118

I've done most of my research on this on BabelJS and on MDN (which has no information at all), but please feel free to tell me if I have not been careful enough in looking around for more information about the ES6 Spec.

I'm wondering whether or not ES6 supports multiple inheritance in the same fashion as other duck-typed languages do. For instance, can I do something like:

class Example extends ClassOne, ClassTwo {
    constructor() {
    }
}

to extend multiple classes on to the new class? If so, will the interpreter prefer methods/properties from ClassTwo over ClassOne?

  • 4
    This isn't really possible with the current way inheritance works in js, the closest you can do is a mixin – qwertymk Apr 26 '15 at 15:05
  • Can you provide some kind of reference which states that this is not possible in the new spec, and if so, can you make it an answer so I can accept it? – BTC Apr 26 '15 at 15:06
  • I read the new ES6 classes don't add any new functionality, they are just syntax sugar. – Oriol Apr 26 '15 at 15:13
  • 1
  • @Oriol, they are syntax sugar, but I had wondered if that sugar was doing something with multiple classes internally. – BTC Apr 26 '15 at 15:40

16 Answers 16

64

An object can only have one prototype. Inheriting from two classes can be done by creating a parent object as a combination of two parent prototypes.

The syntax for subclassing makes it possible to do that in the declaration, since the right-hand side of the extends clause can be any expression. Thus, you can write a function that combines prototypes according to whatever criteria you like, and call that function in the class declaration.

  • 1
    I was always wondered, is there any way to set a getter on the __proto__ link to forward the prop lookup to the correct object? I've tried but haven't ever gotten it to work – qwertymk Apr 26 '15 at 15:13
  • 2
    @qwertymk well keep in mind that __proto__ itself is a deprecated feature. It reflects the internal prototype link, but it's not really the internal prototype link. – Pointy Apr 26 '15 at 15:15
  • so never any chance of any hack like that ever working? core-js did something similar with weakmap support using getters. Multiple inheritance would be very cool – qwertymk Apr 26 '15 at 15:18
  • 1
    @qwertymk well I can't say with authority whether it's definitely impossible. Personally I use inheritance in JavaScript very, very rarely. In fact I use prototypes pretty rarely, for that matter. – Pointy Apr 26 '15 at 15:25
  • 2
    Here's the solution I came up with: esdiscuss.org/topic/symbol-for-modifying-property-lookup. Sample: class Foo extends new MultiClass(Bar, Baz, One, Two) { ... }. The methods and properties of the last constructor passed to new MultiClass have highest precedence, they're just mixed into the new prototype. I think an even better solution exists if re-implemented using ES6 Proxies, but there's not enough native support for it yet. – trusktr Jul 13 '16 at 9:04
68

Check my example bellow, super method working as expected. Using a few tricks even instanceof works (most of the time):

// base class
class A {  
  foo() {
    console.log(`from A -> inside instance of A: ${this instanceof A}`);
  }
}

// B mixin, will need a wrapper over it to be used
const B = (B) => class extends B {
  foo() {
    if (super.foo) super.foo(); // mixins don't know who is super, guard against not having the method
    console.log(`from B -> inside instance of B: ${this instanceof B}`);
  }
};

// C mixin, will need a wrapper over it to be used
const C = (C) => class extends C {
  foo() {
    if (super.foo) super.foo(); // mixins don't know who is super, guard against not having the method
    console.log(`from C -> inside instance of C: ${this instanceof C}`);
  }
};

// D class, extends A, B and C, preserving composition and super method
class D extends C(B(A)) {  
  foo() {
    super.foo();
    console.log(`from D -> inside instance of D: ${this instanceof D}`);
  }
}

// E class, extends A and C
class E extends C(A) {
  foo() {
    super.foo();
    console.log(`from E -> inside instance of E: ${this instanceof E}`);
  }
}

// F class, extends B only
class F extends B(Object) {
  foo() {
    super.foo();
    console.log(`from F -> inside instance of F: ${this instanceof F}`);
  }
}

