113

myclass is a C++ class written by me and when I write:

myclass x;
cout << x;

How do I output 10 or 20.2, like an integer or a float value?

5 Answers 5

131

Typically by overloading operator<< for your class:

struct myclass { 
    int i;
};

std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &os, myclass const &m) { 
    return os << m.i;
}

int main() { 
    myclass x(10);

    std::cout << x;
    return 0;
}
7
  • 16
    Note that if myclass has any private fields, and you want operator<<() to output them, myclass should declare std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, myclass const&) as a friend. Commented Jan 28, 2017 at 18:28
  • 3
    Shouldn't this be const myclass &m instead of myclass const &m?
    – Nubcake
    Commented Aug 15, 2017 at 21:06
  • 4
    @Nubcake: No. As far as the compiler cares, the two mean the same thing, but I'd still consider the prefix form wrong. To read a C++ declaration, you start from what's being declared, and work your way outward, with const after the type, it says: m is a reference to a const myclass. With it before the type, it says "m is a reference to a myclass const`, which is right on the ragged edge between meaningless and truly ungrammatical. Commented May 18, 2018 at 14:49
  • 4
    For anyone as confused as me, put the operator overloading outside of your class definition (just like in the example).
    – umnikos
    Commented Nov 7, 2019 at 10:08
  • 2
    @Lorenzo: No, it can't be a member function. See stackoverflow.com/a/9814453/179910 for more details. Commented Nov 5, 2020 at 16:29
30

You need to overload the << operator,

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const myclass& obj)
{
      os << obj.somevalue;
      return os;
}

Then when you do cout << x (where x is of type myclass in your case), it would output whatever you've told it to in the method. In the case of the example above it would be the x.somevalue member.

If the type of the member can't be added directly to an ostream, then you would need to overload the << operator for that type also, using the same method as above.

1
  • 1
    Sorry, yes you're right. That's just what I've called it in my head since I tend to use it only when dealing with streams. In this case it would be the insertion operator as you say, rather than just stream operator. I've updated my answer to remove that bit.
    – Rich Adams
    Commented Jun 5, 2010 at 20:11
17

it's very easy, just implement :

std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream & os, const myclass & foo)
{
   os << foo.var;
   return os;
}

You need to return a reference to os in order to chain the outpout (cout << foo << 42 << endl)

0
14

Even though other answer provide correct code, it is also recommended to use a hidden friend function to implement the operator<<. Hidden friend functions has a more limited scope, therefore results in a faster compilation. Since there is less overloads cluttering the namespace scope, the compiler has less lookup to do.

struct myclass { 
    int i;

    friend auto operator<<(std::ostream& os, myclass const& m) -> std::ostream& { 
        return os << m.i;
    }
};

int main() { 
    auto const x = myclass{10};
    std::cout << x;

    return 0;
}
7
  • 1
    What do you mean by "hidden"? I can see the function, so it's not hiding very well. Commented Mar 16, 2021 at 20:40
  • @NathanOliver I've borrowed the name from p1601. Should this be called in a different way? Commented Mar 16, 2021 at 20:43
  • No, it's fine. I just never heard the term before. After reading Walter's paper, it makes more sense. Commented Mar 16, 2021 at 20:48
  • should the definition be together with the declaration in this case? Commented Feb 10, 2022 at 13:51
  • @MichelePiccolini I don't get what you mean. If you define the free function outside of the class, it also declares it there, so everyone that can see the definition outside of the class would have to process overload resolution on it, even if the class is unrelated, leading to longer compile time if it's in a header. You could put the definition in a cpp if you want, as long as there is a definition somewhere. I prefer putting them in the class, it's simpler and compiles fast. Commented Feb 10, 2022 at 15:10
-5

Alternative:

struct myclass { 
    int i;
    inline operator int() const 
    {
        return i; 
    }
};

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