15

I have been writing Java for almost a year now, and I have seen 2 different conventions for how people implement their setters.

To Illustrate this, here are examples of both conventions. (I would love also to know concise names of these two patters)

Classes using first convention, return nothing from their 'set' methods. Like so:

public class Classic{
    private double _x;
    private double _y;
    public Classic(){
        x = 0;
        y = 0;
    }
    public void setX(double d){//or boolean with a type check on input
        x = d;
    }
    public void sety(double d){
        y = d;
    }
}

Classes using the alternative convention return themselves from their setter methods. Like so:

public class Alternative{
    private double _x;
    private double _y;
    public Alternative(){
        x = 0;
        y = 0;
    }
    public Alternative setX(double d){
        x = d;
        return(this);
    }
    public Alternative sety(double d){
        y = d;
        return(this);
    }
}

The difference being that with the alternative approach syntax such as

Alternative NewAlt(double x,double y){
     return(new Alternative()
                .setX(x)
                .setY(y));
}

Is possible while with the classic set-up the same factory method would look like this.

Classic NewAlt(double x,double y){
     Classic temp = new Classic();
     temp.setX(x);
     temp.setY(x);
     return(temp);
}

It is debatable which of these is more readable/usable.

My question is about the performance difference between these two patterns. Does it exist? If so how big is the difference, and where does it arise from?

If there is no performance difference, which one is considered 'better practice'?

8
  • 1
    Ain't no "self" in java.
    – user180100
    Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:25
  • 3
    @AniketThakur Sure? Why is this case called Builder pattern if there is no builder used? As far as I know, it's "just" a "Fluent API".
    – Tom
    Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:30
  • 1
    @kpie When you tag a question as Java, please make sure it compiles using the standard java compiler. You've been here for a while. You know the drill. This is way too lazy on your part.. Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:30
  • 1
    Its not the builder pattern but more of a Fluent API like Tom says.
    – Vahx
    Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:31
  • 1
    @kpie temp = new Classic(); What's temp? I agree this is a minor flaw that can be ignored but there were other errors in your code too before others pointed them out.. Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:44

4 Answers 4

18

Method chaining may look nice in some situations, but I would not overuse it. It does get used a lot in the builder pattern, as mentioned in another comment. To some degree it's probably a matter of personal preference.

One disadvantage of method chaining in my opinion is with debugging and breakpoints. It may be tricky to step through code filled with chained methods - but this may also depend on the IDE. I find the ability to debug absolutely crucial, so I generally avoid patterns and snippets that could make my life harder when debugging.

7
  • 7
    +1 for writing code that is easy to debug, but if you have to put a breakpoint on a setter you are already in trouble ;-) Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:39
  • Hehe I totally agree. I was covering method chaining in general. With setters it is probably just a matter of personal preference. I don't normally use them outside the builder pattern or similar.
    – async
    Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:42
  • I appreciate the answer and +1 for "method chaining" But I am really looking for a definitive answer about performance.
    – kpie
    Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:43
  • 1
    Or maybe you're just curious... :)
    – async
    Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:45
  • 3
    Returning something carries one more instruction (or a few extra instructions) than not returning anything, so the return this is marginally slower - if you can call it like that. The JVM specification covers how it works in great detail. Unfortunately I don't remember very precisely so please take it with a pinch of salt.
    – async
    Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:48
3

The variant you're using in class Alternative is something I know from the 'Builder pattern'. There, the task is to build some specific object similar to builder.setX().setY().build().

Personally, I'd use the Classic variant whenever there's no specific use for the Alternative variant.

(As a side note, I would not use brackets for return)

3
  • 3
    The task of the Builder pattern is not to build some specific object but to ensure that the entire operation of creating an object happens in one go, thus leaving no room for any inconsistent state. Just like constructors, it ensure that the object is initialized with the required values before others can have a go with it. Unlike constructors, it makes the code more readable specially in the case of a large number of parameters. Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:34
  • @bot "Just like constructors", or like a factory method :D.
    – Tom
    Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:37
  • 2
    @Tom Sure, but a factory method may not necessarily create an object (it can return a reference to an existing cached object initialized by the constructor or another factory method.. we would never know :P) Commented Apr 25, 2015 at 18:39
1

A setter in Java is most often linked to the concept of JavaBeans, even though we now use this concept without calling it like that, but it really often used without being explicitly named like that, sometimes people call them entities (even without the ORM context).

A JavaBean has properties and those properties are the combination of a private field and (a setter and/or a getter).

There is nothing to say about those setters and getters except that they should be as simple as possible. In that regards, the most simple implementation of a setter is the void one: just set the value and exit.

If you look at what any IDE does, the default implementation for a setter is the void one.

In that regards, I would alway go the void-way for value objects (wether they're called JavaBeans, Entity, Dto, etc.) and never use the chaining-way. You ask about best practice, the void-way is the best practice for value objects.

For tools, like builders, dsl, services, streams I might use the chaining only if it really is meaningful and adds something and is not too cumbersome.

My short advice is use void for value objects and do whatever you want for the rest. Have fun designing your classes. ;)

0

It cannot be said, what option has the better performance. Some people may think, that the alternative, which I normally call fluent interface (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluent_interface) has the worse performance, because the this-pointer must be returned again and again. But this is pure speculation.

A general answer cannot be given.

  • The overhead of a function or method call is relatively high. Returning one single pointer is only a neglectable part of this.
  • Java does optimisations not only at compile time. There are techniques that for example remove variables or inline function or method calls at runtime (compare also Are there inline functions in java?).
  • If performance really matters, the author of the code needs to run a profiler on exactly his example. And if this really identifies bottle necks, it could be worth to consider specialised functions (e.g. set x and y both in only one method) or going completely without setter functions.
  • If specialised mechanisms are needed in some parts of the program, it would be inappropriate to use these mechanisms also everwhere alse. The question if this special format of methods is appropriate or not is in general not a question of the execution performance.
  • In the example it is not clear, what the benefit of setx and sety could be. Before giving an answer this would be important to know. It looks like these methods could be eliminated when the member variables are made public. This of course is the most performant solution.
  • Without having these points clear, the question looks more like an instance of this discussion: https://wiki.c2.com/?PrematureOptimization

Without giving an answer, what is "better" practice, I think, everybody agrees that the void version is the most common practice. Normally it is a good advice to also follow the common practice (https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principle_of_Least_Surprise). But as usual this does not mean, that this is actually the best practice. Returning the this-pointer does not hurt anybody and is useful in a few situations.

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