// G class, C wrap to be used with new decorator, pretty format
class G extends C(Object) {}

const inst1 = new D(),
      inst2 = new E(),
      inst3 = new F(),
      inst4 = new G(),
      inst5 = new (B(Object)); // instance only B, ugly format

console.log(`Test D: extends A, B, C -> outside instance of D: ${inst1 instanceof D}`);
inst1.foo();
console.log('-');
console.log(`Test E: extends A, C -> outside instance of E: ${inst2 instanceof E}`);
inst2.foo();
console.log('-');
console.log(`Test F: extends B -> outside instance of F: ${inst3 instanceof F}`);
inst3.foo();
console.log('-');
console.log(`Test G: wraper to use C alone with "new" decorator, pretty format -> outside instance of G: ${inst4 instanceof G}`);
inst4.foo();
console.log('-');
console.log(`Test B alone, ugly format "new (B(Object))" -> outside instance of B: ${inst5 instanceof B}, this one fails`);
inst5.foo();

Will print out

Test D: extends A, B, C -> outside instance of D: true
from A -> inside instance of A: true
from B -> inside instance of B: true
from C -> inside instance of C: true
from D -> inside instance of D: true
-
Test E: extends A, C -> outside instance of E: true
from A -> inside instance of A: true
from C -> inside instance of C: true
from E -> inside instance of E: true
-
Test F: extends B -> outside instance of F: true
from B -> inside instance of B: true
from F -> inside instance of F: true
-
Test G: wraper to use C alone with "new" decorator, pretty format -> outside instance of G: true
from C -> inside instance of C: true
-
Test B alone, ugly format "new (B(Object))" -> outside instance of B: false, this one fails
from B -> inside instance of B: true

Link to fiddle around

  • 1
    You can fix that "ugly format" of B(Object) by making B extend (B||Object). – Aaron Jun 7 '17 at 19:06
  • @Aaron i'm not really sure i'm following you on this one (or you are following me). If F extends (B||Object) instead of F extends B(Object), it will extend the B mixin as it it (as a function) so F will only extend the default Function prototype since B was never executed. By using F extends B(Object) we are actually executing B function and F will extend 'whatever' B function returns, in this case it's the B class defined inside the B function ... small hack to keep the class naming right. – Poelinca Dorin Jun 8 '17 at 10:34
  • @Aaron what we could do is use function default params const B = (B = Object) => class extends B { and then use class F extends B() { for a prettier usage, but uglier hack Kappa – Poelinca Dorin Jun 8 '17 at 10:37
  • const B = (B) => class extends (B||Object) { would let you replace inst5 = new (B(Object)); // instance only B, ugly format with inst5 = new (B());, or perhaps I misunderstand the context... – Aaron Jun 13 '17 at 0:25
  • @Aaron yes that would work just fine until console.log('from B -> inside instance of B: ${this instanceof B}'); witch will fail as Right-hand side of 'instanceof' is not an object. Using const B = (B = Object) => class extends B { as previously mentioned will pass the instanceof test and provides you with the inst5 = new (B()); usage as well if you wish so. – Poelinca Dorin Jun 14 '17 at 12:51
19

Sergio Carneiro's and Jon's implementation requires you to define an initializer function for all but one class. Here is a modified version of the aggregation function, which makes use of default parameters in the constructors instead. Included are also some comments by me.

var aggregation = (baseClass, ...mixins) => {
    class base extends baseClass {
        constructor (...args) {
            super(...args);
            mixins.forEach((mixin) => {
                copyProps(this,(new mixin));
            });
        }
    }
    let copyProps = (target, source) => {  // this function copies all properties and symbols, filtering out some special ones
        Object.getOwnPropertyNames(source)
              .concat(Object.getOwnPropertySymbols(source))
              .forEach((prop) => {
                 if (!prop.match(/^(?:constructor|prototype|arguments|caller|name|bind|call|apply|toString|length)$/))
                    Object.defineProperty(target, prop, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(source, prop));
               })
    }
    mixins.forEach((mixin) => { // outside contructor() to allow aggregation(A,B,C).staticFunction() to be called etc.
        copyProps(base.prototype, mixin.prototype);
        copyProps(base, mixin);
    });
    return base;
}

Here is a little demo:

class Person{
   constructor(n){
      this.name=n;
   }
}
class Male{
   constructor(s='male'){
      this.sex=s;
   }
}
class Child{
   constructor(a=12){
      this.age=a;
   }
   tellAge(){console.log(this.name+' is '+this.age+' years old.');}
}
class Boy extends aggregation(Person,Male,Child){}
var m = new Boy('Mike');
m.tellAge(); // Mike is 12 years old.

