21

I'm searching for an algorithm to multiply two integer numbers that is better than the one below. Do you have a good idea about that? (The MCU - AT Tiny 84/85 or similar - where this code runs has no mul/div operator)

uint16_t umul16_(uint16_t a, uint16_t b)
{
    uint16_t res=0;

    while (b) {
        if ( (b & 1) )
            res+=a;
        b>>=1;
        a+=a;
    }

    return res;
}

This algorithm, when compiled for AT Tiny 85/84 using the avr-gcc compiler, is almost identical to the algorithm __mulhi3 the avr-gcc generates.

avr-gcc algorithm:

00000106 <__mulhi3>:
 106:   00 24           eor r0, r0
 108:   55 27           eor r21, r21
 10a:   04 c0           rjmp    .+8         ; 0x114 <__mulhi3+0xe>
 10c:   08 0e           add r0, r24
 10e:   59 1f           adc r21, r25
 110:   88 0f           add r24, r24
 112:   99 1f           adc r25, r25
 114:   00 97           sbiw    r24, 0x00   ; 0
 116:   29 f0           breq    .+10        ; 0x122 <__mulhi3+0x1c>
 118:   76 95           lsr r23
 11a:   67 95           ror r22
 11c:   b8 f3           brcs    .-18        ; 0x10c <__mulhi3+0x6>
 11e:   71 05           cpc r23, r1
 120:   b9 f7           brne    .-18        ; 0x110 <__mulhi3+0xa>
 122:   80 2d           mov r24, r0
 124:   95 2f           mov r25, r21
 126:   08 95           ret

umul16_ algorithm:

00000044 <umul16_>:
  44:   20 e0           ldi r18, 0x00   ; 0
  46:   30 e0           ldi r19, 0x00   ; 0
  48:   61 15           cp  r22, r1
  4a:   71 05           cpc r23, r1
  4c:   49 f0           breq    .+18        ; 0x60 <umul16_+0x1c>
  4e:   60 ff           sbrs    r22, 0
  50:   02 c0           rjmp    .+4         ; 0x56 <umul16_+0x12>
  52:   28 0f           add r18, r24
  54:   39 1f           adc r19, r25
  56:   76 95           lsr r23
  58:   67 95           ror r22
  5a:   88 0f           add r24, r24
  5c:   99 1f           adc r25, r25
  5e:   f4 cf           rjmp    .-24        ; 0x48 <umul16_+0x4>
  60:   c9 01           movw    r24, r18
  62:   08 95           ret


Edit: The instruction set is available here.

  • 2
    What are the scales for quality? If space is a lesser concern, give ((a+b)^2 - (a-b)^2)/4 a try. What is known about the operands? Would a 32-bit result be more appropriate? – greybeard Apr 23 '15 at 1:36
  • 3
    What do you mean with the symbol "^"? I think you mean "power"! How can I compute a pow(x,2); if I've no multiplication? – Sir Jo Black Apr 23 '15 at 1:40
  • 1
    Idea to try (pretty weak) I suppose replacing a+=a; with a<<=1 doesn't really change anything in the generated code, correct? – Antonio Apr 23 '15 at 1:43
  • 6
    @SergioFormiggini One small improvement would be to first compare a and b, and swap them if a<b: you should use as b the smaller of the two, so that you have the minimum number of cycles. – Antonio Apr 23 '15 at 1:52
  • 1
    You could write uint8_t mul(uint8_t, uint8_t) and uint16_t mul_wide(uint8_t, uint8_t), and then treat uint16_t as a multiprecision integer consisting of two 8-bit words. – user1084944 Apr 23 '15 at 1:52
17

Summary

  1. Consider swapping a and b (Original proposal)
  2. Trying to avoid conditional jumps (Not successful optimization)
  3. Reshaping of the input formula (estimated 35% gain)
  4. Removing duplicated shift
  5. Unrolling the loop: The "optimal" assembly
  6. Convincing the compiler to give the optimal assembly


1. Consider swapping a and b

One improvement would be to first compare a and b, and swap them if a<b: you should use as b the smaller of the two, so that you have the minimum number of cycles. Note that you can avoid swapping by duplicating the code (if (a<b) then jump to a mirrored code section), but I doubt it's worth.


2. Trying to avoid conditional jumps (Not successful optimization)

Try:

uint16_t umul16_(uint16_t a, uint16_t b)
{
    ///Here swap if necessary
    uint16_t accum=0;

    while (b) {
        accum += ((b&1) * uint16_t(0xffff)) & a; //Hopefully this multiplication is optimized away
        b>>=1;
        a+=a;
    }

    return accum;
}

From Sergio's feedback, this didn't bring improvements.


3. Reshaping of the input formula

Considering that the target architecture has basically only 8bit instructions, if you separate the upper and bottom 8 bit of the input variables, you can write:

a = a1 * 0xff + a0;
b = b1 * 0xff + b0;

a * b = a1 * b1 * 0xffff + a0 * b1 * 0xff + a1 * b0 * 0xff + a0 * b0

Now, the cool thing is that we can throw away the term a1 * b1 * 0xffff, because the 0xffff send it out of your register.

(16bit) a * b = a0 * b1 * 0xff + a1 * b0 * 0xff + a0 * b0

Furthermore, the a0*b1 and a1*b0 term can be treated as 8bit multiplications, because of the 0xff: any part exceeding 256 will be sent out of the register.

