15

I have the following problem taken from Codility's code testing exercises:

A zero-indexed array A consisting of N different integers is given. The array contains integers in the range [1..(N + 1)], which means that exactly one element is missing.

Your goal is to find that missing element.

Write a function:

class Solution { public int solution(int[] A); }

that, given a zero-indexed array A, returns the value of the missing element.

For example, given array A such that:

A[0] = 2 A[1] = 3 A[2] = 1 A[3] = 5

the function should return 4, as it is the missing element.

Assume that:

N is an integer within the range [0..100,000]; the elements of A are all distinct; each element of array A is an integer within the range [1..(N + 1)].

Complexity:

expected worst-case time complexity is O(N); expected worst-case space complexity is O(1), beyond input storage (not >counting the storage required for input arguments).

Elements of input arrays can be modified.


My approach was to convert the given array into an ArrayList, use the ArrayList to find the lowest and highest values inside the array, and iterate through all possible values from lowest to highest, and then return the missing value.

This solves the example problem, but my problem seems to be that I cannot get right answers under the following conditions of the given array:

"empty list and single element"

"the first or the last element is missing"

"single element"

"two elements"

What am I doing wrong, and what is the proper way to go about solving this problem?

1
  • What you're missing is that it's not a programming problem, it's a math problem. It doesn't really have any reasonable place in a set of programming questions. Commented Nov 10, 2020 at 1:39

33 Answers 33

60

This problem has a mathematical solution, based on the fact that the sum of consecutive integers from 1 to n is equal to n(n+1)/2.

Using this formula we can calculate the sum from 1 to N+1. Then with O(N) time complexity we calculate the actual sum of all elements in the array.

The difference between the full and actual totals will yield the value of the missing element.

Space complexity is O(1).

8
  • 5
    Thank you. This answer passes all test cases and conditions, and frankly I never would have figured this one out on my own. Commented Apr 26, 2015 at 18:53
  • Thank you, so elementary yet very neat solution. I too would have never figured it out myself
    – amira
    Commented Mar 6, 2020 at 10:05
  • Does anyone has implemented this in Python?
    – GPopat
    Commented Apr 27, 2020 at 11:59
  • @GaurangPopat See stackoverflow.com/a/54717605/2055998
    – PM 77-1
    Commented Apr 27, 2020 at 13:24
  • Its not working for A = [12, 13, 1]. Am I missing anything?
    – GPopat
    Commented Apr 27, 2020 at 13:34
10

This problem is part of the Lessons of Time Complexity.

https://codility.com/media/train/1-TimeComplexity.pdf

In fact at the end there is the explanation on how to compute the sum of the elements in an array, without do any loop.

This is the final solution in Python3:

def solution(A):

    n = len(A)+1
    result = n * (n + 1)//2

    return result - sum(A)
5
  • Its not working for input A = [12, 13, 1], am I missing anything?
    – GPopat
    Commented Apr 27, 2020 at 13:34
  • 1
    @GaurangPopat It cannot work with your array, because here we are solving this problem: Go to Page "4" of this document: [link] (codility.com/media/train/1-TimeComplexity.pdf) The array must have all the elements . I explain: [1,2,3,5,6,7,8,4] This array contains 8 elements, and has all the numbers from 1 to 8. Your array [12,13,1] contains 3 elements, so it must be: [1,2,3] OR, [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13] to be a complete array.
    – RobyB
    Commented Apr 29, 2020 at 14:35
  • @GaurangPopat Remember that the goal here is to find the missing element of the Array (See the Title: PermMissingElement) -> missing element. I hope everything will be clear now :)
    – RobyB
    Commented Apr 29, 2020 at 14:39
  • Indeed! {12,13,1} is not valid input. Thanks!
    – GPopat
    Commented Apr 30, 2020 at 15:09
  • The question should have been written in simple way but question itself is very difficult to understand.
    – VGupta
    Commented Dec 24, 2021 at 0:47
7

The problem statement clearly specifies that the array will consist of "N different integers", thus N must be at least 2. N=0 and N=1 simply do not make sense if we write them in English, e.g. "An array consisting of 0 different integers...".

A zero-indexed array A consisting of N different integers is given. The array contains integers in the range [1..(N + 1)], which means that exactly one element is missing.