This aggregation function will prefer properties and methods of a class that appear later in the class list.

  • 2
    when i try using this with react Component, it doesn't work. just FYI to anyone else who might have wanted it for this purpose. – r3wt May 13 '18 at 1:35
  • That overwrites variables and functions which have the same name. – Vincent Hoch-Drei Jul 11 '18 at 10:20
12

Justin Fagnani describes a very clean (imho) way to compose multiple classes into one using the fact that in ES2015, classes can be created with class expressions.

Expressions vs declarations

Basically, just like you can create a function with an expression:

function myFunction() {}      // function declaration
var myFunction = function(){} // function expression

you can do the same with classes:

class MyClass {}             // class declaration
var MyClass = class {}       // class expression

The expression is evaluated at runtime, when the code executes, whereas a declaration is executed beforehand.

Using class expressions to create mixins

You can use this to create a function that dynamically creates a class only when the function is called:

function createClassExtending(superclass) {
  return class AwesomeClass extends superclass {
    // you class body here as usual
  }
}

The cool thing about it is that you can define the whole class beforehand and only decide on which class it should extend by the time you call the function:

class A {}
class B {}
var ExtendingA = createClassExtending(A)
var ExtendingB = createClassExtending(B)

If you want to mix multiple classes together, because ES6 classes only support single inheritance, you need to create a chain of classes that contains all the classes you want to mix together. So let's say you want to create a class C that extends both A and B, you could do this:

class A {}
class B extends A {}
class C extends B {}  // C extends both A and B

The problem with this is that it's very static. If you later decide you want to make a class D that extends B but not A, you have a problem.

But with some smart trickery using the fact that classes can be expressions, you can solve this by creating A and B not directly as classes, but as class factories (using arrow functions for brevity):

class Base {} // some base class to keep the arrow functions simple
var A = (superclass) => class A extends superclass
var B = (superclass) => class B extends superclass
var C = B(A(Base))
var D = B(Base)

Notice how we only decide at the last moment which classes to include in the hierarchy.

Help us build the future!

Of course if you are like me, this inspires you to build the ultimate library for multiple inheritance in Javascript. If you're up to it, please help me doing exactly that! Check out this project and help out if you can!

mics

mics (pronounce: mix) is a library that makes multiple inheritance in Javascript a breeze. Inspired by the excellent blog post “Real” Mixins with Javascript Classes by Justin Fagnani, mics tries to build a minimal library around the concept of using class expressions (factories) as mixins. mics extends the concepts presented in the blog post by making the mixins first-class citizens that can be directly used to instantiate objects and can be mixed in with other mixins instead of just with classes.

8

This isn't really possible with the way prototypical inheritance works. Lets take a look at how inherited props work in js

var parent = {a: function() { console.log('ay'); }};
var child = Object.create(parent);
child.a() // first look in child instance, nope let's go to it's prototype
          // then look in parent, found! return the method

let's see what happens when you access a prop that doesn't exist:

child.b; // first look in child instance, nope let's go to it's prototype
         // then look in parent, nope let's go to it's prototype
         // then look in Object.prototype, nope let's go to it's prototype
         // then look at null, give up and return undefined

You can use mixins to get some of that functionality but you won't get late binding:

var a = {x: '1'};
var b = {y: '2'};
var c = createWithMixin([a, b]);
c.x; // 1
c.y; // 2
b.z = 3;
c.z; // undefined

vs

var a = {x: 1}
var o = Object.create(a);
o.x; // 1
a.y = 2;
o.y; // 2
  • Accepting @Pointy's answer because he talked about the extends keyword which is what the actual question was framed around and not inheritance patterns, but thank you for taking an interest! – BTC Apr 26 '15 at 15:38
2

