1

I'm trying to format a select statement. The assignment specifies that it has to be formatted this way.

I have a database regarding a taxi service. I have to put together a view with the company name, passenger name, and taxi number. Easy. However, the output specifies that the company name should only appear once in the output, at the top of it's own group. So I have:

CREATE VIEW TAXITRIPS(COMPANYNAME, PASSENGERNAME, TAXI#) AS
(SELECT COMPANY.NAME, BOOKING.NAME, VEHICLES.TAXI#
FROM BOOKING JOIN VEHICLES ON BOOKING.TAXI# = VEHICLES.TAXI#
RIGHT OUTER JOIN COMPANY ON VEHICLES.NAME = COMPANY.NAME);

The right outer join is so that companies with no booking recorded are still displayed. If I now run:

SELECT * FROM TAXITRIPS ORDER BY COMPANYNAME ASC;

It will give me something like

COMPANYNAME          PASSENGERNAME      TAXI#
---------------------------------------------
ABC TAXIS            DAVE                192
LEGION CABS
PREMIER CABS         SHANE               2154
PREMIER CABS         TIM                 2169
SILVER SERVICE       DAVE                18579
SILVER SERVICE       TIM                 18124
SILVER SERVICE       AARON               18917

No result for legion cabs, all field displayed, et cetera. Assignment specification says it has to look like this.

COMPANYNAME          PASSENGERNAME      TAXI#
---------------------------------------------
ABC TAXIS            DAVE                192
LEGION CABS
PREMIER CABS         SHANE               2154
                     TIM                 2169
SILVER SERVICE       DAVE                18579
                     TIM                 18124
                     AARON               18917

The company name should only be displayed on its first row. DISTINCT is not helping. Any advice?

5
  • 2
    Why is your question tagged "SQL Server" but the title says "Oracle"? Apr 24 '15 at 15:43
  • Because I don't really know what I'm doing, if I'm honest.
    – ben
    Apr 24 '15 at 15:55
  • . . I am guessing that you are using Oracle. The software you are using should be in the tags. Apr 24 '15 at 16:02
  • If you are using SQL*Plus, it can handle this formatting requirement for you: docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14357/… Apr 24 '15 at 17:19
  • That's actually exactly what I needed. Break, so simple. Thank you.
    – ben
    Apr 25 '15 at 0:29
6

Normally, you would do this at the application layer, because the result set relies on the ordering of the rows -- a bad thing in SQL.

But you can do it as:

SELECT (CASE WHEN ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY c.NAME ORDER BY v.TAXI#) = 1
             THEN c.NAME
        END) as CompanyName, b.NAME, v.TAXI#
FROM COMPANY c LEFT JOIN
     VEHICLES v
     ON v.NAME = c.NAME LEFT JOIN
     BOOKING b 
     ON b.TAXI# = v.FLIGHT#
ORDER BY c.name, v.taxi#;

Note: I rearranged the joins to be LEFT JOINs. Most people find that easier to follow than RIGHT JOINs.

4
  • Dang another powerful use of over partition by, row num and a case statement. But I agree... normally done in application layer. +1
    – xQbert
    Apr 24 '15 at 16:06
  • 1
    This query ought to have an order by, as there's a chance that maybe the rows won't be displayed in the expected order.
    – Boneist
    Apr 24 '15 at 16:09
  • @Boneist . . . I really do not know if Oracle pays attention to order by in a view. In general, when using views, the advice is to do the ordering in the query referencing the view. As an example, order by is explicitly not permitted in SQL Server views unless the view also includes top and not required by ANSI. Apr 24 '15 at 19:35
  • 1
    Having done a quick test by creating a view that contains an order by, and then selecting from that view, I can say that Oracle very much does pay attention to the order by. At least, that's what the SORT ORDER BY step in the execution path tells me...
    – Boneist
    Apr 30 '15 at 14:20

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