60

I have an input text:

<input name="Email" type="text" id="Email" value="email@abc.example" />

I want to put a default value like "What's your programming question? be specific." in Stack Overflow, and when the user click on it the default value disapear.

13 Answers 13

111

For future reference, I have to include the HTML5 way to do this.

<input name="Email" type="text" id="Email" value="email@abc.example" placeholder="What's your programming question ? be specific." />

If you have a HTML5 doctype and a HTML5-compliant browser, this will work. However, many browsers do not currently support this, so at least Internet Explorer users will not be able to see your placeholder. However, see JQuery HTML5 placeholder fix « Kamikazemusic.com for a solution. Using that, you'll be very modern and standards-compliant, while also providing the functionality to most users.

Also, the provided link is a well-tested and well-developed solution, which should work out of the box.

3
  • Good answer, very relevant nowadays. Works good as <textarea placeholder="Write something..."></textarea> too. Jan 26, 2013 at 0:03
  • 2
    value="" seems to overrides the placeholder and it doesn't work with both of them present.
    – LTech
    Sep 15, 2013 at 16:49
  • 1
    @Brian: The link works for me, but I added a link to archive.org's version of the page from around the time I wrote this answer. Keep in mind that that was in 2010 - nowadays all modern browsers support the placeholder attribute, so you shouldn't need - and probably shouldn't use - a compatibility-enhancing script.
    – MvanGeest
    Jan 14, 2016 at 18:20
64

Although, this solution works, I would recommend you try MvanGeest's solution below which uses the placeholder-attribute and a JavaScript fallback for browsers which don't support it yet.

If you are looking for a Mootools equivalent to the jQuery fallback in MvanGeest's reply, here is one.

--

You should probably use onfocus and onblur events in order to support keyboard users who tab through forms.

Here's an example:

<input type="text" value="email@abc.example" name="Email" id="Email"
 onblur="if (this.value == '') {this.value = 'email@abc.example';}"
 onfocus="if (this.value == 'email@abc.example') {this.value = '';}" />
16
  • 2
    Seconded. -1 for DOM pollution, there are more semantic solutions (not to mention cleaner, shorter etc.)
    – MvanGeest
    Jun 6, 2010 at 13:56
  • 2
    I thought the asker just wanted a simple solution, so I just gave him the simplest without much second thought. But, I think the ideal solution (as you have pointed out) would be to use the placeholder-attribute with a Javascript fallback for browsers who don't support it yet.
    – mqchen
    Jun 6, 2010 at 14:26
  • 3
    @roosteronacid - You're confusing clean source with a clean DOM, these are 2 very different concepts. This is an alternative way of attaching the handler, the DOM will see very little difference between this an an unobtrusive method. The markup is not the DOM, it's the structure from which the DOM is initialized. Jun 6, 2010 at 14:34
  • 1
    @Nick: you're right. Polluting the source is what I'm getting at.
    – cllpse
    Jun 6, 2010 at 14:37
  • 3
    IMHO there is nothing wrong with using the HTML attributes. Most importantly its not "polluting the DOM". It is the best and most reliable way to set event listeners that work immediately without having to wait for on-DOM-ready/onload. The only improvement that could be done would be to extract the inline code into functions.
    – RoToRa
    Jun 7, 2010 at 7:42
26

This is somewhat cleaner, i think. Note the usage of the "defaultValue" property of the input:

<script>
function onBlur(el) {
    if (el.value == '') {
        el.value = el.defaultValue;
    }
}
function onFocus(el) {
    if (el.value == el.defaultValue) {
        el.value = '';
    }
}
</script>
<form>
<input type="text" value="[some default value]" onblur="onBlur(this)" onfocus="onFocus(this)" />
</form>
0
7

Using jQuery, you can do:

$("input:text").each(function ()
{
    // store default value
    var v = this.value;

    $(this).blur(function ()
    {
        // if input is empty, reset value to default 
        if (this.value.length == 0) this.value = v;
    }).focus(function ()
    {
        // when input is focused, clear its contents
        this.value = "";
    }); 
});

And you could stuff all this into a custom plug-in, like so:

jQuery.fn.hideObtrusiveText = function ()
{
    return this.each(function ()
    {
        var v = this.value;

        $(this).blur(function ()
        {
            if (this.value.length == 0) this.value = v;
        }).focus(function ()
        {
            this.value = "";
        }); 
    });
};

Here's how you would use the plug-in:

$("input:text").hideObtrusiveText();

Advantages to using this code is:

  • Its unobtrusive and doesn't pollute the DOM
  • Code re-use: it works on multiple fields
  • It figures out the default value of inputs by itself