I'v come up with these solution:

'use strict';

const _         = require( 'lodash' );

module.exports  = function( ParentClass ) {

    if( ! ParentClass ) ParentClass = class {};

    class AbstractClass extends ParentClass {
        /**
         * Constructor
        **/
        constructor( configs, ...args ) {
            if ( new.target === AbstractClass )
                throw new TypeError( "Cannot construct Abstract instances directly" );

            super( args );

            if( this.defaults === undefined )
                throw new TypeError( new.target.name + " must contain 'defaults' getter" );

            this.configs = configs;
        }
        /**
         * Getters / Setters
        **/
        // Getting module configs
        get configs() {
            return this._configs;
        }
        // Setting module configs
        set configs( configs ) {
            if( ! this._configs ) this._configs = _.defaultsDeep( configs, this.defaults );
        }
    }

    return AbstractClass;
}

usage:

const EventEmitter  = require( 'events' );
const AbstractClass = require( './abstracts/class' )( EventEmitter );

class MyClass extends AbstractClass {
    get defaults() {
        return {
            works: true,
            minuses: [
                'u can have only 1 class as parent wich was\'t made by u',
                'every othere classes should be your\'s'
            ]
        };
    }
}

As long as you'r making these trick with your customly writen classes it can be chained. but us soon as u want to extend some function/class written not like that - you will have no chance to continue loop.

const EventEmitter  = require( 'events' );
const A = require( './abstracts/a' )(EventEmitter);
const B = require( './abstracts/b' )(A);
const C = require( './abstracts/b' )(B);

works for me in node v5.4.1 with --harmony flag

  • I don't think you need harmony flag for node 4x and above. – Umayr Apr 19 '16 at 9:21
2

From the page es6-features.org/#ClassInheritanceFromExpressions, it is possible to write an aggregation function to allow multiple inheritance:

class Rectangle extends aggregation(Shape, Colored, ZCoord) {}

var aggregation = (baseClass, ...mixins) => {
    let base = class _Combined extends baseClass {
        constructor (...args) {
            super(...args)
            mixins.forEach((mixin) => {
                mixin.prototype.initializer.call(this)
            })
        }
    }
    let copyProps = (target, source) => {
        Object.getOwnPropertyNames(source)
            .concat(Object.getOwnPropertySymbols(source))
            .forEach((prop) => {
            if (prop.match(/^(?:constructor|prototype|arguments|caller|name|bind|call|apply|toString|length)$/))
                return
            Object.defineProperty(target, prop, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(source, prop))
        })
    }
    mixins.forEach((mixin) => {
        copyProps(base.prototype, mixin.prototype)
        copyProps(base, mixin)
    })
    return base
}

But that is already provided in libraries like aggregation.

1

use Mixins for ES6 multiple Inheritence.

let classTwo = Base => class extends Base{
    // ClassTwo Code
};

class Example extends classTwo(ClassOne) {
    constructor() {
    }
}
  • 3
    isn't multiple inheritance supposed to mean one class inherits from 2 or more unrelated classes? What your example shows is one class inheriting from 2, but related classes. This is single inheritance, not multiple inheritance. – vlad-ardelean Nov 29 '16 at 19:56
  • @vlad-ardelean Actually the relation is artificial, ie. established dynamically by calling classTwo. Lacking a genuine class concept, JS has no structural inheritance anyway. Offhand I cannot conceive a JS scenario where mixins behave differently from what you'd expect conceptualizing them as MI from the true OO world (apart from the defined 'super'-chain); maybe some person more knowledgeable than me can supply one. – collapsar Apr 18 '18 at 17:59
1

Well Object.assign gives you the possibility to do something close albeit a bit more like composition with ES6 classes.

