60

I just want to get the ASCII value of a single char string in Swift. This is how I'm currently doing it:

var singleChar = "a"
println(singleChar.unicodeScalars[singleChar.unicodeScalars.startIndex].value) //prints: 97

This is so ugly though. There must be a simpler way.

14 Answers 14

96

edit/update Swift 5

In Swift 5 you can use the new character properties isASCII and asciiValue

Character("a").isASCII       // true
Character("a").asciiValue    // 97

Character("á").isASCII       // false
Character("á").asciiValue    // nil

Old answer

You can create an extension:

Swift 4.2 or later

extension Character {
    var isAscii: Bool {
        return unicodeScalars.allSatisfy { $0.isASCII }
    }
    var ascii: UInt32? {
        return isAscii ? unicodeScalars.first?.value : nil
    }
}

extension StringProtocol {
    var ascii: [UInt32] {
        return compactMap { $0.ascii }
    }
}

Character("a").isAscii  // true
Character("a").ascii    // 97

Character("á").isAscii  // false
Character("á").ascii    // nil

"abc".ascii            // [97, 98, 99]
"abc".ascii[0]         // 97
"abc".ascii[1]         // 98
"abc".ascii[2]         // 99
12
UnicodeScalar("1")!.value // returns 49

Swift 3.1

  • Never a good idea to force unwrap a value. – ixany Feb 3 at 10:35
  • @ixany forced unwraps exist for a reason, plus in this case we're 101% sure the initializer won't fail ("1" is a valid character). – Cristik Feb 6 at 20:32
  • @Cristik Disagree. In general, you can’t be sure that an input value won’t fail forever. So why not playing it safe? Better approach would be: guard let value = UnicodeScalar("1")?.value else { return }. – ixany Feb 6 at 21:22
  • @ixany, you disagree that "1" is a valid character? :) – Cristik Feb 6 at 21:23
  • @Cristik if let or guard let statements too exist for a reason. I’m convinced that, whenever possible, you should play things safe. And that we, as more experienced developer, should provide good coding style and best practices for all the newcomers here at stackoverflow. It was not meant as an offence. – ixany Feb 6 at 21:35
10

You can use NSString's characterAtIndex to accomplish this...

var singleCharString = "a" as NSString
var singleCharValue = singleCharString.characterAtIndex(0)
println("The value of \(singleCharString) is \(singleCharValue)")  // The value of a is 97
  • "a".characterAtIndex(0) works. – vacawama Apr 24 '15 at 0:55
  • 1
    @vacawama Swift 4, I am getting error error: value of type 'String' has no member 'character'. but when using "a" as NSString its working :) – Kamaldeep singh Bhatia Apr 30 '18 at 14:15
10

Now in Xcode 7.1 and Swift 2.1

var singleChar = "a"

singleChar.unicodeScalars.first?.value
4

Swift 4.2

The easiest way to get ASCII values from a Swift string is below

let str = "Swift string"
for ascii in str.utf8 {
    print(ascii)
}

Output:

83
119
105
102
116
32
115
116
114
105
110
103
  • Note that this will print also non ascii characters if present in the string. You can use string data method using ascii encoding to avoid invalid characters in the string use allowLossyConversion for ascii in str.data(using: .ascii, allowLossyConversion: true)! { – Leo Dabus Jul 17 '18 at 0:44
3

A slightly shorter way of doing this could be:

first(singleChar.unicodeScalars)!.value

As with the subscript version, this will crash if your string is actually empty, so if you’re not 100% sure, use the optional:

if let ascii = first(singleChar.unicodeScalars)?.value {

}

Or, if you want to be extra-paranoid,

if let char = first(singleChar.unicodeScalars) where char.isASCII() {
    let ascii = char.value
}
3

Here's my implementation, it returns an array of the ASCII values.

extension String {

    func asciiValueOfString() -> [UInt32] {

      var retVal = [UInt32]()
      for val in self.unicodeScalars where val.isASCII() {
          retVal.append(UInt32(val))
      }
      return retVal
    }
}

Note: Yes it's Swift 2 compatible.

2

The way you're doing it is right. If you don't like the verbosity of the indexing, you can avoid it by cycling through the unicode scalars:

var x : UInt32 = 0
let char = "a"
for sc in char.unicodeScalars {x = sc.value; break}

You can actually omit the break in this case, of course, since there is only one unicode scalar.

Or, convert to an Array and use Int indexing (the last resort of the desperate):

let char = "a"
let x = Array(char.unicodeScalars)[0].value
2

Swift 4.1

https://oleb.net/blog/2017/11/swift-4-strings/

let flags = "99_problems"
flags.unicodeScalars.map {
    "\(String($0.value, radix: 16, uppercase: true))"
}

Result:

["39", "39", "5F", "70", "72", "6F", "62", "6C", "65", "6D", "73"]

1
var singchar = "a" as NSString

print(singchar.character(at: 0))

Swift 3.1

1

There's also the UInt8(ascii: Unicode.Scalar) initializer on UInt8.

var singleChar = "a"
UInt8(ascii: singleChar.unicodeScalars[singleChar.startIndex])
  • Note that this is a non fallible initialiser. It will crash if you pass an invalid character which its value is out of the ascii range 0..<128. "Fatal error: Code point value does not fit into ASCII" – Leo Dabus Jul 17 '18 at 0:08
0

Swift 4

print("c".utf8["c".utf8.startIndex])

or

let cu = "c".utf8
print(cu[cu.startIndex])

Both print 99. Works for any ASCII character.

0

Swift 4+

Char to ASCII

let charVal = String(ch).unicodeScalars
var asciiVal = charVal[charVal.startIndex].value

ASCII to Char

let char = Character(UnicodeScalar(asciiVal)!)
0

With Swift 5, you can pick one of the following approaches in order to get the ASCII numeric representation of a character.


#1. Using Character's asciiValue property

Character has a property called asciiValue. asciiValue has the following declaration:

var asciiValue: UInt8? { get }

The ASCII encoding value of this character, if it is an ASCII character.

The following Playground sample codes show how to use asciiValue in order to get the ASCII encoding value of a character:

let character: Character = "a"
print(character.asciiValue) //prints: Optional(97)
let string = "a"
print(string.first?.asciiValue) //prints: Optional(97)
let character: Character = "👍"
print(character.asciiValue) //prints: nil

#2. Using Character's isASCII property and Unicode.Scalar's value property

As an alternative, you can check that the first character of a string is an ASCII character (using Character's isASCII property) then get the numeric representation of its first Unicode scalar (using Unicode.Scalar's value property). The Playground sample code below show how to proceed:

let character: Character = "a"
if character.isASCII, let scalar = character.unicodeScalars.first {
    print(scalar.value)
} else {
    print("Not an ASCII character")
}
/*
 prints: 97
 */
let string = "a"
if let character = string.first, character.isASCII, let scalar = character.unicodeScalars.first {
    print(scalar.value)
} else {
    print("Not an ASCII character")
}
/*
 prints: 97
 */
let character: Character = "👍"
if character.isASCII, let scalar = character.unicodeScalars.first {
    print(scalar.value)
} else {
    print("Not an ASCII character")
}
/*
 prints: Not an ASCII character
 */

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