So far exciting! ... But, here comes reality striking: a0 * b0 has to be treated as a 16 bit multiplication, as you'll have to keep all resulting bits. a0 will have to be kept on 16 bit to allow shift lefts. This multiplication has half of the iterations of a * b, it is in part 8bit (because of b0) but you still have to take into account the 2 8bit multiplications mentioned before, and the final result composition. We need further reshaping!

So now I collect b0.

(16bit) a * b = a0 * b1 * 0xff + b0 * (a0 + a1 * 0xff)

But

(a0 + a1 * 0xff) = a

So we get:

(16bit) a * b = a0 * b1 * 0xff + b0 * a

If N were the cycles of the original a * b, now the first term is an 8bit multiplication with N/2 cycles, and the second a 16bit * 8bit multiplication with N/2 cycles. Considering M the number of instructions per iteration in the original a*b, the 8bit*8bit iteration has half of the instructions, and the 16bit*8bit about 80% of M (one shift instruction less for b0 compared to b). Putting together we have N/2*M/2+N/2*M*0.8 = N*M*0.65 complexity, so an expected saving of ~35% with respect to the original N*M. Sounds promising.

This is the code:

uint16_t umul16_(uint16_t a, uint16_t b)
{
    uint8_t res1 = 0;

    uint8_t a0 = a & 0xff; //This effectively needs to copy the data
    uint8_t b0 = b & 0xff; //This should be optimized away
    uint8_t b1 = b >>8; //This should be optimized away

    //Here a0 and b1 could be swapped (to have b1 < a0)
    while (b1) {///Maximum 8 cycles
        if ( (b1 & 1) )
            res1+=a0;
        b1>>=1;
        a0+=a0;
    }

    uint16_t res = (uint16_t) res1 * 256; //Should be optimized away, it's not even a copy!

    //Here swapping wouldn't make much sense
    while (b0) {///Maximum 8 cycles
        if ( (b0 & 1) )
            res+=a;
        b0>>=1;
        a+=a;
    }

    return res;
}

Also, the splitting in 2 cycles should double, in theory, the chance of skipping some cycles: N/2 might be a slight overestimate.

A tiny further improvement consist in avoiding the last, unnecessary shift for the a variables. Small side note: if either b0 or b1 are zero it causes 2 extra instructions. But it also saves the first check of b0 and b1, which is the most expensive because it cannot check the zero flag status from the shift operation for the conditional jump of the for loop.

uint16_t umul16_(uint16_t a, uint16_t b)
{
    uint8_t res1 = 0;

    uint8_t a0 = a & 0xff; //This effectively needs to copy the data
    uint8_t b0 = b & 0xff; //This should be optimized away
    uint8_t b1 = b >>8; //This should be optimized away

    //Here a0 and b1 could be swapped (to have b1 < a0)
    if ( (b1 & 1) )
        res1+=a0;
    b1>>=1;
    while (b1) {///Maximum 7 cycles
        a0+=a0;
        if ( (b1 & 1) )
            res1+=a0;
        b1>>=1;
    }

    uint16_t res = (uint16_t) res1 * 256; //Should be optimized away, it's not even a copy!

    //Here swapping wouldn't make much sense
    if ( (b0 & 1) )
        res+=a;
    b0>>=1;
    while (b0) {///Maximum 7 cycles
        a+=a;
        if ( (b0 & 1) )
            res+=a;
        b0>>=1;
    }

    return res;
}


4. Removing duplicated shift

Is there still space for improvement? Yes, as the bytes in a0 gets shifted two times. So there should be a benefit in combining the two loops. It might be a little bit tricky to convince the compiler to do exactly what we want, especially with the result register.

So, we process in the same cycle b0 and b1. The first thing to handle is, which is the loop exit condition? So far using b0/b1 cleared status has been convenient because it avoids using a counter. Furthermore, after the shift right, a flag might be already set if the operation result is zero, and this flag might allow a conditional jump without further evaluations.

Now the loop exit condition could be the failure of (b0 || b1). However this could require expensive computation. One solution is to compare b0 and b1 and jump to 2 different code sections: if b1 > b0 I test the condition on b1, else I test the condition on b0. I prefer another solution, with 2 loops, the first exit when b0 is zero, the second when b1 is zero. There will be cases in which I will do zero iterations in b1. The point is that in the second loop I know b0 is zero, so I can reduce the number of operations performed.

Now, let's forget about the exit condition and try to join the 2 loops of the previous section.

uint16_t umul16_(uint16_t a, uint16_t b)
{
    uint16_t res = 0;

    uint8_t b0 = b & 0xff; //This should be optimized away
    uint8_t b1 = b >>8; //This should be optimized away

    //Swapping probably doesn't make much sense anymore
    if ( (b1 & 1) )
        res+=(uint16_t)((uint8_t)(a && 0xff))*256;
    //Hopefully the compiler understands it has simply to add the low 8bit register of a to the high 8bit register of res

    if ( (b0 & 1) )
        res+=a;

    b1>>=1;
    b0>>=1;
    while (b0) {///N cycles, maximum 7
        a+=a;
        if ( (b1 & 1) )
            res+=(uint16_t)((uint8_t)(a & 0xff))*256;
        if ( (b0 & 1) )
            res+=a;
        b1>>=1;
        b0>>=1; //I try to put as last the one that will leave the carry flag in the desired state
    }

    uint8_t a0 = a & 0xff; //Again, not a real copy but a register selection

    while (b1) {///P cycles, maximum 7 - N cycles
        a0+=a0;
        if ( (b1 & 1) )
            res+=(uint16_t) a0 * 256;
        b1>>=1;
    }
    return res;
}

Thanks Sergio for providing the assembly generated (-Ofast). At first glance, considering the outrageous amount of mov in the code, it seems the compiler did not interpret as I wanted the hints I gave to him to interpret the registers.