class Animal {
    constructor(){ 
     Object.assign(this, new Shark()) 
     Object.assign(this, new Clock()) 
  }
}

class Shark {
  // only what's in constructor will be on the object, ence the weird this.bite = this.bite.
  constructor(){ this.color = "black"; this.bite = this.bite }
  bite(){ console.log("bite") }
  eat(){ console.log('eat') }
}

class Clock{
  constructor(){ this.tick = this.tick; }
  tick(){ console.log("tick"); }
}

let animal = new Animal();
animal.bite();
console.log(animal.color);
animal.tick();

I've not seen this used anywhere but it's actually quite useful. You can use function shark(){} instead of class but there are advantages of using class instead.

I believe the only thing different with inheritance with extend keyword is that the function don't live only on the prototype but also the object itself.

Thus now when you do new Shark() the shark created has a bite method, while only its prototype has a eat method

  • This won't work. Prototype methods won't be mixed in and the binding will be wrong. – jonschlinkert Mar 15 '18 at 2:22
1

There is no easy way to do multiple class inheritance. I follow the combination of association and inheritance to achieve this kind of behavior.

    class Person {
        constructor(firstname, lastname, age){
            this.firstname = firstname,
            this.lastname = lastname
            this.Age = age
        }

        fullname(){
                return this.firstname +" " + this.lastname;
            } 
    }

    class Organization {
        constructor(orgname){
            this.orgname = orgname;
        }
    }

    class Employee extends Person{
        constructor(firstname, lastname, age,id) {
            super(firstname, lastname, age);
            this.id = id;
        }

    }
    var emp = new Employee("John", "Doe", 33,12345);
    Object.assign(emp, new Organization("Innovate"));
    console.log(emp.id);
    console.log(emp.orgname);
    console.log(emp.fullname());

Hope this is helpful.

1

This ES6 solution worked for me:

multiple-inheritance.js

export function allOf(BaseClass, ...Mixins) {

  function copyProperties(target, source) {
    const allPropertyNames = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(source).concat(Object.getOwnPropertySymbols(source))

    allPropertyNames.forEach((propertyName) => {
      if (propertyName.match(/^(?:constructor|prototype|arguments|caller|name|bind|call|apply|toString|length)$/))
        return
      Object.defineProperty(target, propertyName, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(source, propertyName))
    })
  }

  class Base extends BaseClass
  {
    constructor (...args) {
      super(...args)

      Mixins.forEach((Mixin) => {
        copyProperties(this, new Mixin(...args))
      })
    }
  }

  Mixins.forEach((mixin) => {
    copyProperties(Base.prototype, Mixin.prototype)
  })

  return Base
}

main.js

import { allOf } from "./multiple-inheritance.js"

class A
{
    constructor(name) {
        this.name = name
    }
    sayA() {
        return this.name
    }
}

class B
{
    constructor(name) {
        this.name = name
    }
    sayB() {
        return this.name
    }
}

class AB extends allOf(A, B)
{
    sayAB() {
        return this.name
    }
}

const ab = new AB("ab")
console.log("ab.sayA() = "+ab.sayA()+", ab.sayB() = "+ab.sayB()+", ab.sayAB() = "+ab.sayAB())

Yields on browser-console:

ab.sayA() = ab, ab.sayB() = ab, ab.sayAB() = ab
  • ES6 is JavaScript! – Bergi Jan 10 '18 at 10:53
1

I will add my solution as well - I found it the most friendly for myself from what I read in this thread.

export const aggregate = (...mixins) => (Base) => {
  const copyProps = (target, source) => {
    Object.getOwnPropertyNames(source)
      .concat(Object.getOwnPropertySymbols(source))
      .forEach((prop) => {
        if (prop.match(/^(?:constructor|prototype|arguments|caller|name|bind|call|apply|toString|length)$/)) {
          return;
        }
        Object.defineProperty(target, prop, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(source, prop));
      });
  };
  mixins.forEach((mixin) => {
    copyProps(Base, mixin);
    copyProps(Base.prototype, mixin.prototype);
  });
  return Base;
};

You can use it then like this:

class _MyBaseClass {}
const MyBaseClass = aggregate(ExtensionOne, ExtensionTwo)(_MyBaseClass);
1

I spent half a week trying to figure this out myself, and wrote a whole article on it, https://github.com/latitov/OOP_MI_Ct_oPlus_in_JS, and hope it helps some of you.

