119

I need to sort an array of strings, but I need it so that null is always last. For example, the array:

var arr = [a, b, null, d, null]

When sorted ascending I need it to be sorted like [a, b, d, null, null] and when sorted descending I need it to be sorted like [d, b, a, null, null].

Is this possible? I tried the solution found below but it's not quite what I need.

How can one compare string and numeric values (respecting negative values, with null always last)?

1

9 Answers 9

237

Check out .sort() and do it with custom sorting. Example

function alphabetically(ascending) {
  return function (a, b) {
    // equal items sort equally
    if (a === b) {
        return 0;
    }

    // nulls sort after anything else
    if (a === null) {
        return 1;
    }
    if (b === null) {
        return -1;
    }

    // otherwise, if we're ascending, lowest sorts first
    if (ascending) {
        return a < b ? -1 : 1;
    }

    // if descending, highest sorts first
    return a < b ? 1 : -1;
  };
}



var arr = [null, "a", "z", null, "b"];

console.log(arr.sort(alphabetically(true)));
console.log(arr.sort(alphabetically(false)));

10
  • 10
    Can anyone explain why do we send 1 for a and -1 for b? if(a === null) { return 1; } else if(b === null){ return -1; }
    – prgmrDev
    Commented Jan 15, 2018 at 5:04
  • 2
    @prgmrDev see the sort documentation: "If compareFunction(a, b) is less than 0, sort a to an index lower than b (i.e. a comes first)." Commented Jan 24, 2019 at 7:57
  • @BartRömgens or anyone else, I'm still having trouble understanding that line in the documentation. Would you be able to elaborate a little more to help me out? Commented Jul 21, 2020 at 18:04
  • 1
    @JeffreyWen Basically you give a function to "sort()" and that function runs for every pair of elements. For example run this [1,2,3,4,5,6,7].sort(function(a,b){ console.log('comparing pair:', a,b); return -1; }) and then [1,2,3,4,5,6,7].sort(function(a,b){ console.log('comparing pair:', a,b); return 1; }) For every pair, you can return a negative or positive number, to change or not change the order of the pair. I hope that makes sense. Experiment with it and use console.log to see what the function does.
    – AntouanK
    Commented Jul 22, 2020 at 19:31
  • 1
    no need for first 3 else if-s, if is enough Commented May 20, 2022 at 8:32
107
+50

Use a custom compare function that discriminates against null values:

arr.sort(function(a, b) {
    return (a===null)-(b===null) || +(a>b)||-(a<b);
});

For descending order of the non-null values, just swap a and b in the direct comparison:

arr.sort(function(a, b) {
    return (a===null)-(b===null) || -(a>b)||+(a<b);
});
10
  • 3
    Used this technique to send empty dates to the bottom of the list when sorting dates in ascending order. Brilliant solution, thank you kindly!
    – mhodges
    Commented May 20, 2016 at 18:16
  • 2
    @cegprakash If exactly one of them is null, the (a===null)-(b===null) expression will evaluate to 1 or -1 (subtraction of booleans gets coerced to a number), when both are not null it will evaluate to 0 and the second part of the || expression will take effect.
    – Bergi
    Commented Nov 7, 2019 at 13:27
  • 2
    @AbhishekEkaanth You can swap a and b in the null comparisons: return (b===null)-(a===null) || …
    – Bergi
    Commented Sep 25, 2020 at 12:22
  • 1
    @Bergi - Sorry, you are of course correct. I was confused by my own use case! I needed to put null values first, but on reading your comment, I realised that you were discussing the descending order being for non-null values. I achieved non-null first with 'b===null - a === null...'. Apologies for my being thick-headed, and thanks for a handy answer!
    – richter
    Commented Jul 12, 2021 at 12:13
  • 1
    what does +(a>b)||-(a<b) do when both are not null? Isn't a-b sufficient for ascending?
    – cegprakash
    Commented Jan 10, 2022 at 11:50
25

Ascending

arr.sort((a, b) => (a != null ? a : Infinity) - (b != null ? b : Infinity))

Descending

arr.sort((a, b) => (b != null ? b : -Infinity) - (a != null ? a : -Infinity))

(For descending order if you don't have negative values in the array, I recommend to use 0 instead of -Infinity)

4
  • This will not correctly distinguish null and 0 though. You should == null in the condition of your ternary.
    – Bergi
    Commented Nov 7, 2019 at 13:24
  • 1
    ^ This was fixed
    – cegprakash
    Commented Jul 14, 2020 at 1:56
  • 1
    This can now be edited to use the nullish coallescing operator ??
    – pilchard
    Commented Mar 29, 2023 at 16:07
  • @pilchard: yes.. Ascending: arr.sort((a, b) => (a ?? Infinity) - (b ?? Infinity)); Descending: arr.sort((a, b) => (b ?? -Infinity) - (a ?? -Infinity)); Note that this will only work in ES2020 and later as nullish coalescing operator is very new
    – cegprakash
    Commented Nov 22, 2023 at 13:41
15

