272

Let's say I have a 1d numpy array

a = array([1,0,3])

I would like to encode this as a 2D one-hot array

b = array([[0,1,0,0], [1,0,0,0], [0,0,0,1]])

Is there a quick way to do this? Quicker than just looping over a to set elements of b, that is.

0

21 Answers 21

454

Your array a defines the columns of the nonzero elements in the output array. You need to also define the rows and then use fancy indexing:

>>> a = np.array([1, 0, 3])
>>> b = np.zeros((a.size, a.max()+1))
>>> b[np.arange(a.size),a] = 1
>>> b
array([[ 0.,  1.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.]])
6
  • 12
    @JamesAtwood it depends on the application but I'd make the max a parameter and not calculate it from the data. – Mohammad Moghimi Feb 8 '16 at 20:40
  • 7
    what if 'a' was 2d? and you want a 3-d one-hot matrix? – A.D Oct 18 '17 at 22:39
  • 13
    Can anyone point to an explanation of why this works, but the slice with [:, a] does not? – N. McA. Feb 16 '18 at 19:40
  • 1
    @ A.D. Solution for the 2d -> 3d case: stackoverflow.com/questions/36960320/… – cgnorthcutt Sep 29 '18 at 2:37
  • You can also use scipy.sparse. – mathtick Apr 8 '19 at 20:17
208
>>> values = [1, 0, 3]
>>> n_values = np.max(values) + 1
>>> np.eye(n_values)[values]
array([[ 0.,  1.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.]])
6
  • 13
    This solution is the only one useful for an input N-D matrix to one-hot N+1D matrix. Example: input_matrix=np.asarray([[0,1,1] , [1,1,2]]) ; np.eye(3)[input_matrix] # output 3D tensor – Isaías Mar 21 '17 at 16:06
  • 7
    +1 because this should be preferred over the accepted solution. For a more general solution though, values should be a Numpy array rather than a Python list, then it works in all dimensions, not only in 1D. – Alex Oct 21 '17 at 20:32
  • 12
    Note that taking np.max(values) + 1 as number of buckets might not be desirable if your data set is say randomly sampled and just by chance it may not contain max value. Number of buckets should be rather a parameter and assertion/check can be in place to check that each value is within 0 (incl) and buckets count (excl). – NightElfik Jan 19 '18 at 3:46
  • 3
    To me this solution is the best and can be easily generalized to any tensor: def one_hot(x, depth=10): return np.eye(depth)[x]. Note that giving the tensor x as index returns a tensor of x.shape eye rows. – cecconeurale Mar 27 '18 at 7:37
  • 7
    Easy way to "understand" this solution and why it works for N-dims (without reading numpy docs): at each location in the original matrix (values), we have an integer k, and we "put" the 1-hot vector eye(n)[k] in that location. This adds a dimension because we're "putting" a vector in the location of a scalar in the original matrix. – avivr Sep 24 '19 at 14:08
46

In case you are using keras, there is a built in utility for that:

from keras.utils.np_utils import to_categorical   

categorical_labels = to_categorical(int_labels, num_classes=3)

And it does pretty much the same as @YXD's answer (see source-code).

37

Here is what I find useful:

def one_hot(a, num_classes):
  return np.squeeze(np.eye(num_classes)[a.reshape(-1)])

Here num_classes stands for number of classes you have. So if you have a vector with shape of (10000,) this function transforms it to (10000,C). Note that a is zero-indexed, i.e. one_hot(np.array([0, 1]), 2) will give [[1, 0], [0, 1]].

Exactly what you wanted to have I believe.

