10

I have the following data and what I want to do is

[(13, 'D'), (14, 'T'), (32, '6'), (45, 'T'), (47, '2'), (48, '0'), (49, '2'), (50, '0'), (51, 'T'), (53, '2'), (54, '0'), (13, 'A'), (14, 'T'), (32, '6'), (45, 'A'), (47, '2'), (48, '0'), (49, '2'), (50, '0'), (51, 'X')]

Is for each key count the instances of the value (a 1 string character). So I first did a map:

.map(lambda x: (x[0], [x[1], 1]))

Making it now a key/tuple of:

[(13, ['D', 1]), (14, ['T', 1]), (32, ['6', 1]), (45, ['T', 1]), (47, ['2', 1]), (48, ['0', 1]), (49, ['2', 1]), (50, ['0', 1]), (51, ['T', 1]), (53, ['2', 1]), (54, ['0', 1]), (13, ['A', 1]), (14, ['T', 1]), (32, ['6', 1]), (45, ['A', 1]), (47, ['2', 1]), (48, ['0', 1]), (49, ['2', 1]), (50, ['0', 1]), (51, ['X', 1])]

I just cant for the last part figure out how to for each key count the instances of that letter. For instance Key 13 will have 1 D and 1 A. While 14 will have 2 T's, etc.

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  • 1
    You want to first groupByKey, and then perform your counts on the characters that have been grouped. – mattsilver Apr 23 '15 at 20:35
7

I'm much more familiar with Spark in Scala, so there may be better ways than Counter to count the characters in the iterable produced by groupByKey, but here's an option:

from collections import Counter

rdd = sc.parallelize([(13, 'D'), (14, 'T'), (32, '6'), (45, 'T'), (47, '2'), (48, '0'), (49, '2'), (50, '0'), (51, 'T'), (53, '2'), (54, '0'), (13, 'A'), (14, 'T'), (32, '6'), (45, 'A'), (47, '2'), (48, '0'), (49, '2'), (50, '0'), (51, 'X')]) 
rdd.groupByKey().mapValues(Counter).collect()

[(48, Counter({'0': 2})),
 (32, Counter({'6': 2})),
 (49, Counter({'2': 2})),
 (50, Counter({'0': 2})),
 (51, Counter({'X': 1, 'T': 1})),
 (53, Counter({'2': 1})),
 (13, Counter({'A': 1, 'D': 1})),
 (45, Counter({'A': 1, 'T': 1})),
 (14, Counter({'T': 2})),
 (54, Counter({'0': 1})),
 (47, Counter({'2': 2}))]
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  • 3
    Oh, you used Counter already! Unfortunately, one should avoid groupByKey because it aggregates all data on master. And 2 operations instead of one is insufficient either. But 1 vote for compactness! – Nikita Apr 23 '15 at 21:38
  • @ipoteka Interesting I didn't know about inefficiency of groupByKey do you have a good reference that elaborates on that? – mattsilver Apr 23 '15 at 21:40
  • 3
  • Nice link, very nice figures. Makes perfect sense. I suspect sometimes groupByKey will still be "fast enough" but very good to know. – mattsilver Apr 23 '15 at 21:51
  • @Nikita it does not aggregate all data on “master”. But it is shuffled, in a non-aggregated form, to the executors. And that's the key difference with reduceByKey, which performs one aggregation step before shuffling the data, thus (typically) sending far less data over the network. – Oliver W. Jun 12 '20 at 6:29
5

Instead of:

.map(lambda x: (x[0], [x[1], 1]))

We could do this:

.map(lambda x: ((x[0], x[1]), 1))

And in the last step, we could use reduceByKey and add. Note that add comes from the operator package.

Putting it together:

from operator import add
rdd = sc.parallelize([(13, 'D'), (14, 'T'), (32, '6'), (45, 'T'), (47, '2'), (48, '0'), (49, '2'), (50, '0'), (51, 'T'), (53, '2'), (54, '0'), (13, 'A'), (14, 'T'), (32, '6'), (45, 'A'), (47, '2'), (48, '0'), (49, '2'), (50, '0'), (51, 'X')]) 
rdd.map(lambda x: ((x[0], x[1]), 1)).reduceByKey(add).collect()
4

If i understood you right, you can do it in one operation combineByKey:

from collections import Counter
x = sc.parallelize([(13, 'D'), (14, 'T'), (32, '6'), (45, 'T'), (47, '2'), (48, '0'), (49, '2'), (50, '0'), (51, 'T'), (53, '2'), (54, '0'), (13, 'A'), (14, 'T'), (32, '6'), (45, 'A'), (47, '2'), (48, '0'), (49, '2'), (50, '0'), (51, 'X')]) 
result = x.combineByKey(lambda value:  {value: 1}, 
...                     lambda x, value:  value.get(x,0) + 1,
...                     lambda x, y: dict(Counter(x) + Counter(y)))
result.collect()
[(32, {'6': 2}), (48, {'0': 2}), (49, {'2': 2}), (53, {'2': 1}), (13, {'A': 1, 'D': 1}), (45, {'A': 1, 'T': 1}), (50, {'0': 2}), (54, {'0': 1}), (14, {'T': 2}), (51, {'X': 1, 'T': 1}), (47, {'2': 2})]
9
  • It looks like with this solution 13 has ('A', 2) instead of [('A', 1), ('D', 1)] – mattsilver Apr 23 '15 at 21:08
  • Hm, i assumed 13 corresponds to 'A' only, I will change my answer. thx! – Nikita Apr 23 '15 at 21:11
  • OP wants a count for each character associated with each key – mattsilver Apr 23 '15 at 21:13
  • @ohruunuruus I edited it, but im not sure the solution is "pythonic" enough. – Nikita Apr 23 '15 at 21:33
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    One thing I am getting though is: AttributeError: 'str' object has no attribute 'get' – theMadKing Apr 23 '15 at 22:42
0

I tried by using functions and mapValues() transformation

def f(Counter): return Counter

from collections import Counter

rdd=sc.parallelize([(13, 'D'), (14, 'T'), (32, '6'), (45, 'T'), (47, '2'), (48, '0'), (49, '2'), (50, '0'), (51, 'T'), (53, '2'), (54, '0'), (13, 'A'), (14, 'T'), (32, '6'), (45, 'A'), (47, '2'), (48, '0'), (49, '2'), (50, '0'), (51, 'X')])
rdd.groupByKey().mapValues(Counter).collect()

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