10

I checked the size of a pointer in my python terminal (in Enthought Canopy IDE) via

import ctypes
print (ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_voidp) * 8)

I've a 64bit architecture and working with numpy.float64 is just fine. But I cannot use np.float128?

np.array([1,1,1],dtype=np.float128)

or

np.float128(1)

results in:

AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'float128'

I'm running the following version:

sys.version_info(major=2, minor=7, micro=6, releaselevel='final', serial=0)
  • 1
    @Matthias: Unless you've got a very unusual platform (e.g., IBM mainframe), NumPy almost certainly doesn't give you access to true 128-bit floats. On some platforms, NumPy supports the x87 80-bit floating-point format defined in the 1985 version of the IEEE 754 standard, and on some of those platforms, that format is reported as float128 (while on others it's reported as float96). But all that's going on there is that you have an 80-bit format with 48 bits (or 16 bits) of padding. – Mark Dickinson Apr 23 '15 at 11:30
  • @PadraicCunningham np.longdouble results in np.float64 – Matthias Apr 23 '15 at 11:32
  • @PadraicCunningham the exact size does not really matter as long as I have a higher precision than a float64 (for comparing quadrature rules) – Matthias Apr 23 '15 at 11:34
  • @Matthias: Then you're probably out of luck. Are you on Windows? IIRC, the Windows platform defines long double to be the same type as double, so np.longdouble doesn't give you any extra precision. – Mark Dickinson Apr 23 '15 at 11:35
0

Update: From the comments, it seems pointless to even have a 128 bit float on a 64 bit system.

I am using anaconda on a 64-bit Ubuntu 14.04 system with sys.version_info(major=2, minor=7, micro=9, releaselevel='final', serial=0)

and 128 bit floats work fine:

import numpy
a = numpy.float128(3)

This might be an distribution problem. Try:

EDIT: Update from the comments:

Not my downvote, but this post doesn't really answer the "why doesn't np.float128 exist on my machine" implied question. The true answer is that this is platform specific: float128 exists on some platforms but not others, and on those platforms where it does exist it's almost certainly simply the 80-bit x87 extended precision type, padded to 128 bits. – Mark Dickinson

  • 2
    That's almost certainly not a 128-bit float, at least not in the sense of the IEEE 754 binary128 format. It's an 80-bit float with 48 bits of padding. – Mark Dickinson Apr 23 '15 at 11:28
  • 3
    Try doing numpy.float128(1) + numpy.float128(2**-64) - numpy.float128(1). I suspect you'll get an answer of 0.0, indicating that the float128 type contains no more than 64 bits of precision. – Mark Dickinson Apr 23 '15 at 11:46
  • 1
    @CharlieParker: Yes, absolutely expected. In normal double precision, 1.0 + 2**-64 is not exactly representable (not enough significand bits), so the result of the addition is the closest double-precision float which is exactly representable, which is 1.0 again. And now of course subtracting 1.0 gives 0.0. And for regular double precision, the same is true with 1.0 + 2**-53 - 1.0 (the binary precision is 53). For extended x87-style precision, with the usual round-ties-to-even, 1.0 + 2**-64 - 1.0 will give zero, while 1.0 + 2**-63 - 1.0 will be nonzero. – Mark Dickinson Nov 1 '17 at 17:43
  • 2
    @CharlieParker: Not my downvote, but this post doesn't really answer the "why doesn't np.float128 exist on my machine" implied question. The true answer is that this is platform specific: float128 exists on some platforms but not others, and on those platforms where it does exist it's almost certainly simply the 80-bit x87 extended precision type, padded to 128 bits. – Mark Dickinson Nov 1 '17 at 17:47
  • 3
    @CharlieParker: Because floating-point means floating (binary) point! The ability to move the point allows representations of values at a wide range of scales, but doesn't magically give extra precision. See any of the many floating-point guides out there for more information. These comments aren't really the right place for this discussion ... – Mark Dickinson Nov 1 '17 at 17:55

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