PS: the source is Sequence models - deeplearning.ai

1
  • also, what's the reason of doing np.squeeze() since get the (vector a's size) many one hot encoded arrays using np.eye(num_classes)[a.reshape(-1)]. What you are simply doing is using np.eye` you are creating a diagonal matrix with each class index as 1 rest zero and later using the indexes provided by a.reshape(-1) producing the output corresponding to the index in np.eye(). I didn't understand the need of np.sqeeze since we use it to simply remove single dimensions which we will never have as in the output's dimension will always be (a_flattened_size, num_classes) – Anu Mar 14 '19 at 5:07
31

You can also use eye function of numpy:

numpy.eye(number of classes)[vector containing the labels]

2
  • 5
    For more clarity using np.identity(num_classes)[indices] might be better. Nice answer! – Oliver Sep 2 '19 at 11:13
  • That's the only absolutely pythonic answer in all its brevity. – Maksym Ganenko Jun 7 at 9:59
28

You can use sklearn.preprocessing.LabelBinarizer:

Example:

import sklearn.preprocessing
a = [1,0,3]
label_binarizer = sklearn.preprocessing.LabelBinarizer()
label_binarizer.fit(range(max(a)+1))
b = label_binarizer.transform(a)
print('{0}'.format(b))

output:

[[0 1 0 0]
 [1 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 1]]

Amongst other things, you may initialize sklearn.preprocessing.LabelBinarizer() so that the output of transform is sparse.

0
6

You can use the following code for converting into a one-hot vector:

let x is the normal class vector having a single column with classes 0 to some number:

import numpy as np
np.eye(x.max()+1)[x]

if 0 is not a class; then remove +1.

5

Here is a function that converts a 1-D vector to a 2-D one-hot array.

#!/usr/bin/env python
import numpy as np

def convertToOneHot(vector, num_classes=None):
    """
    Converts an input 1-D vector of integers into an output
    2-D array of one-hot vectors, where an i'th input value
    of j will set a '1' in the i'th row, j'th column of the
    output array.

    Example:
        v = np.array((1, 0, 4))
        one_hot_v = convertToOneHot(v)
        print one_hot_v

        [[0 1 0 0 0]
         [1 0 0 0 0]
         [0 0 0 0 1]]
    """

    assert isinstance(vector, np.ndarray)
    assert len(vector) > 0

    if num_classes is None:
        num_classes = np.max(vector)+1
    else:
        assert num_classes > 0
        assert num_classes >= np.max(vector)

    result = np.zeros(shape=(len(vector), num_classes))
    result[np.arange(len(vector)), vector] = 1
    return result.astype(int)

Below is some example usage:

>>> a = np.array([1, 0, 3])

>>> convertToOneHot(a)
array([[0, 1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 1]])

>>> convertToOneHot(a, num_classes=10)
array([[0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])
2
  • Note that this only works on vectors (and there is no assert to check vector shape ;) ). – johndodo May 12 '17 at 21:01
  • 1
    +1 for the generalized approach and parameters check. However, as a common practice, I suggest to NOT use asserts to perform checks on inputs. Use asserts only to verify internal intermediate conditions. Rather, convert all assert ___ into if not ___ raise Exception(<Reason>). – fnunnari Sep 23 '19 at 8:19
5

For 1-hot-encoding

   one_hot_encode=pandas.get_dummies(array)

For Example

ENJOY CODING

3
  • Thanks for the comment, but a brief description of what the code is doing would be very helpful! – Clarus Apr 10 '20 at 23:33
  • please refer the example – Shubham Mishra Apr 10 '20 at 23:47
  • @Clarus Checkout the below example. You can access the one hot encoding of each value in your np array by doing a one_hot_encode[value]. >>> import numpy as np >>> import pandas >>> a = np.array([1,0,3]) >>> one_hot_encode=pandas.get_dummies(a) >>> print(one_hot_encode) 0 1 3 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 >>> print(one_hot_encode[1]) 0 1 1 0 2 0 Name: 1, dtype: uint8 >>> print(one_hot_encode[0]) 0 0 1 1 2 0 Name: 0, dtype: uint8 >>> print(one_hot_encode[3]) 0 0 1 0 2 1 Name: 3, dtype: uint8 – Deepak Apr 11 '20 at 4:20
2

I think the short answer is no. For a more generic case in n dimensions, I came up with this:

# For 2-dimensional data, 4 values
a = np.array([[0, 1, 2], [3, 2, 1]])
z = np.zeros(list(a.shape) + [4])
z[list(np.indices(z.shape[:-1])) + [a]] = 1

I am wondering if there is a better solution -- I don't like that I have to create those lists in the last two lines. Anyway, I did some measurements with timeit and it seems that the numpy-based (indices/arange) and the iterative versions perform about the same.