With these initial conditions and stated assumptions, tests like "single element", "empty list", etc., are completely inappropriate.

Proper production code would most likely have to test for invalid conditions, but that wasn't a stated goal of the challenge.

4
  • I told myself exactly the same thing when I saw it...
    – Kénium
    Commented May 4, 2021 at 3:03
  • If the array has zero elements, then clearly the number 1 is missing.
    – Chris J
    Commented Jul 13, 2021 at 2:33
  • Exactly!!! Ridiculous fails
    – Ceren
    Commented Mar 1, 2022 at 15:37
  • Or, when the first or the last element is the missing one -_-
    – AKoch
    Commented Apr 24, 2022 at 14:15
5

my solution in java 100% Detected time complexity: O(N)

import java.util.*;

class Solution {
public int solution(int[] arr) {

    if(arr.length == 0) return 1;

    int sumArr = 0;


    for(int i=0; i < arr.length; i++){

        sumArr = sumArr + arr[i];

    }


    int sumN = 0;

     for(int i=1; i <= arr.length+1; i++){

        sumN = sumN + i;

    }


    if(sumArr == sumN)  return arr.length;


    return  sumN - sumArr;
}

}

4

Another 100% solution:

There is actually not even a need to use 64-bit integers to avoid the overflows that a couple of tests try to trigger (the ones with array size of 100000 at the time of writing). And you can get away with only one sum variable. The last line avoids overflows further by implementing n(n+1)/2 differently so that the division by two occurs "early":

C#: class Solution { public int solution(int[] A) { var sum = 0; for(int i = 0; i < A.Length; i++) sum += A[i];
return A.Length % 2 == 0 ? -sum + (A.Length/2 + 1) * (A.Length+1) : -sum + (A.Length/2 + 1) * (A.Length+2); } }

1
  • If you're worried about overflows, you can also use xor instead of summation. Commented Jul 18, 2019 at 0:44
4

You can use an Array to sort the element first and then use simple for loop to iterate over it, and find the missing value. Here is my simple code with detected time complexity of O(N) or O(N * log(N)) in codility.

public static int solution(int[] A) {

    int size = A.length;
    int count = 1;

    Arrays.sort(A);

    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        if (A[i] != count)
            return count;
        count++;
    }
    return count;
}
3

java solution:

public int solution(int[] A) {
    int nExpected = A.length + 1;
    long seriesSumExpected = nExpected * (nExpected + 1L) / 2;
    long seriesSum = getSum(A);
    return (int) (seriesSumExpected - seriesSum);
}

private long getSum(int[] A) {
    long sum = 0L;
    for (int i : A) {
        sum += i;
    }
    return sum;
}

Task Score: 100%
Correctness: 100%
Performance: 100%

2

Here is the solution in PHP using the sum of consecutive integers from 1 to n is equal to n(n+1)/2.

function solution($A) {

    $size = count($A) + 1;
    $total = ($size * ($size + 1)) / 2;

    return  $total - array_sum($A);

}
2

Here's another solution using JavaScript tested 100%.

function solution(A) {
    let maximumNumber = A.length + 1;
    let totalSum = (maximumNumber*(maximumNumber + 1))/2;
    let partialSum = 0;
    for(let i=0; i<A.length; i++) {
        partialSum += A[i];
    }
    return totalSum - partialSum;
}
1
private static int getMissingElementInArrayNew(int[] A) throws IOException {
        double n =  A.length + 1;
        double totalSum = (double) ((n * (n + 1)) / 2);

        for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
            totalSum -= A[i];
        }

        return (int) (totalSum == 0 ? A.length + 1 : totalSum); 
    }
1
  • Let us take example: int[] a = {1,2,4,5}; Here number 3 is missing. So the actual array should be {1,2,3,4,5}; Missing Number = Sum of the Expected Array - Sum of Actual Array; = SUM {1,2,3,4,5} - SUM{1,2,4,5} SUM {1,2,3,4,5} = N (N +1) / 2; (5 * 6) = 15 SUM{1,2,4,5} = 12 Missing Number = 15 - 12 = 3 Commented Feb 6, 2018 at 9:17
1

