29

I am looking for a way of performing a bitwise AND on a 64 bit integer in JavaScript.

JavaScript will cast all of its double values into signed 32-bit integers to do the bitwise operations (details here).

31

Javascript represents all numbers as 64-bit double precision IEEE 754 floating point numbers (see the ECMAscript spec, section 8.5.) All positive integers up to 2^53 can be encoded precisely. Larger integers get their least significant bits clipped. This leaves the question of how can you even represent a 64-bit integer in Javascript -- the native number data type clearly can't precisely represent a 64-bit int.

The following illustrates this. Although javascript appears to be able to parse hexadecimal numbers representing 64-bit numbers, the underlying numeric representation does not hold 64 bits. Try the following in your browser:

<html>
  <head>
    <script language="javascript">
      function showPrecisionLimits() {
        document.getElementById("r50").innerHTML = 0x0004000000000001 - 0x0004000000000000;
        document.getElementById("r51").innerHTML = 0x0008000000000001 - 0x0008000000000000;
        document.getElementById("r52").innerHTML = 0x0010000000000001 - 0x0010000000000000;
        document.getElementById("r53").innerHTML = 0x0020000000000001 - 0x0020000000000000;
        document.getElementById("r54").innerHTML = 0x0040000000000001 - 0x0040000000000000;
      }
    </script>
  </head>
  <body onload="showPrecisionLimits()">
    <p>(2^50+1) - (2^50) = <span id="r50"></span></p>
    <p>(2^51+1) - (2^51) = <span id="r51"></span></p>
    <p>(2^52+1) - (2^52) = <span id="r52"></span></p>
    <p>(2^53+1) - (2^53) = <span id="r53"></span></p>
    <p>(2^54+1) - (2^54) = <span id="r54"></span></p>
  </body>
</html>

In Firefox, Chrome and IE I'm getting the following. If numbers were stored in their full 64-bit glory, the result should have been 1 for all the substractions. Instead, you can see how the difference between 2^53+1 and 2^53 is lost.

(2^50+1) - (2^50) = 1
(2^51+1) - (2^51) = 1
(2^52+1) - (2^52) = 1
(2^53+1) - (2^53) = 0
(2^54+1) - (2^54) = 0

So what can you do?

If you choose to represent a 64-bit integer as two 32-bit numbers, then applying a bitwise AND is as simple as applying 2 bitwise AND's, to the low and high 32-bit 'words'.

For example:

var a = [ 0x0000ffff, 0xffff0000 ];
var b = [ 0x00ffff00, 0x00ffff00 ];
var c = [ a[0] & b[0], a[1] & b[1] ];

document.body.innerHTML = c[0].toString(16) + ":" + c[1].toString(16);

gets you:

ff00:ff0000
  • 1
    Thanks. In this case I am actually reading in a binary string containing a 64-bit value. So I could somehow turn that into two 32 bit numbers and use my own internal representation to manage that data. – Toby Hede Jun 6 '10 at 22:09
  • Hey Toby; what do you mean by binary string? If this is a sequence of characters, each of which is the character equivalent of an 8-bit byte, you could do: var a = [ s.charCodeAt(0) + (s.charCodeAt(1) << 8) + (s.charCodeAt(2) << 16) + (s.charCodeAt(3) << 24), s.charCodeAt(4) + (s.charCodeAt(5) << 8) + (s.charCodeAt(6) << 16) + (s.charCodeAt(7) << 24) ]; Just keep an eye on the endian-ness of things. – Oren Trutner Jun 7 '10 at 3:08
  • @Orent Trutner: be careful here: with Unicode, a char code could exceed 255. I think that your code fails as soon as one of the bytes has the high bit set. – nalply Aug 28 '11 at 8:12
  • Indeed. To-date, I am still not clear on how the OP's 64-bit numbers were originally represented. "a binary string", as in the first comment, could mean 8-bit characters, 16-bit characters, or even a string of 64 "0" and "1" characters. – Oren Trutner Aug 28 '11 at 16:49
  • Here is some more info if you use javascript with WinRT: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh710232(v=vs.94).aspx A Windows Runtime Int64 is a signed 64-bit integer, represented as a standard number if it falls within the range [-2^53, 2^53]. – Evert Sep 25 '12 at 11:54
11

Here is code for AND int64 numbers, you can replace AND with other bitwise operation

function and(v1, v2) {
    var hi = 0x80000000;
    var low = 0x7fffffff;
    var hi1 = ~~(v1 / hi);
    var hi2 = ~~(v2 / hi);
    var low1 = v1 & low;
    var low2 = v2 & low;
    var h = hi1 & hi2;
    var l = low1 & low2;
    return h*hi + l;
}
  • Note that to use another bitwise operation you would replace & in the expressions for h and l. – malthe Dec 3 '18 at 21:24
7

Javascript doesn't support 64 bit integers out of the box. This is what I ended up doing:

  1. Found long.js, a self contained Long implementation on github.
  2. Convert the string value representing the 64 bit number to a Long.
  3. Extract the high and low 32 bit values
  4. Do a 32 bit bitwise and between the high and low bits, separately
  5. Initialise a new 64 bit Long from the low and high bit
  6. If the number is > 0 then there is correlation between the two numbers

Note: for the code example below to work you need to load long.js.

// Handy to output leading zeros to make it easier to compare the bits when outputting to the console
function zeroPad(num, places){
    var zero = places - num.length + 1;
  return Array(+(zero > 0 && zero)).join('0') + num;
}

// 2^3 = 8
var val1 = Long.fromString('8', 10);
var val1High = val1.getHighBitsUnsigned();
var val1Low = val1.getLowBitsUnsigned();

// 2^61 = 2305843009213693960
var val2 = Long.fromString('2305843009213693960', 10);
var val2High = val2.getHighBitsUnsigned();
var val2Low = val2.getLowBitsUnsigned();

console.log('2^3 & (2^3 + 2^63)')
console.log(zeroPad(val1.toString(2), 64));
console.log(zeroPad(val2.toString(2), 64));

var bitwiseAndResult = Long.fromBits(val1Low & val2Low, val1High & val2High, true);

console.log(bitwiseAndResult);
console.log(zeroPad(bitwiseAndResult.toString(2), 64));
console.log('Correlation betwen val1 and val2 ?');
console.log(bitwiseAndResult > 0);

Console output:

2^3

0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001000

2^3 + 2^63

0010000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001000

2^3 & (2^3 + 2^63)

0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001000

Correlation between val1 and val2?

true

4

The Closure library has goog.math.Long with a bitwise add() method.

2

This can now be done with the new BigInt built-in numeric type. BigInt is currently (July 2019) only available in certain browsers, see the following link for details:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/BigInt

I have tested bitwise operations using BigInts in Chrome 67 and can confirm that they work as expected with up to 64 bit values.

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