Inputs are: r22,r23 and r24,25.
AVR Instruction Set: Quick reference, Detailed documentation

sbrs //Tests a single bit in a register and skips the next instruction if the bit is set. Skip takes 2 clocks. 
ldi // Load immediate, 1 clock
sbiw // Subtracts immediate to *word*, 2 clocks

    00000010 <umul16_Antonio5>:
      10:    70 ff           sbrs    r23, 0
      12:    39 c0           rjmp    .+114        ; 0x86 <__SREG__+0x47>
      14:    41 e0           ldi    r20, 0x01    ; 1
      16:    00 97           sbiw    r24, 0x00    ; 0
      18:    c9 f1           breq    .+114        ; 0x8c <__SREG__+0x4d>
      1a:    34 2f           mov    r19, r20
      1c:    20 e0           ldi    r18, 0x00    ; 0
      1e:    60 ff           sbrs    r22, 0
      20:    07 c0           rjmp    .+14         ; 0x30 <umul16_Antonio5+0x20>
      22:    28 0f           add    r18, r24
      24:    39 1f           adc    r19, r25
      26:    04 c0           rjmp    .+8          ; 0x30 <umul16_Antonio5+0x20>
      28:    e4 2f           mov    r30, r20
      2a:    45 2f           mov    r20, r21
      2c:    2e 2f           mov    r18, r30
      2e:    34 2f           mov    r19, r20
      30:    76 95           lsr    r23
      32:    66 95           lsr    r22
      34:    b9 f0           breq    .+46         ; 0x64 <__SREG__+0x25>
      36:    88 0f           add    r24, r24
      38:    99 1f           adc    r25, r25
      3a:    58 2f           mov    r21, r24
      3c:    44 27           eor    r20, r20
      3e:    42 0f           add    r20, r18
      40:    53 1f           adc    r21, r19
      42:    70 ff           sbrs    r23, 0
      44:    02 c0           rjmp    .+4          ; 0x4a <__SREG__+0xb>
      46:    24 2f           mov    r18, r20
      48:    35 2f           mov    r19, r21
      4a:    42 2f           mov    r20, r18
      4c:    53 2f           mov    r21, r19
      4e:    48 0f           add    r20, r24
      50:    59 1f           adc    r21, r25
      52:    60 fd           sbrc    r22, 0
      54:    e9 cf           rjmp    .-46         ; 0x28 <umul16_Antonio5+0x18>
      56:    e2 2f           mov    r30, r18
      58:    43 2f           mov    r20, r19
      5a:    e8 cf           rjmp    .-48         ; 0x2c <umul16_Antonio5+0x1c>
      5c:    95 2f           mov    r25, r21
      5e:    24 2f           mov    r18, r20
      60:    39 2f           mov    r19, r25
      62:    76 95           lsr    r23
      64:    77 23           and    r23, r23
      66:    61 f0           breq    .+24         ; 0x80 <__SREG__+0x41>
      68:    88 0f           add    r24, r24
      6a:    48 2f           mov    r20, r24
      6c:    50 e0           ldi    r21, 0x00    ; 0
      6e:    54 2f           mov    r21, r20
      70:    44 27           eor    r20, r20
      72:    42 0f           add    r20, r18
      74:    53 1f           adc    r21, r19
      76:    70 fd           sbrc    r23, 0
      78:    f1 cf           rjmp    .-30         ; 0x5c <__SREG__+0x1d>
      7a:    42 2f           mov    r20, r18
      7c:    93 2f           mov    r25, r19
      7e:    ef cf           rjmp    .-34         ; 0x5e <__SREG__+0x1f>
      80:    82 2f           mov    r24, r18
      82:    93 2f           mov    r25, r19
      84:    08 95           ret
      86:    20 e0           ldi    r18, 0x00    ; 0
      88:    30 e0           ldi    r19, 0x00    ; 0
      8a:    c9 cf           rjmp    .-110        ; 0x1e <umul16_Antonio5+0xe>
      8c:    40 e0           ldi    r20, 0x00    ; 0
      8e:    c5 cf           rjmp    .-118        ; 0x1a <umul16_Antonio5+0xa>


5. Unrolling the loop: The "optimal" assembly

With all this information, let's try to understand what would be the "optimal" solution given the architecture constraints. "Optimal" is quoted because what is "optimal" depends a lot on the input data and what we want to optimize. Let's assume we want to optimize on number of cycles on the worst case. If we go for the worst case, loop unrolling is a reasonable choice: we know we have 8 cycles, and we remove all tests to understand if we finished (if b0 and b1 are zero). So far we used the trick "we shift, and we check the zero flag" to check if we had to exit a loop. Removed this requirement, we can use a different trick: we shift, and we check the carry bit (the bit we sent out of the register when shifting) to understand if I should update the result. Given the instruction set, in assembly "narrative" code the instructions become the following.

