1

Let's say i have a method for getting the first 3 characters form a string like this:

public static String makeThree(String a){
  return a.toLowerCase().substring(0, 3);
}

Is there any built-in/smart way to handle StringIndexOutOfBoundsException errors, I.E when a String with only 2 characters are given to the method? In which case i want it to just return it as is.

I could build it into an if statement like this:

public static String makeThree(String a){
  if (a.length < 3) {
    return a
  } else {
    return a.toLowerCase().substring(0, 3);
  }
}

but i'm just wondering if there is a better way to go about it.

  • 5
    This is why there are libraries like commons-lang and its StringUtils. – Pavel Horal Apr 23 '15 at 13:26
  • @PavelHoral I'm currently learning java, so I haven't had the chance to explore that library yet. Looks awesome though, will use this method. If you make it into an answer I will pick it. – Jack Pettersson Apr 23 '15 at 13:41
  • Done. You should check Apache Commons website and its available libraries (commons-lang, commons-io, ...). It makes developer's life significantly easier when it comes to common tasks like "checking for null/empty/blank strings", "null or empty arrays", etc. – Pavel Horal Apr 23 '15 at 13:51
3

Java can be pretty strict and verbose in simple tasks like this. There are multiple projects which are trying to make developers life easier and the code more readable. One of the most popular is Apache Commons and its commons-lang library. I strongly suggest to go through its documentation just to see what it offers and tries to solve.

For your use case there is a nice convenient method StringUtils#left.

  • 1
    Personal sidenote - some commons subprojects are not that good, outdated or long surpassed by other project (e.g. dbcp by c3p0 or bonecp, logging by slf4j). Commons-lang is probably the only "undefeated champion" from this perspective. So be aware of this fact when checking those projects. – Pavel Horal Apr 23 '15 at 14:24
  • Thanks for the heads up! I checked out some other libraries and as you stated; they don't all look as robust as commons-lang. – Jack Pettersson Apr 24 '15 at 6:51
6

Only thing I can suggest is dropping it all down to one line:

return (a.length < 3) ? a : a.substring(0,3).toLowerCase();

This does exactly the same thing as your code:

if (a.length < 3) {
    return a
} else {
    return a.toLowerCase().substring(0, 3);
}

I took a note from the others' answers and moved .toLowerCase() after the substring operation. This prevents unnecessarily changing the cases of letters which would then be dropped.

2

If the requirement for not returning a lower-case String less then 3 characters can be relaxed, you could do

public static String getFirst3Chars(String str) {
    return str.toLowerCase().substring(0, Math.min(3, str.length()));
}
  • 2
    he does not want to lowecase when length < 3 – guido Apr 23 '15 at 13:35
1

There isn't specifically a method for this. You have options like this:

public static String makeThree(String a) {
    return a.substring(0, Math.min(3, a.length())).toLowerCase();
}

This also only converts the substring you actually want to lower case, instead of converting the whole thing and then throwing the rest away.

  • 2
    he does not want to lowecase when length < 3 – guido Apr 23 '15 at 13:35
  • @ᴳᵁᴵᴰᴼ I don't think that is certain from his question. – khelwood Apr 23 '15 at 20:44
1

Only suggestion i would recommend would consist of:

Moving toLowerCase as second operation - in your first if statement you will not upperCase your string when a.length < 3

Like so:

String baseString = (a.length < 3) ? a : a.substring(0,3);
return baseString.toLowerCase();
  • 1
    inlining conditions is not necessarily a good suggestion; in here it does not improve anything whatsoever, and you are calling toLowerCase in both cases (probabily because of lost readability due to inlining....) – guido Apr 23 '15 at 13:32
  • Tnnks for mentioning I fully agree. But I was wondering if such operation could be aquired with some features from JDK8, like Optional.In short-to enclose it in some sort of elegant object transformer. – Beri Apr 23 '15 at 13:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.