix it like this:
Render method
<tbody onClick={this.handleClickRow}>
map of <tr data-id={listItem.id}>
Handler
var id = $(ev.target).closest('tr').data().id

Full code below:

class MyGrid extends React.Component {
  // In real, I get this from props setted by connect in Redux
  state = {
    list: [
      {id:1, name:'Mike'},
      {id:2, name:'Bob'},
      {id:3, name:'Fred'}
    ],
    selectedItemId: 3
  }
  
  render () {
    const { list, selectedItemId }  = this.state
    const { handleClickRow } = this

    return (
      <table>
        <tbody onClick={handleClickRow}>
          {list.map(listItem =>(
            <tr key={listItem.id} data-id={listItem.id} className={selectedItemId===listItem.id ? 'selected' : ''}>
              <td>{listItem.id}</td>
              <td>{listItem.name}</td>
            </tr>
          ))}
        </tbody>
      </table>
    )
  }
  
  handleClickRow = (ev) => {
    const target = ev.target
    // You can use what you want to find TR with ID, I use jQuery
    const dataset = $(target).closest('tr').data()
    if (!dataset || !dataset.id) return
    this.setState({selectedItemId:+dataset.id})
    alert(dataset.id) // Have fun!
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<MyGrid/>, document.getElementById("react-dom"))
table {
  border-collapse: collapse;
}

.selected td {
  background-color: rgba(0, 0, 255, 0.3);
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.0.2/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.0.2/react-dom.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<div id="react-dom"></div>

  • Please, write comments for what you minus – MiF Mar 1 '17 at 13:45
  • 2
    Mixing JQuery with React is not a recommended way of using React, especially if you're unit testing your code. The most idiomatic answer is to separate your list items into child components because they have actions that presumably affect application state. – kamranicus Mar 15 '17 at 5:04
  • I know, but it is just only for simplest demonstration of my solution. – MiF Mar 15 '17 at 15:17
  • In your code, jQuery does more than just demonstrate your solution. For handlers on <tr> itself, you can leave out closest and need no jQuery at all, so your solution is just like others using data-*. For handlers on components inside of <tr>, you need some DOM manipulations... that's bad as already said, but such handlers weren't asked for. – maaartinus Jul 8 at 16:15
  • You right. Now I think, that the best way is to create a nested component and return it from map function. In this way, you have no work with DOM and create a nested component with bindings will be done once. – MiF Jul 15 at 15:35

I would recommend curry over bind in this case. Like,

return (   
    <th value={column} onClick={this.handleSort.curry(column)}  {column}</th> 
);
  • 5
    Can you expand on why you think curry is better than bind? – jolyonruss Jan 21 '16 at 17:11
  • 14
    This answer is misleading. There is no Function.prototype.curry() in ES5 or ES6. – Dan Abramov Mar 2 '16 at 13:45
  • 2
    Is > missing or syntax is like this ? – geekgugi Jun 9 '16 at 13:22
  • Please remove this answer, it is not relevant and misleading new developers. – geekgugi Jun 9 '16 at 13:23
  • There is no curry function in standard built in javascript. Also no mention of user-defined curry function. – XPD Jun 3 at 12:47

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.