Code snippet:

char str[] = "String1::String2:String3:String4::String5";
char *deli = "::";
char *token = strtok(str,deli);

while(token != NULL)
{
  printf("Token= \"%s\"\n", token);
  token=strtok(NULL,deli);
}

The above code snippet produces the output:

Token="String1"
Token="String2"
Token="String3"
Token="String4"
Token="String5"

but I want the output to be:

Token="String1"
Token="String2:String3:String4"
Token="String5"

I know that I am not getting the expected output because each character in the second argument of strtok is considered as a delimiter.

To get the expected output, I've written a program that uses strstr(and other things) to split the given string into tokens such that I get the expected output. Here is the program:

#include <stdbool.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int myStrtok(char* str,char* deli)
{
    if(str==NULL || deli==NULL)
        return -1;

    int tokens=0;
    char *token;
    char *output=str;


    while((token=strstr(output,deli))!=NULL)
    {

        bool print=true;

        if(output != token)
        {
            printf("Token = \"");
            tokens++;
            print=false;
        }

        while(output != token)
        {
            putchar(*output);
            output++;
        }

        if(print==false)
            printf("\"\n");
        output+=strlen(deli);
    }

    if(strlen(output)>0)
    {
        printf("Token = \"%s\"",output);
        tokens++;
    }
    printf("\n\n");
    return tokens;
}

int main(void)
{
    char str[]="One:1:Two::Three::::";
    char *deli="::";

    int retval;
    printf("Original string=\"%s\"\n\n",str);

    if((retval=myStrtok(str,deli))==-1)
        printf("The string or the delimeter is NULL\n");
    else
        printf("Number of tokens=%d\n", retval);
    return(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

The above program produces the expected output.

I'm wondering if there are any easier/simpler ways to do it. Are there any?

  • Do you want to keep the same style as strtok, multiple calls subsequently given NULL instead of delimiter? Or would you go with something returning an array? – Eregrith Apr 24 '15 at 12:49
  • I'd change the function prototype to have char const * deli. Also, it's supposed to return a char *, not an int. – EOF Apr 24 '15 at 12:50
  • Duplicate to stackoverflow.com/questions/7079694/… – Anshul Apr 24 '15 at 12:51
  • @Eregrith , I don't really care if the style has NULL as the first argument or not. The same goes with returning an array. – Cool Guy Apr 24 '15 at 12:51
  • @EOF , Good point. The declaration of deli in main can also be done the same way to avoid problems. – Cool Guy Apr 24 '15 at 12:52
up vote 3 down vote accepted

A string-delimiter function that uses strtok's prototype and mimicks its usage:

char *strtokm(char *str, const char *delim)
{
    static char *tok;
    static char *next;
    char *m;

    if (delim == NULL) return NULL;

    tok = (str) ? str : next;
    if (tok == NULL) return NULL;

    m = strstr(tok, delim);

    if (m) {
        next = m + strlen(delim);
        *m = '\0';
    } else {
        next = NULL;
    }

    return tok;
}
  • This produces an extra token when I have :: at the end or start of the string str – Cool Guy Apr 25 '15 at 12:13
  • Yes, that's by design. Empty tokens at the beginning, at the end or between delimiters are extracted. I admit that this isn't quite strtok's usage, but unlike strtok, this function can't match an arbitrary stretch of delimiters; it must match the delimiter exactly. (This behaviour is in acordance with how Python implements its split.) – M Oehm Apr 25 '15 at 13:32
  • You can ignore empty tokens by adding this before the return statement in the last line: if (m == tok || *tok == '\0') return strtokm(NULL, delim); – M Oehm Apr 25 '15 at 13:33

If you don't care about the same usage as strtok I would go with this:

// "String1::String2:String3:String4::String5" with delimiter "::" will produce
// "String1\0\0String2:String3:String4\0\0String5"
// And words should contain a pointer to the first S, the second S and the last S.
char **strToWordArray(char *str, const char *delimiter)
{
  char **words;
  int nwords = countWords(str, delimiter); //I let you decide how you want to do this
  words = malloc(sizeof(*words) * (nwords + 1));

  int w = 0;
  int len = strlen(delimiter);
  words[w++] = str;
  while (*str != NULL)
  {
    if (strncmp(str, delimiter, len) == 0)
    {
      for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
      {
        *(str++) = 0;
      }
      if (*str != 0)
        words[w++] = str;
      else
        str--; //Anticipate wrong str++ down;
    }
    str++;
  }
  words[w] = NULL;
  return words;
}
  • I get Warning: comparison with pointer and integer here: while (*str != NULL). Should I use while (*str != '\0') or while (*str)? And should countWords return the number of tokens or the number of words in str? What should it return in case of str being "String1::String2:String3:String4::String5"? – Cool Guy Apr 25 '15 at 12:40
  • Ah yes sorry it's indeed what you said. And countwords should return the number of "tokens", for your example it's 3 – Eregrith Apr 25 '15 at 12:57
  • Doesn't work :( – Cool Guy Apr 25 '15 at 14:13
  • 1
    @CoolGuy You tried with a string litteral which is readonly, and your printing loop misses an increment. – Eregrith Apr 26 '15 at 10:34
  • 1
    @CoolGuy You string needs to not be readonly for this method to work, as I told you. A string literal won't do it. Try using char *str = strdup("Sring1::String2:String3:String4::String5") – Eregrith Apr 26 '15 at 15:52

code derived from strsep https://code.woboq.org/userspace/glibc/string/strsep.c.html

char *strsepm( char **stringp, const char *delim ) {

    char *begin, *end;

    begin = *stringp;

    if  ( begin == NULL ) return NULL;

    /* Find the end of the token.  */
    end = strstr( begin , delim );

    if ( end != NULL ) {

        /* Terminate the token and set *STRINGP past NUL character.  */
        *end = '\0';

        end  += strlen( delim );

        *stringp = end;

    } else {

        /* No more delimiters; this is the last token.  */
        *stringp = NULL;  
    }

    return begin;
}

int main( int argc , char *argv [] ) {

    char            *token_ptr;
    char            *token;
    const char      *delimiter = "&&";

    char            buffer [ 256 ];

    strcpy( buffer , " && Hello && Bernd && waht's && going && on &&");

    token_ptr = buffer;

    while ( ( token = strsepm( &token_ptr , delimiter ) ) != NULL ) {

        printf( "\'%s\'\n" , token );

    }
}

Result:

' '   
' Hello '    
' Bernd '    
' waht's '    
' going '    
' on '    
''

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.