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I implemented a datetime.datetime to decimal year (year fraction) converter based on a previous answer. I am not getting the expected results but I can't find the bug.

from datetime import datetime, timedelta

def decimal_year_to_datetime(decimal_year_float):
    year = int(decimal_year_float)
    remain = decimal_year_float - year
    base = datetime(year, 1, 1)
    whole_year_time_delta = (base.replace(year=base.year + 1) - base)
    fractional_seconds = whole_year_time_delta.total_seconds() * remain
    our_time_delta = timedelta(seconds=fractional_seconds)
    result = base + our_time_delta
    return result

def test_conversion():
    year = 2013
    month = 1
    day = 1
    hour = 2
    minute = 16
    second = 48
    date = datetime(year=year, month=month, day=day)
    fraction_of_the_day = (hour + (minute + second / 60.0) / 60.0) / 24.
    days_in_year = (date.replace(year=date.year + 1) - date).days
    dec_yr = year + (date.timetuple().tm_yday + 
                     fraction_of_the_day) / float(days_in_year)

    expect_date = datetime(year=year, month=month, day=day, 
                              hour=hour, minute=minute, second=second)

    got_date = decimal_year_to_datetime(dec_yr)

    assert(got_date == expect_date)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    test_conversion()

I seem to be a day (an and a fraction of a second) off with my conversion. But I cannot see the bug.

Have I missed something obvious?

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    note: the accepted answer in the linked question may take into account changes in the local utc offset for whatever reasons otherwise you may introduce an hour error (e.g., 2014 year in Europe/Moscow timezone). It is rare and it introduces only ~1e-4 error -- see whether you can ignore it in your case. time.mktime() may reduce the error to ~6e-8 on some systems (if your input is known within a couple of seconds then it is enough). – jfs Apr 24 '15 at 20:07
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You're out by one day (a classic fencepost error!) because, although we consider 1st January to to be day one of the year, in computing terms that's the zeroth day. The simplest fix is to add in a - 1, but your approach seems generally quite complex; I would do it as follows:

def dt_to_dec(dt):
    """Convert a datetime to decimal year."""
    year_start = datetime(dt.year, 1, 1)
    year_end = year_start.replace(year=dt.year+1)
    return dt.year + ((dt - year_start).total_seconds() /  # seconds so far
        float((year_end - year_start).total_seconds()))  # seconds in year

In use:

>>> dec = dt_to_dec(datetime(2013, 1, 1, 2, 16, 48))
>>> dec
2013.0002602739726
>>> decimal_year_to_datetime(dec)
datetime.datetime(2013, 1, 1, 2, 16, 47, 999999)

(given floating point accuracy, that's as close as you're likely to get...)

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