//Input: a = a1 * 256 + a0, b = b1 * 256 + b0
//Output: r = r1 * 256 + r0

Preliminary:
P0 r0 = 0 (CLR)
P1 r1 = 0 (CLR)

Main block:
0 Shift right b0 (LSR)
1 If carry is not set skip 2 instructions = jump to 4 (BRCC)
2 r0 = r0 + a0 (ADD)
3 r1 = r1 + a1 + carry from prev. (ADC)
4 Shift right b1 (LSR)
5 If carry is not set skip 1 instruction = jump to 7 (BRCC)
6 r1 = r1 + a0 (ADD)
7 a0 = a0 + a0 (ADD)  
8 a1 = a1 + a1 + carry from prev. (ADC)

[Repeat same instructions for another 7 times]

Branching takes 1 instruction if no jump is caused, 2 otherwise. All other instructions are 1 cycle. So b1 state has no influence on the number of cycles, while we have 9 cycles if b0 = 1, and 8 cycles if b0 = 0. Counting the initialization, 8 iterations and skipping the last update of a0 and a1, in the worse case (b0 = 11111111b), we have a total of 8 * 9 + 2 - 2 = 72 cycles. I wouldn't know which C++ implementation would convince the compiler to generate it. Maybe:

 void iterate(uint8_t& b0,uint8_t& b1,uint16_t& a, uint16_t& r) {
     const uint8_t temp0 = b0;
     b0 >>=1;
     if (temp0 & 0x01) {//Will this convince him to use the carry flag?
         r += a;
     }
     const uint8_t temp1 = b1;
     b1 >>=1;
     if (temp1 & 0x01) {
         r+=(uint16_t)((uint8_t)(a & 0xff))*256;
     }
     a += a;
 }

 uint16_t umul16_(uint16_t a, uint16_t b) {
     uint16_t r = 0;
     uint8_t b0 = b & 0xff;
     uint8_t b1 = b >>8;

     iterate(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterate(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterate(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterate(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterate(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterate(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterate(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterate(b0,b1,a,r); //Hopefully he understands he doesn't need the last update for variable a
     return r;
 }

But, given the previous result, to really obtain the desired code one should really switch to assembly!


Finally one could also consider a more extreme interpretation of the loop unrolling: the sbrc/sbrs instructions allows to test on a specific bit of a register. We can therefore avoid shifting b0 and b1, and at each cycle check a different bit. The only problem is that those instructions only allow to skip the next instruction, and not for a custom jump. So, in "narrative code" it will look like this:

Main block:
0 Test Nth bit of b0 (SBRS). If set jump to 2 (+ 1cycle) otherwise continue with 1
1 Jump to 4 (RJMP)
2 r0 = r0 + a0 (ADD)
3 r1 = r1 + a1 + carry from prev. (ADC)
4 Test Nth bit of (SBRC). If cleared jump to 6 (+ 1cycle) otherwise continue with 5
5 r1 = r1 + a0 (ADD)
6 a0 = a0 + a0 (ADD)  
7 a1 = a1 + a1 + carry from prev. (ADC)

While the second substitution allows to save 1 cycle, there's no clear advantage in the second substitution. However, I believe the C++ code might be easier to interpret for the compiler. Considering 8 cycles, initialization and skipping last update of a0 and a1, we have now 64 cycles.

C++ code:

 template<uint8_t mask>
 void iterateWithMask(const uint8_t& b0,const uint8_t& b1, uint16_t& a, uint16_t& r) {
     if (b0 & mask)
         r += a;
     if (b1 & mask)
         r+=(uint16_t)((uint8_t)(a & 0xff))*256;
     a += a;
 }

 uint16_t umul16_(uint16_t a, const uint16_t b) {
     uint16_t r = 0;
     const uint8_t b0 = b & 0xff;
     const uint8_t b1 = b >>8;

     iterateWithMask<0x01>(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterateWithMask<0x02>(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterateWithMask<0x04>(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterateWithMask<0x08>(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterateWithMask<0x10>(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterateWithMask<0x20>(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterateWithMask<0x40>(b0,b1,a,r);
     iterateWithMask<0x80>(b0,b1,a,r);

     //Hopefully he understands he doesn't need the last update for a
     return r;
 }

Note that in this implementation the 0x01, 0x02 are not a real value, but just a hint to the compiler to know which bit to test. Therefore, the mask cannot be obtained by shifting right: differently from all other functions seen so far, this has really no equivalent loop version.

One big problem is that

r+=(uint16_t)((uint8_t)(a & 0xff))*256;

It should be just a sum of the upper register of r with the lower register of a. Does not get interpreted as I would like. Other option:

r+=(uint16_t) 256 *((uint8_t)(a & 0xff));


6. Convincing the compiler to give the optimal assembly

We can also keep a constant, and shift instead the result r. In this case we process b starting from the most significant bit. The complexity is equivalent, but it might be easier for the compiler to digest. Also, this time we have to be careful to write explicitly the last loop, which must not do a further shift right for r.