2

Just to elaborate on the excellent answer from K3---rnc, here is a more generic version:

def onehottify(x, n=None, dtype=float):
    """1-hot encode x with the max value n (computed from data if n is None)."""
    x = np.asarray(x)
    n = np.max(x) + 1 if n is None else n
    return np.eye(n, dtype=dtype)[x]

Also, here is a quick-and-dirty benchmark of this method and a method from the currently accepted answer by YXD (slightly changed, so that they offer the same API except that the latter works only with 1D ndarrays):

def onehottify_only_1d(x, n=None, dtype=float):
    x = np.asarray(x)
    n = np.max(x) + 1 if n is None else n
    b = np.zeros((len(x), n), dtype=dtype)
    b[np.arange(len(x)), x] = 1
    return b

The latter method is ~35% faster (MacBook Pro 13 2015), but the former is more general:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> np.random.seed(42)
>>> a = np.random.randint(0, 9, size=(10_000,))
>>> a
array([6, 3, 7, ..., 5, 8, 6])
>>> %timeit onehottify(a, 10)
188 µs ± 5.03 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
>>> %timeit onehottify_only_1d(a, 10)
139 µs ± 2.78 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
1

I recently ran into a problem of same kind and found said solution which turned out to be only satisfying if you have numbers that go within a certain formation. For example if you want to one-hot encode following list:

all_good_list = [0,1,2,3,4]

go ahead, the posted solutions are already mentioned above. But what if considering this data:

problematic_list = [0,23,12,89,10]

If you do it with methods mentioned above, you will likely end up with 90 one-hot columns. This is because all answers include something like n = np.max(a)+1. I found a more generic solution that worked out for me and wanted to share with you:

import numpy as np
import sklearn
sklb = sklearn.preprocessing.LabelBinarizer()
a = np.asarray([1,2,44,3,2])
n = np.unique(a)
sklb.fit(n)
b = sklb.transform(a)

I hope someone encountered same restrictions on above solutions and this might come in handy

1

Such type of encoding are usually part of numpy array. If you are using a numpy array like this :

a = np.array([1,0,3])

then there is very simple way to convert that to 1-hot encoding

out = (np.arange(4) == a[:,None]).astype(np.float32)

That's it.

1
  • p will be a 2d ndarray.
  • We want to know which value is the highest in a row, to put there 1 and everywhere else 0.

clean and easy solution:

max_elements_i = np.expand_dims(np.argmax(p, axis=1), axis=1)
one_hot = np.zeros(p.shape)
np.put_along_axis(one_hot, max_elements_i, 1, axis=1)
0

Here is an example function that I wrote to do this based upon the answers above and my own use case:

def label_vector_to_one_hot_vector(vector, one_hot_size=10):
    """
    Use to convert a column vector to a 'one-hot' matrix

    Example:
        vector: [[2], [0], [1]]
        one_hot_size: 3
        returns:
            [[ 0.,  0.,  1.],
             [ 1.,  0.,  0.],
             [ 0.,  1.,  0.]]