Golang solution:

func Solution(A []int) int {
  n := len(A) + 1
  total := n * (n + 1) /2
  for _, e := range A {
    total -= e
  }
  return total
}
1
Java solution got 100%:


public int solution(int[] A) {
    
    Arrays.sort(A);
    
    if (A.length == 0) {
        return 1;
    }

    if (A[0] != 1) {
        return 1;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
        if (A[i] != i + 1) {
            return A[i] - 1;
        }
    }

    return A[A.length - 1] + 1;
}
0

While I value the math solution it's not that easy to understand.
So here's a simple solution with 100% score on codility.

import java.util.*;

public int solution(int[] A) {
    int missing = 1; // missing number 1 already
    Arrays.sort(A);

    // check numbers one by one
    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
        if (A[i] == missing) {    // we found the missing number !
            missing = A[i]+1;    // add +1 and keep checking
        }
    }
    return missing;
}
3
  • 1
    got only 10 percent with this ...this is dead wrong and doesn't contemplate several edge cases laike missing first and last N+1 element
    – John
    Commented Oct 2, 2018 at 5:52
  • Actually, this solution scores 100%. It's simple and non-mathematical.
    – treaz
    Commented Sep 24, 2019 at 18:31
  • This is far from ideal. They are requesting time_efficiency, afterall... Sorting usually is a O{nlogn} or O{nˆ2} affair (I'm not a Java guy, I don't know what's under the hood of that Arrays.sort(A) voodoo)... The mathematical way gets the job done in O{n}. Commented Nov 19, 2019 at 23:19
0

OBJECTIVE-C SOLUTION O(N) - SET Approach

Results given by Codility

Task Score: 100%
Correctness: 100%
Performance: 100%

Time Complexity

The worst case time complexity is O(N) or O(N * log(N))

Xcode Solution Here

+(int)SETSolution:(NSMutableArray*)array {

    /******** Algorithm Explanation  ********/

    // FACTS
    //      Use of a NSSet to verify if the missing element exist or not.
    //      Edge case: when the array is empty [], we should return 1

    // STEP 1
    //     validate the edge case

    // STEP 2
    //      Generate a NSSet with the array elements in order to search an element faster

    // STEP 3
    //      Use a for loop and find the current 'i' in the NSSset
    //      If an elements doesn't exist in the NSSet, that means it's the missing element.

    int n = (int)[array count];
    int missing = 0;
    // STEP 1
    if (n == 0) {
        missing = 1;
        return missing;
    }
    else {
        // STEP 2
        NSSet *elements = [NSSet setWithArray:array];

        // STEP 3
        for (int i = 1; i <= (n+1); i++) {
            // O(N) or O(N * log(N)) depending of  required iterations
            if (![elements containsObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:i]]) {
                missing = i;
                return missing;
            }
        }
        return  missing;
    }
}
0

OBJECTIVE-C SOLUTION O(N) - XOR Approach

Results given by Codility

Task Score: 100%
Correctness: 100%
Performance: 100%

Time Complexity

The worst case time complexity is O(N) or O(N * log(N))

Xcode Solution Here

+(int)XORSolution:(NSMutableArray*)array {

    /******** Algorithm Explanation  ********/

    // FACTS
    //      Use of XOR operator
    //      Edge case: when the array is empty [], we should return 1
    //      XOR of a number with itself is 0.
    //      XOR of a number with 0 is number itself.


    // STEP 1
    //       XOR all the array elements, let the result of XOR be X1.
    // STEP 2
    //       XOR all numbers from 1 to n, let XOR be X2.
    // STEP 3
    //       XOR of X1 and X2 gives the missing number.

    int n = (int)[array count];

    // Edge Case
    if(n==0){
        return 1;
    }
    else {

        // STEP 1
        /* XOR of all the elements in array */
        int x1 = 0;
        for (int i=0; i<n; i++){
            x1 = x1 ^ [[array objectAtIndex:i]intValue];
        }

        // STEP 2
        /* XOR of all the elements from 1 to n+1 */
        int x2 = 0;
        for (int i=1; i<=(n+1); i++){
            x2 = x2 ^ i;
        }

        // STEP 3
        int missingElement = x1 ^ x2;
        return missingElement;
    }
}
0

100% solution in Swift 4:

public func solution(_ A : inout [Int]) -> Int {
    // first we simply calculate the sum on the given array
    var sum = 0
    for element in A {
        sum += element
    }