 template<uint8_t mask>
 void inverseIterateWithMask(const uint8_t& b0,const uint8_t& b1,const uint16_t& a, const uint8_t& a0, uint16_t& r) {
     if (b0 & mask)
         r += a;
     if (b1 & mask)
         r+=(uint16_t)256*a0; //Hopefully easier to understand for the compiler?
     r += r;
 }

 uint16_t umul16_(const uint16_t a, const uint16_t b) {
     uint16_t r = 0;
     const uint8_t b0 = b & 0xff;
     const uint8_t b1 = b >>8;
     const uint8_t a0 = a & 0xff;

     inverseIterateWithMask<0x80>(b0,b1,a,r);
     inverseIterateWithMask<0x40>(b0,b1,a,r);
     inverseIterateWithMask<0x20>(b0,b1,a,r);
     inverseIterateWithMask<0x10>(b0,b1,a,r);
     inverseIterateWithMask<0x08>(b0,b1,a,r);
     inverseIterateWithMask<0x04>(b0,b1,a,r);
     inverseIterateWithMask<0x02>(b0,b1,a,r);

     //Last iteration:
     if (b0 & 0x01)
         r += a;
     if (b1 & 0x01)
         r+=(uint16_t)256*a0;

     return r;
 }
  • Can you write your answer without writing 'edit summary' and 'edit N' please? It's very jarring to read, far better to write it with a narrative that works for someone reading this from scratch and let others following the answer track through edit history/comments as needed. (Think of it like drafting a chapter in a text book perhaps). – Flexo Apr 26 '15 at 19:45
  • @Flexo I have added a final section and reorganized a little the previous edits. Let me know if you see space for further improvements. – Antonio Apr 26 '15 at 23:20
  • @Antonio the code is compiled with -Os not -Ofast. I tried to edit, but the modifcation is too small!! :) – Sir Jo Black Apr 27 '15 at 14:24
  • @Antonio, I have idea that your reply might be more replies, in this way all those read may see different algorithms and relevant comment in a specific reply! – Sir Jo Black Apr 27 '15 at 14:28
  • @SergioFormiggini I think what you find here is -Ofast. Look at this version of my answert: I had copy pasted from your proposal. Then I removed the -Os version. So I believe what is here is effectively the -Ofast. I thought about splitting my reply, but I prefer to keep it as one with the index, otherwise it will look like I want to just harvest (=collect) reputation, while what I am seeking is the perfect and complete answer :). – Antonio Apr 27 '15 at 14:31
4

The compiler might be able to produce shorter code by using the ternary operator to choose whether to add 'a' to your accumulator, depends upon cost of test and branch, and how your compiler generates code.

Swap the arguments to reduce the loop count.

uint16_t umul16_(uint16_t op1, uint16_t op2)
{
    uint16_t accum=0;
    uint16_t a, b;
    a=op1; b=op2;
    if( op1<op2 ) { a=op2; b=0p1; } //swap operands to loop on smaller
    while (b) {
        accum += (b&1)?a:0;
        b>>=1;
        a+=a;
    }

    return accum;
}

Many years ago, I wrote "forth", which promoted a compute rather than branch approach, and that suggests picking which value to use,

You can use an array to avoid the test completely, which your compiler can likely use to generate as a load from offset. Define an array containing two values, 0 and a, and update the value for a at the end of the loop,

uint16_t umul16_(uint16_t op1, uint16_t op2)
{
    uint16_t accum=0;
    uint16_t pick[2];
    uint16_t a, b;
    a=op1; b=op2;
    if( op1<op2 ) { a=op2; b=0p1; } //swap operands to loop on smaller
    pick[0]=0;
    pick[1]=a;

    while (b) {
        accum += pick[(b&1)]; //avoid test completely
        b>>=1;
        pick[1] += pick[1]; //(a+=a);
    }

    return accum;
}

Yeah, evil. But I don't normally write code like that.

Edit - revised to add swap to loop on smaller of op1 or op2 (fewer passes). That would eliminate the usefulness of testing for an argument =0.

  • Intersting! ;) I have to test ... ;) – Sir Jo Black Apr 23 '15 at 2:42
  • 1
    I've compiled it ... That with the ternary operator is a little bit complex, that with the vector is affected by big prologue and epilogue! But the code is very cool!!! :) – Sir Jo Black Apr 23 '15 at 2:52
  • 1
    And the pick[1] += pick[1]; might be faster written pick[1]<<=1; – ChuckCottrill Apr 23 '15 at 3:10
  • 1
    Your vectorized solution (excluding LUT, that I think is not good for the AVR MCUs architecture, but I will test) is the faster, added with the @Antonio suggestion is a little bit fast! I've tried the functions with an Intel I3 and 10,000,000 loop of multiplications of randoms couple of 16 bit integer. – Sir Jo Black Apr 23 '15 at 3:56
  • 2
    @SergioFormiggini You should benchmark on the actual system. The system where you are testing is using a completely different instruction set. – Antonio Apr 23 '15 at 8:18
3

Well, mix of LUT and shift usually works

Something along the line, multiplying 8 bit entities. Lets consider them made up of two quads

uint4_t u1, l1, u2, l2;
uint8_t a = 16*u1 + l1;
uint8_t b = 16*u2 + l2;

product = 256*u1*u2 + 16*u1*l2 + 16*u2*l1 + l1*l1;

inline uint4_t hi( uint8_t v ) { return v >> 4; }
inline uint4_t lo( uint8_t v ) { return v & 15; }

inline uint8_t LUT( uint4_t x, uint4_t y ) {
    static uint8_t lut[256] = ...;
    return lut[x | y << 4]
}

uint16_t multiply(uint8_t a, uint8_t b) {
    return (uint16_t)LUT(hi(a), hi(b)) << 8 +
           ((uint16_t)LUT(hi(a), lo(b)) + (uint16_t)LUT(lo(a), hi(b)) << 4 +
           (uint16_t)LUT(lo(a), lo(b));
}

just fill lut[] with results of multiplication. In your case depending on memory you could go with quads (256 sized LUT) or with bytes (65536 size LUT) or anything in between