The simplest approach is to handle null first, then deal with non-null cases based on the desired order:

function sortnull(arr, ascending) {
  // default to ascending
  if (typeof(ascending) === "undefined")
    ascending = true;

  const multiplier = ascending ? 1 : -1;

  const sorter = function(a, b) {
    if (a === b)          // identical? return 0
      return 0;
    else if (a === null)  // a is null? last 
      return 1;
    else if (b === null)  // b is null? last
      return -1;
    else                  // compare, negate if descending
      return a.localeCompare(b) * multiplier;
  }

  return arr.sort(sorter);
}

const arr = ["a", "b", null, "d", null];

console.log(sortnull(arr));        // ascending   ["a", "b", "d", null, null]
console.log(sortnull(arr, true));  // ascending   ["a", "b", "d", null, null]
console.log(sortnull(arr, false)); // descending  ["d", "b", "a", null, null]

3

If you need natural sorting for numbers, or any of the options provided by Collator (including speed enhancements and respecting locale), try this approach, based off of Paul Roub's solution, cleaned up a bit. We almost always use numeric sorting, hence the defaults...

If you are not a Typescript fan, just strip off the :type specs or copy from the snippet.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Collator

const naturalCollator = new Intl.Collator(undefined, {numeric: true, sensitivity: 'base'});
const alphabeticCollator = new Intl.Collator(undefined, {});

function nullSort(descending: boolean = false, alphabetic: boolean = false) {
  return function (a: any, b: any): number {
    if (a === b) {
      return 0;
    }
    if (a === null) {
      return 1;
    }
    if (b === null) {
      return -1;
    }

    let ret
    if (alphabetic) {
      ret = alphabeticCollator.compare(a, b)
    } else {
      ret = naturalCollator.compare(a, b)
    }
    if (descending) {
      ret = -ret
    }
    return ret
  };
}

Use it like this.

// numeric, ascending (default)
myList.sort(nullSort());

// alphabetic, descending
myList.sort(nullSort(true, true));

You can modify the factory method to take a collator instead, for greater flexibility.

function nullSort(descending: boolean = false, collator: Collator = naturalCollator)

Working Snippet

const naturalCollator = new Intl.Collator(undefined, {
  numeric: true,
  sensitivity: 'base'
});
const alphabeticCollator = new Intl.Collator(undefined, {});

function nullSort(descending = false, alphabetic = false) {
  return function(a, b) {
    if (a === b) {
      return 0;
    }
    if (a === null) {
      return 1;
    }
    if (b === null) {
      return -1;
    }

    let ret
    if (alphabetic) {
      ret = alphabeticCollator.compare(a, b)
    } else {
      ret = naturalCollator.compare(a, b)
    }
    if (descending) {
      ret = -ret
    }
    return ret
  };
}

const items = [null, 10, 1, 100, null, 'hello', .1, null]

console.log(items.sort(nullSort()));

1

I implemented a custom sort function for an Ant Design table that handles dates, including scenarios where date values might be null or empty. This approach ensures a consistent sorting order, placing null or empty values at the end of the list, regardless of the sort direction. The function makes use of the localeCompare method for string comparison, which is useful for date strings in ISO format. Here's the code snippet:

 compare: (a, b, sortDirection) => {
        const aa = a.StartsOn || "";
        const bb = b.StartsOn || "";
    
        // Check if both are empty or null
        if (!aa && !bb) return 0; 
    
        // Ensure empty or null values always go last in both directions
        if (!aa) return 1; // aa is empty or null, it goes last
        if (!bb) return -1; // bb is empty or null, it goes last
    
        // Ascending order comparison
        if (sortDirection === "ascend") {
            return aa.localeCompare(bb);
        } 
        // Descending order comparison
        else if (sortDirection === "descend") {
            return bb.localeCompare(aa);
        }
    },

This solution simplifies the sorting logic by explicitly handling the sort direction (ascend or descend) and null or empty values. In my experience, incorporating the sort direction directly into the comparison logic makes the sorter more intuitive and straightforward, avoiding unnecessary complexity for what should be a simple problem.

0

I am sorting objects with a custom index and this works for me. I am not wanting to change the original array and it is important to keep the null indexes where they are.

let sorted = [...array].sort((a, b) => {
               if (!a || !b) return 0;
               else return a.CustomIndex - b.CustomIndex;
             });
1
  • Also, note that this only works if the index is null or undefined. If it is empty sort will overlook it. Commented Jun 4, 2020 at 17:45
0

My solution is to convert null to "" when doing comparison:

array.sort((a, b) => (a === null ? '' : a) - (b===null ? '': b))
-1

Do it like:

        var arr = [a, b, null, d, null]

        foreach ($arr as $key => $value) {
           if($value == null)
           unset($arr[$key]);
           $arr[] = $value;

        }
        // rebuild array index
        $arr = array_values($arr);

        echo '<pre>';print_r($arr);die;

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