    // as the sum of consecutive ints is given by n(n+1)/2,
    // we calculate the expected sum from 1 to n + 1
    // (which is ((n+1)(n+2))/2) and substract the actual sum
    // to get the missing element
    return ((A.count + 1) * (A.count + 2) / 2) - sum
}
0
// Solution with LinQ.
// Task Score: 100%
// Correctness: 100%
// Performance: 100%

using System.Linq;
public static int GetPermMissingElem(int[] A)
        {
            if (A.Length <= 0)
                return 1;

            int size = A.Length;
            System.Collections.Generic.List<int> missing = Enumerable.Range(1, A[size - 1]).Except(A.ToList()).ToList();
            if (!missing.Any())
                return A[size -1] + 1;

            return missing.First();
        }
2
  • Could you please explain why and how this code provides an answer to the question? Just a few sentences might be sufficient. Thanks.
    – deHaar
    Commented Jul 9, 2019 at 17:57
  • public static int GetPermMissingElem(int[] A) { if (A.length == 0) return 1; int sumOfAllNumbers = 0; for (int num : A) sumOfAllNumbers += num; long N = A.length; long expectedSumOfAllNumbers = ((N + 1) * (N + 2)) / 2; long missingNumber = expectedSumOfAllNumbers - sumOfAllNumbers; return (int)missingNumber; } Commented Jul 10, 2019 at 18:21
0

This got 100% on Codality. It uses very basic math. For the array: {2,3,1,5} 1,2,3,4,?

  1. sum of all the indexes + 1 and plus the missing index + 1 to get what you total should be.
  2. Then you can subtract the sum of the array: (1+2+3+4+5=15)-(2+3+1+5=11)=4
    public int solution(int A[]) {

        if (A == null) return 0;
        if(A.length == 0) return 1;

        int total = 0;
        int max = A.length + 1;
        for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
            total += A[i];
            max += i + 1;
        }

        return (max - total) < 0 ? 0 : (max - total);
    }

This is one thing I had to look up though which irritates me and I don't understand. if(A.length == 0) return 1; This makes IMO no sense. If the array length is zero then it should be zero IMO.

0

I used this java code as a solution. Got 100%

class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {
        int result = 0;
        Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<>();
        for (int x : A) {
            set.add(x);
        }
        for (int x = 1; x < set.size() + 2; x++) {
            if (!set.contains(x)) {
                return x;
            }
        }
        return result;
    }

}
0

Ruby, 100% pass :

def solution(a)
  n = a.length + 1
  sum = n * (n + 1)/2
  return sum - a.inject(0,:+)
end
0

I have trouble with this, but only because i did not understand all cases. this is my solution in Java. Bit longer (i could not make it small) but score is 100%.

class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {
        Arrays.sort(A);
        if (A.length == 1) {
            if (A[0] == 1) {
                return A.length + 1;
            } else {
                return A[0] - 1;
            }
        }
        for (int n = 0; n < A.length - 1; n++) {
            if (A.length == 2) {
                if (A[n] == 1) {
                    if (A[n] + 1 != A[n + 1]) {
                        return A[n] + 1;
                    }
                    return A.length + 1;
                } else {
                    return 1;
                }
            } else {
                if (A[0] != 1) {
                    return 1;
                }
                if (A[n] + 1 != A[n + 1]) {
                    return A[n] + 1;
                }
            }
        }
        return A.length + 1;
    }
}

Analysis summary The solution obtained perfect score.

Kind regards Nenad

0
    using System;
// you can also use other imports, for example:
// using System.Collections.Generic;

// you can write to stdout for debugging purposes, e.g.
// Console.WriteLine("this is a debug message");

class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {
        // write your code in C# 6.0 with .NET 4.5 (Mono)
        int i, j = 0, n = A.Length;
            if (A != null && n != 0)
            {
                Array.Sort(A);
                for (j = A[0], i = 0; i < n; i++, j++)
                {
                    if (j == A[i]) continue;
                    else return j;
                }

                if (i == n) return (A[0] == 2) ? 1 : ++A[--n];