  • The AVRs have a few of RAM (Tiny 85 only 512byte), but have 8KByte of flash and 512 byte of EEPROM! ... There are also AVRs with more memory! – Sir Jo Black Apr 23 '15 at 3:32
  • @SergioFormiggini Well, 256bytes from flash probably might be used, multiplication 16bits by quads, longer expression, same idea – Severin Pappadeux Apr 23 '15 at 3:35
  • I've to try! The problem is the flash access that is not simple and not fast, because the Harvard architecture the AVRs use. – Sir Jo Black Apr 23 '15 at 3:43
  • Have a look at 16×16→16 using partial product look-up (4×4) and/or improve on it (wiki post). – greybeard May 6 '15 at 2:30
2

One approach is to unroll the loop. I don't have a compiler for the platform you're using so I can't look at the generated code, but an approach like this could help.

The performance of this code is less data-dependent -- you go faster in the worst case by not checking to see if you're in the best case. Code size is a bit bigger but not the size of a lookup table.

(Note code untested, off the top of my head. I'm curious about what the generated code looks like!)

#define UMUL16_STEP(a, b, shift) \
    if ((b) & (1U << (shift))) result += ((a) << (shift)));

uint16_t umul16(uint16_t a, uint16_t b)
{
    uint16_t result = 0;

    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 0);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 1);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 2);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 3);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 4);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 5);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 6);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 7);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 8);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 9);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 10);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 11);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 12);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 13);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 14);
    UMUL16_STEP(a, b, 15);

    return result;
}

Update:

Depending on what your compiler does, the UMUL16_STEP macro can change. An alternative might be:

#define UMUL16_STEP(a, b, shift) \
    if ((b) & (1U << (shift))) result += (a); (a) << 1;

With this approach the compiler might be able to use the sbrc instruction to avoid branches.

My guess for how the assembler should look per bit, r0:r1 is the result, r2:r3 is a and r4:r5 is b:

sbrc r4, 0
add r0, r2
sbrc r4, 0
addc r1, r3
lsl r2
rol r3

This should execute in constant time without a branch. Test the bits in r4 and then test the bits in r5 for the higher eight bits. This should execute the multiplication in 96 cycles based on my reading of the instruction set manual.

  • I will test. But I think this: if ((b) & (1U << (shift))) result += ((a) << (1U << (shift))); would be: if ((b) & (1U << (shift))) result += (a<<shift). This code contains a lot of jmp, but with some modifications might grant a fixed timing. – Sir Jo Black Apr 24 '15 at 8:45
  • Yes, I fixed that bug! Also updated with an alternative where the compiler might be able to use a bit test and skip instruction to avoid explicit branches. – janm Apr 24 '15 at 8:50
  • I've a solution that doesn't make jumps and would ensure a fixed timing that should be much intersting. May I edit your post adding my solutions and target (AVR) assembler? I've to verify but I think that it enough: #define UMUL16_STEP(a, b, shift) result+= ((0 - !(!((b&(1U<<(shift)))))) & (a<<(shift))); – Sir Jo Black Apr 24 '15 at 8:57
  • See what the compiler does -- I suspect you're going too far with avoid a C if statement assuming that will turn into a branch. That depends very much on how good your compiler is. Looking at the instruction set the thing to avoid is probably a << shift and instead shift a by one at each step. See my assembler for how I think it should end up looking. I would how the compiler could emit that assembler for the second version of the UMULT16_STEP macro I added in my edit. – janm Apr 24 '15 at 9:18
  • 1
    3 μsec @ 1/16 μsec cycle time gives you 48 cycles. For that I can see how you can get 8x16 -> 16 bits. I think the best you can do is 96 cycles for 16 x 16 -> 16 (removing the last lsl r2; rol r3 because they're not used, but you need two xors to initialise the result.) Multiplying by a constant would change things because you could remove the tests. – janm Apr 24 '15 at 10:25
1

A non-answer, tinyARM assembler (web doc) instead of C++ or C. I modified a pretty generic multiply-by-squares-lookup for speed (< 50 cycles excluding call&return overhead) at the cost of only fitting into AVRs with no less than 1KByte of RAM, using 512 aligned bytes for a table of the lower half of squares. At 20 MHz, that would nicely meet the 2 max 3 usec time limit still not showing up in the question proper - but Sergio Formiggini wanted 16 MHz. As of 2015/04, there is just one ATtiny from Atmel with that much RAM, and that is specified up to 8 MHz … (Rolling your "own" (e.g., from OpenCores) your FPGA probably has a bunch of fast multipliers (18×18 bits seems popular), if not processor cores.)
For a stab at fast shift-and-add, have a look at shift and add, factor shifting left, unrolled 16×16→16 and/or improve on it (wiki post). (You might well create that community wiki answer begged for in the question.)