Non-jQuery approach:

function hideObtrusiveText(id)
{
    var e = document.getElementById(id);

    var v = e.value;

    e.onfocus = function ()
    {
        e.value = "";
    };

    e.onblur = function ()
    {
        if (e.value.length == 0) e.value = v;
    };
}
4
  • 1
    3 comments here: 1) if (this.value == v) this.value = v; should be if (this.value === "") this.value = v;, 2) You're clearing the value on focus, even if it's a valid, non-default value, and 3) Don't assume they're using jQuery. Jun 6, 2010 at 13:47
  • Aye. I spotted the mistake and corrected it. Thanks thou Nick :)
    – cllpse
    Jun 6, 2010 at 13:53
  • Your solution still clears the element if I put any input and re-focus the element, this wouldn't be desirable behavior. Jun 6, 2010 at 14:02
  • @NickCraver, do we really need to use === in this case? I think we can always assume that a text input's value is a string and nothing but "" would evaluate? Nov 17, 2011 at 15:15
3

Enter the following inside the tag, just add onFocus="value=''" so that your final code looks like this:

<input type="email" id="Email" onFocus="value=''"> 

This makes use of the javascript onFocus() event holder.

2

Just use a placeholder tag in your input instead of value

1
  • I did not know that attribute existed and it works great, thanks!
    – jacktrader
    Jun 20, 2017 at 18:42
1

<input name="Email" type="text" id="Email" placeholder="enter your question" />

The placeholder attribute specifies a short hint that describes the expected value of an input field (e.g. a sample value or a short description of the expected format).

The short hint is displayed in the input field before the user enters a value.

Note: The placeholder attribute works with the following input types: text, search, url, tel, email, and password.

I think this will help.

2
  • You're showcasing the use of placeholder but a quick description on the topic would really help others.
    – Anthony
    Nov 20, 2014 at 14:43
  • 1
    I have edited my answer and i hope this much description about placeholder will help people.
    – kkk
    Nov 21, 2014 at 14:22
1

we can do it without using js in the following way using the "placeholder" attribute of HTML5 ( the default text disappears when the user starts to type in, but not on just clicking )

<input type="email" id="email" placeholder="xyz@abc.example">

see this: http://www.w3schools.com/html/tryit.asp?filename=tryhtml5_input_placeholder

0

Why remove value? its useful, but why not try CSS

input[submit] {
   font-size: 0 !important;
}

Value is important to check & validate ur PHP

0

Here is a jQuery solution. I always let the default value reappear when a user clears the input field.

<input name="Email" value="What's your programming question ? be specific." type="text" id="Email" value="email@abc.com" />

<script>
$("#Email").blur(
    function (){
        if ($(this).val() == "")
            $(this).val($(this).prop("defaultValue"));
        }
).focus(
    function (){
        if ($(this).val() == $(this).prop("defaultValue"))
            $(this).val("");
    }
);
</script>
0

I didn't see any really simple answers like this one, so maybe it will help someone out.

var inputText = document.getElementById("inputText");
inputText.onfocus = function(){ if (inputText.value != ""){ inputText.value = "";}; }
inputText.onblur = function(){ if (inputText.value != "default value"){ inputText.value = "default value";}; }
0

Here is an easy way.

#animal represents any buttons from the DOM.
#animal-value is the input id that being targeted.

$("#animal").on('click', function(){
    var userVal = $("#animal-value").val(); // storing that value
    console.log(userVal); // logging the stored value to the console
    $("#animal-value").val('') // reseting it to empty
});
0

Here is very simple javascript. It works fine for me :

// JavaScript:

function sFocus (field) {
    if(field.value == 'Enter your search') {
        field.value = '';
    }
    field.className = "darkinput";
}

function sBlur (field) {
    if (field.value == '') {
        field.value = 'Enter your search';
        field.className = "lightinput";
    }
    else {
        field.className = "darkinput";
    }
}
// HTML
<form>
  <label class="screen-reader-text" for="s">Search for</label>
  <input
    type="text"
    class="lightinput"
    onfocus="sFocus(this)" 
    onblur="sBlur(this)"
    value="Enter your search" name="s" id="s"
  />
</form>
2
  • You should show how to hook it up too. The functions do nothing by themselves. Nov 17, 2011 at 15:10
  • <form role="search" method="get" id="searchform" action="" > <div><label class="screen-reader-text" for="s">Search for</label> <input type="text" class="lightinput" onfocus="sFocus(this)" onblur="sBlur(this)" value="Enter your search" name="s" id="s" /> <input type="submit" id="searchsubmit" value="" /> </div> </form>
    – ELO
    Nov 17, 2011 at 15:53

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