2

I want to mark a method as Obsolete, and also cause the compilation to fail if it is called from anywhere.

I came across a solution here How do I mark a method as Obsolete/Deprecated? .

an answer suggests this syntax, saying that the boolean modifier will achieve my wanted effect(failing compilation)

 [Obsolete("Method1 is deprecated, please use Method2 instead.", true)]

However, while this worked on the same project; it didn't when calling the method from another project (i even had visual studio productivity power tools show an eror for it but compilation still succeeded)

is this by design? or is there a workaround?

  • 1
    Read this SO thread. Simply turn on "Treat warnings as errors". – sszarek Apr 24 '15 at 9:19
  • 11
    If you want code that references this method to not compile, why have it in the first place? Delete it from your API. The [Obsolete] attribute is used to discourage (not forbid) users from using this method, while maintaing backwards compatibility. If that's not what you want, then Obsolete is not what you need. – dcastro Apr 24 '15 at 9:19
  • 1
    The use of obsolete methods will generate warnings. You could turn on warnings as errors on your projects for these specific warnings. – Kevin D Apr 24 '15 at 9:20
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    @dcastro i'm not sure that microsoft developers share your point of view, because the true boolean does just that (forbid the use), my problem is that it doesn't work between projects. ' why have it in the first place?' the problem is i know that code is obsolete, and i won't use it, but in two years another deveoper may be tempted to use it, and won't pay attention to a simple warning. – Souhaieb Besbes Apr 24 '15 at 9:57
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    Why not just make it private and mark it? – Tomer Apr 24 '15 at 10:00
2

If you use something marked as obsolete inside a method or class which is also marked as obsolete, the compiler will give you no warning or error.

Consider the following obsolete method in some class:

public class SomeClass
{
    [Obsolete("Don't use",true)]
    public static void ObsoleteMethod() { }
}

The expected behavior is that it yields a compiler error whenever it is used.

But if you use it in another obsolete method, you not even get a compiler warning.

public class AnotherClass
{
    public void Method()
    {
        SomeClass.ObsoleteMethod();  // Compiler error
    }

    [Obsolete("Avoid use",false)]
    public void AnotherObsoleteMethod()
    {
        SomeClass.ObsoleteMethod(); // No error and no warning
    }
}

This is true also if the whole class is marked as obsolete:

[Obsolete()]
public class ObsoleteClass
{
    public void Method()
    {
        SomeClass.ObsoleteMethod(); // No error
    }
}
  • After checking my code, i can confirm that was the situation i was facing. this explains why the attribute worked as expected when i tested it in dummy project. This makes me wonder why this kind of behaviour isn't documented anywhere, or is it? – Souhaieb Besbes Mar 10 '16 at 8:51
  • I didn't find anything about this, I stumbled across this some time ago while I was refactoring a library. – abto Mar 10 '16 at 18:44

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