.def    a0  = r16   ; factor low byte
.def    a1  = r17
#warning two warnings about preceding definitions of
#warning  r16 and r17 are due and may as well be ignored
.def    a   = r16   ; 8-bit factor
.def    b   = r17   ; 8-bit factor ; or r18, rather?
.def    b0  = r18   ; factor low byte
.def    b1  = r19
.def    p0  = r20   ; product low byte
.def    p1  = r21

; "squares table" SqTab shall be two 512 Byte tables of
;  squares of 9-bit natural numbers, divided by 4

; Idea: exploit p = a * b = Squares[a+b] - Squares[a-b]

init:
    ldi     r16, 0x73
    ldi     r17, 0xab
    ldi     r18, 23
    ldi     r19, 1
    ldi     r20, HIGH(SRAM_SIZE)
    cpi     r20, 2
    brsh    fillSqTable ; ATtiny 1634?
    rjmp    mpy16T16
fillSqTable:
    ldi     r20, SqTabH
    subi    r20, -2
    ldi     zh, SqTabH
    clr     zl
; generate sqares by adding up odd numbers starting at 1 += -1
    ldi     r22, 1
    clr     r23
    ser     r26
    ser     r27
fillLoop:
    add     r22, r26
    adc     r23, r27
    adiw    r26, 2
    mov     r21, r23
    lsr     r21         ; get bits 9:2
    mov     r21, r22
    ror     r21
    lsr     r21
    bst     r23, 1
    bld     r21, 7
    st      z+, r21
    cp      zh, r20
    brne    fillLoop
    rjmp    mpy16F16

; assembly lines are marked up with cycle count
;  and (latest) start cycle in block.
; If first line in code block, the (latest) block start cycle
;  follows; else if last line, the (max) block cycle total

;**************************************************************
;*
;* "mpy16F16" - 16x16->16 Bit Unsigned Multiplication
;*                        using table lookup
;* Sergio Formiggini special edition
;* Multiplies  two 16-bit register values a1:a0 and b1:b0.
;* The result is placed in p1:p0.
;*
;* Number of flash words: 318 + return = 
;*                       (40 + 256(flash table) + 22(RAM init))
;* Number of cycles     : 49 + return
;* Low  registers used  : None
;* High registers used  : 7+2 (a1:a0, b1:b0, p1:p0, sq;
;*                             + Z(r31:r30))
;* RAM bytes used       : 512 (squares table)
;*
;**************************************************************
mpy16F16:
    ldi     ZH, SqTabH>>1;1 0   0   squares table>>1
    mov     ZL, a0      ; 1 1
    add     ZL, b0      ; 1 2       a0+b0
    rol     ZH          ; 1 3       9 bit offset
    ld      p0, Z       ; 2 4       a0+b0l          1
    lpm     p1, Z       ; 3 6   9   a0+b0h          2

    ldi     ZH, SqTabH  ; 1 0   9   squares table

    mov     ZL, a1      ; 1 0   10
    sub     ZL, b0      ; 1 1       a1-b0
    brcc    noNegF10    ; 1 2
    neg     ZL          ; 1 3
noNegF10:
    ld      sq, Z       ; 2 4       a1-b0l          3
    sub     p1, sq      ; 1 6   7

    mov     ZL, a0      ; 1 0   17
    sub     ZL, b1      ; 1 1       a0-b1
    brcc    noNegF01    ; 1 2
    neg     ZL          ; 1 3
noNegF01:
    ld      sq, Z       ; 2 4       a0-b1l          4
    sub     p1, sq      ; 1 6   7

    mov     ZL, a0      ; 1 0   24
    sub     ZL, b0      ; 1 1       a0-b0
    brcc    noNegF00    ; 1 2
    neg     ZL          ; 1 3
noNegF00:
    ld      sq, Z       ; 2 4       a0-b0l          5
    sub     p0, sq      ; 1 6
    lpm     sq, Z       ; 3 7       a0-b0h          6*
    sbc     p1, sq      ; 1 10  11

    ldi     ZH, SqTabH>>1;1 0   35
    mov     ZL, a1      ; 1 1
    add     ZL, b0      ; 1 2       a1+b0
    rol     ZH          ; 1 3
    ld      sq, Z       ; 2 4       a1+b0l          7
    add     p1, sq      ; 1 6   7

    ldi     ZH, SqTabH>>1;1 0   42
    mov     ZL, a0      ; 1 1
    add     ZL, b1      ; 1 2       a0+b1
    rol     ZH          ; 1 3
    ld      sq, Z       ; 2 4       a0+b1l          8
    add     p1, sq      ; 1 6   7