            }
            else return 1;
            return -1;
    }
}
0

Swift solution 100% pass

import Foundation
import Glibc

public func solution(_ A : inout [Int]) -> Int {

  let sortedArray = A.sorted(by: { $0 < $1 })

  for i in 0..<sortedArray.count {
      if sortedArray[i] != i+1 {
          return i+1
      }    
  }

  return A.count + 1
}
0

Java Solution:

// Import Dependencies
import java.util.*;


class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {
        // write your code in Java SE 8
        long N = A.length+1;
        long realSum = N*(N+1)/2;
        
        long foundSum = 0;
        for(int i=0;i<N-1;i++){
            foundSum = foundSum + A[i];
        }
        long answer = (realSum - foundSum);
        
        return (int)(answer);
    }
}
0

Here is my solution.

const assert = require("assert").strict;

function solution(A) {
    const n = A.length + 1;
    const sum = (n * (n + 1)) / 2;
    const sum2 = A.reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0);
    return sum - sum2;
}


assert.strictEqual(solution([2, 3, 1, 5]), 4);
assert.strictEqual(solution([]), 1);
assert.strictEqual(solution([1]), 2);
0

Attaching solution written in kotlin:

fun solution(A: IntArray): Int {
        val lastElement = A.size + 1
        // including missing element
        val arraySize = A.size + 1L
        var result = (arraySize * (1 + lastElement)) / 2
        A.forEach {
            result -= it
        }
        return result.toInt()
    }

P.S. Arithmetic progression sum formula was used.

P.P.S. Perform operations using Long primitive type, as you can face some Int limits.

0

I think the best way of doing it is via XOR which is clean, elegant and fast. No math knowledge required, just CS! This has also another advantage over the other way of summing it up where we won't get an integer overflow since we are just doing bitwise operations.

O(n) in time, O(1) in space.

This is how the code looks like (Javascript), just a single loop required:

function solution(A) {
    // write your code in JavaScript (Node.js 8.9.4)

    let missingNumber = A.length + 1;
    // Sum up 1+2+3+...+N+(N+1) AND all of A[i] (except value not present in A[i] obviously). The value not present in A[i] is the odd one out. Note `missingNumber` starts with `A.length + 1` (i.e. N+1) because we loop N times here only...
    for(let i = 0; i < A.length; ++i) {
       missingNumber ^= (i + 1) ^ A[i];
    }
    
    return missingNumber;
}

https://florian.github.io/xor-trick/ has a good guide to understanding XORs.

Basically taking the idea where X ^ X equals 0, we use this to take advantage of duplicate values that cancels out the values so we get the non-duplicated value out (i.e. the missing element left).

This works because the question constraints guarantees the elements of A are all distinct. So we can just XOR them up together to take advantage of this trick. If this is a permutation where elements can be duplicated, this does not work, i.e. PermCheck

0

My solution tries to half the time of the summation. Detected time complexity: O(N) or O(N * log(N))

`

    int sumArray = 0;
    int t = A.length-1;
    for (int i=0; i<= t-i; i++) {
        if(i == t-i){
            sumArray += A[i];
            break;
        }
        sumArray += (A[i] + A[t-i]);
    }
    int n = (A.length + 1);
    int total = BigDecimal.valueOf(n).pow(2).add(BigDecimal.valueOf(n)).divide(BigDecimal.valueOf(2)).intValue();
    return total - sumArray;
`
0

I just tried this solution which has no sorting and just sticks to the basics, got 100% result

public int solution100percent(int[] A) {

    if (A.length == 0)
        return 1;

    int arrayCount = 0;
    int iCount = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
        arrayCount += A[i];
        iCount += i;
    }
    return iCount + A.length + (A.length + 1) - arrayCount;
}
0

Although knowing the total sum of consecutive integers would help get a fast solution , a fast but not memory efficient solution is possible using additional array and 2O(N) complexity without calculating the sum..

here is my solution:

class Solution {
    
    public int findFalse(boolean [] ar){
        
        for (int j = 0; j<ar.length; ++j){
            if(ar[j]==false){
                return j;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }

    public int solution(int[] A) {
        // write your code in Java SE 8
        
        boolean [] M = new boolean[A.length+1];
        
        for (int i:A){
            M[i-1] = true;   
        }
        
        int missingValue = findFalse(M) +1 ;
        return missingValue;
        
    }
}

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