    Parameters:
        vector (np.array): of size (n, 1) to be converted
        one_hot_size (int) optional: size of 'one-hot' row vector

    Returns:
        np.array size (vector.size, one_hot_size): converted to a 'one-hot' matrix
    """
    squeezed_vector = np.squeeze(vector, axis=-1)

    one_hot = np.zeros((squeezed_vector.size, one_hot_size))

    one_hot[np.arange(squeezed_vector.size), squeezed_vector] = 1

    return one_hot

label_vector_to_one_hot_vector(vector=[[2], [0], [1]], one_hot_size=3)
0

I am adding for completion a simple function, using only numpy operators:

   def probs_to_onehot(output_probabilities):
        argmax_indices_array = np.argmax(output_probabilities, axis=1)
        onehot_output_array = np.eye(np.unique(argmax_indices_array).shape[0])[argmax_indices_array.reshape(-1)]
        return onehot_output_array

It takes as input a probability matrix: e.g.:

[[0.03038822 0.65810204 0.16549407 0.3797123 ] ... [0.02771272 0.2760752 0.3280924 0.33458805]]

And it will return

[[0 1 0 0] ... [0 0 0 1]]

0

Here's a dimensionality-independent standalone solution.

This will convert any N-dimensional array arr of nonnegative integers to a one-hot N+1-dimensional array one_hot, where one_hot[i_1,...,i_N,c] = 1 means arr[i_1,...,i_N] = c. You can recover the input via np.argmax(one_hot, -1)

def expand_integer_grid(arr, n_classes):
    """

    :param arr: N dim array of size i_1, ..., i_N
    :param n_classes: C
    :returns: one-hot N+1 dim array of size i_1, ..., i_N, C
    :rtype: ndarray

    """
    one_hot = np.zeros(arr.shape + (n_classes,))
    axes_ranges = [range(arr.shape[i]) for i in range(arr.ndim)]
    flat_grids = [_.ravel() for _ in np.meshgrid(*axes_ranges, indexing='ij')]
    one_hot[flat_grids + [arr.ravel()]] = 1
    assert((one_hot.sum(-1) == 1).all())
    assert(np.allclose(np.argmax(one_hot, -1), arr))
    return one_hot
0

Use the following code. It works best.

def one_hot_encode(x):
"""
    argument
        - x: a list of labels
    return
        - one hot encoding matrix (number of labels, number of class)
"""
encoded = np.zeros((len(x), 10))

for idx, val in enumerate(x):
    encoded[idx][val] = 1

return encoded

Found it here P.S You don't need to go into the link.

4
  • 6
    You should avoid using loops with numpy – Kenan Mar 1 '19 at 2:42
  • It does not answer the question: "Is there a quick way to do this? Quicker than just looping over a to set elements of b, that is." – Alexandre Huat Jul 6 '20 at 10:00
  • @AlexandreHuat You can use the numpy function np.eye() – Inaam Ilahi Oct 22 '20 at 9:58
  • 1
    Then you should make an answer where you say that one can use `numpy.eye() (but it was already done by another user). Please, make sure to read questions and already posted answers carefully in order to maintain the quality of stackoverflow and the community. – Alexandre Huat Oct 22 '20 at 15:11
0

Using a Neuraxle pipeline step:

  1. Set up your example
import numpy as np
a = np.array([1,0,3])
b = np.array([[0,1,0,0], [1,0,0,0], [0,0,0,1]])
  1. Do the actual conversion
from neuraxle.steps.numpy import OneHotEncoder
encoder = OneHotEncoder(nb_columns=4)
b_pred = encoder.transform(a)
  1. Assert it works
assert b_pred == b

Link to documentation: neuraxle.steps.numpy.OneHotEncoder

0
def one_hot(n, class_num, col_wise=True):
  a = np.eye(class_num)[n.reshape(-1)]
  return a.T if col_wise else a

# Column for different hot
print(one_hot(np.array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 8, 7]), 10))
# Row for different hot
print(one_hot(np.array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 8, 7]), 10, col_wise=False))
-1

If using tensorflow, there is one_hot():

import tensorflow as tf
import numpy as np

a = np.array([1, 0, 3])
depth = 4
b = tf.one_hot(a, depth)
# <tf.Tensor: shape=(3, 3), dtype=float32, numpy=
# array([[0., 1., 0.],
#        [1., 0., 0.],
#        [0., 0., 0.]], dtype=float32)>

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