    ret                 ;       49

.CSEG
.org 256; words?!
SqTableH:
.db   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0
.db   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0
.db   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0
.db   0,   0,   1,   1,   1,   1,   1,   1,   1,   1
.db   1,   1,   1,   1,   1,   1,   2,   2,   2,   2
.db   2,   2,   2,   2,   2,   2,   3,   3,   3,   3
.db   3,   3,   3,   3,   4,   4,   4,   4,   4,   4
.db   4,   4,   5,   5,   5,   5,   5,   5,   5,   6
.db   6,   6,   6,   6,   6,   7,   7,   7,   7,   7
.db   7,   8,   8,   8,   8,   8,   9,   9,   9,   9
.db   9,   9,  10,  10,  10,  10,  10,  11,  11,  11
.db  11,  12,  12,  12,  12,  12,  13,  13,  13,  13
.db  14,  14,  14,  14,  15,  15,  15,  15,  16,  16
.db  16,  16,  17,  17,  17,  17,  18,  18,  18,  18
.db  19,  19,  19,  19,  20,  20,  20,  21,  21,  21
.db  21,  22,  22,  22,  23,  23,  23,  24,  24,  24
.db  25,  25,  25,  25,  26,  26,  26,  27,  27,  27
.db  28,  28,  28,  29,  29,  29,  30,  30,  30,  31
.db  31,  31,  32,  32,  33,  33,  33,  34,  34,  34
.db  35,  35,  36,  36,  36,  37,  37,  37,  38,  38
.db  39,  39,  39,  40,  40,  41,  41,  41,  42,  42
.db  43,  43,  43,  44,  44,  45,  45,  45,  46,  46
.db  47,  47,  48,  48,  49,  49,  49,  50,  50,  51
.db  51,  52,  52,  53,  53,  53,  54,  54,  55,  55
.db  56,  56,  57,  57,  58,  58,  59,  59,  60,  60
.db  61,  61,  62,  62,  63,  63,  64,  64,  65,  65
.db  66,  66,  67,  67,  68,  68,  69,  69,  70,  70
.db  71,  71,  72,  72,  73,  73,  74,  74,  75,  76
.db  76,  77,  77,  78,  78,  79,  79,  80,  81,  81
.db  82,  82,  83,  83,  84,  84,  85,  86,  86,  87
.db  87,  88,  89,  89,  90,  90,  91,  92,  92,  93
.db  93,  94,  95,  95,  96,  96,  97,  98,  98,  99
.db 100, 100, 101, 101, 102, 103, 103, 104, 105, 105
.db 106, 106, 107, 108, 108, 109, 110, 110, 111, 112
.db 112, 113, 114, 114, 115, 116, 116, 117, 118, 118
.db 119, 120, 121, 121, 122, 123, 123, 124, 125, 125
.db 126, 127, 127, 128, 129, 130, 130, 131, 132, 132
.db 133, 134, 135, 135, 136, 137, 138, 138, 139, 140
.db 141, 141, 142, 143, 144, 144, 145, 146, 147, 147
.db 148, 149, 150, 150, 151, 152, 153, 153, 154, 155
.db 156, 157, 157, 158, 159, 160, 160, 161, 162, 163
.db 164, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 169, 170, 171
.db 172, 173, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 178, 179
.db 180, 181, 182, 183, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188
.db 189, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 196
.db 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 203, 204, 205
.db 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 212, 213, 214
.db 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224
.db 225, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233
.db 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243
.db 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253
.db 254, 255
; word addresses, again?!
.equ SqTabH = (high(SqTableH) << 1)

.DSEG
RAMTab .BYTE 512
0

At long last, an answer, if a cheeky one: I couldn't (yet) get the AVR-C-compiler from the GCC fit it into 8K code. (For an assembler rendition, see AVR multiplication: No Holds Barred).
The approach is what everyone who used Duff's device tried for a second attempt:
use a switch. Using macros, the source code looks entirely harmless, if massaged:

#define low(mp)     case mp: p = a0 * (uint8_t)(mp) << 8; break
#define low4(mp)    low(mp); low(mp + 1); low(mp + 2); low(mp + 3)
#define low16(mp)   low4(mp); low4(mp + 4); low4(mp + 8); low4(mp + 12)
#define low64(mp)   low16(mp); low16(mp + 16); low16(mp + 32); low16(mp + 48)
#if preShift
# define CASE(mp)   case mp: return p + a * (mp)
#else
# define CASE(mp)   case mp: return (p0<<8) + a * (mp)
#endif
#define case4(mp)   CASE(mp); CASE(mp + 1); CASE(mp + 2); CASE(mp + 3)
#define case16(mp)  case4(mp); case4(mp + 4); case4(mp + 8); case4(mp + 12)
#define case64(mp)  case16(mp); case16(mp + 16); case16(mp + 32); case16(mp + 48)

extern "C" __attribute__ ((noinline))
 uint16_t mpy16NHB16(uint16_t a, uint16_t b)
{
    uint16_t p = 0;
    uint8_t b0 = (uint8_t)b, b1 = (uint8_t)(b>>8);
    uint8_t a0 = (uint8_t)a, p0;

    switch (b1) {
        case64(0);
        case64(64);
        case64(128);
        case64(192);
    }
#if preShift
    p = p0 << 8;
#endif
#if preliminaries
    if (0 == b0) {
        p = -a;
        if (b & 0x8000)
            p += a << 9;
        if (b & 0x4000)
            p += a << 8;
        return p;
    }
    while (b0 & 1) {
        a <<= 1;
        b0 >>= 1;
    }
#endif
    switch (b0) {
        low64(0);
        low64(64);
        low64(128);
        low64(192);
    }
    return ~0;
}
int main(int ac, char const *const av[])
{
    char buf[22];
    for (uint16_t a = 0 ; a < a+1 ; a++)
      for (uint16_t m = 0 ; m <= a ; m++)
        puts(itoa(//shift4(ac)+shift3MaskAdd((uint16_t)av[0], ac)
    //      +shift4Add(ac, (uint16_t)av[0])
    //           + mpy16NHB16(ac, (ac + 105))
                 mpy16NHB16(a, m), buf, 10));
}

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