In short, here's how MI can be implemented in JavaScript:

    class Car {
        constructor(brand) {
            this.carname = brand;
        }
        show() {
            return 'I have a ' + this.carname;
        }
    }

    class Asset {
        constructor(price) {
            this.price = price;
        }
        show() {
            return 'its estimated price is ' + this.price;
        }
    }

    class Model_i1 {        // extends Car and Asset (just a comment for ourselves)
        //
        constructor(brand, price, usefulness) {
            specialize_with(this, new Car(brand));
            specialize_with(this, new Asset(price));
            this.usefulness = usefulness;
        }
        show() {
            return Car.prototype.show.call(this) + ", " + Asset.prototype.show.call(this) + ", Model_i1";
        }
    }

    mycar = new Model_i1("Ford Mustang", "$100K", 16);
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = mycar.show();

And here's specialize_with() one-liner:

function specialize_with(o, S) { for (var prop in S) { o[prop] = S[prop]; } }

Again, please look at https://github.com/latitov/OOP_MI_Ct_oPlus_in_JS.

0

use extent with custom function to handle multiple inheritance with es6

var aggregation = (baseClass, ...mixins) => {
    let base = class _Combined extends baseClass {
        constructor (...args) {
            super(...args)
            mixins.forEach((mixin) => {
                mixin.prototype.initializer.call(this)
            })
        }
    }
    let copyProps = (target, source) => {
        Object.getOwnPropertyNames(source)
            .concat(Object.getOwnPropertySymbols(source))
            .forEach((prop) => {
            if (prop.match(/^(?:constructor|prototype|arguments|caller|name|bind|call|apply|toString|length)$/))
                return
            Object.defineProperty(target, prop, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(source, prop))
        })
    }
    mixins.forEach((mixin) => {
        copyProps(base.prototype, mixin.prototype)
        copyProps(base, mixin)
    })
    return base
}

class Colored {
    initializer ()     { this._color = "white" }
    get color ()       { return this._color }
    set color (v)      { this._color = v }
}

class ZCoord {
    initializer ()     { this._z = 0 }
    get z ()           { return this._z }
    set z (v)          { this._z = v }
}

class Shape {
    constructor (x, y) { this._x = x; this._y = y }
    get x ()           { return this._x }
    set x (v)          { this._x = v }
    get y ()           { return this._y }
    set y (v)          { this._y = v }
}

class Rectangle extends aggregation(Shape, Colored, ZCoord) {}

var rect = new Rectangle(7, 42)
rect.z     = 1000
rect.color = "red"
console.log(rect.x, rect.y, rect.z, rect.color)

0

As a proof of concept, I did the following function. It takes a list of classes and composes them into a new class (the last prototype wins so there are no conflicts). When creating a composed function, the user can choose to use all original constructors [sic!] or pass their own. This was the biggest challenge of this experiment: to come up with a description of what constructor should do. Copying methods into a prototype is not an issue but what's the intended logic of newly composed object. Or maybe it should be constructorless? In Python, from what I know, it finds the matching constructor but functions in JS are more accepting, hence one can pass to a function just about everything and from signature it won't be clear.

I don't think it's optimised but the purpose was exploring possibilities. instanceof will not behave as expected which, I guess, is a bummer, since class-oriented developers like to use this as a tool.

Maybe JavaScript just doesn't have it.

/*
    (c) Jon Krazov 2019

    Below is an experiment searching boundaries of JavaScript.
    It allows to compute one class out of many classes.

    Usage 1: Without own constructor

    If no constructor is passed then constructor of each class will be called
    with params passed in object. In case of missing params, constructor
    will be called without params.

    Example:

    const MyClass1 = computeClass([Class1, Class2, Class3]);
    const myClass1Instance = new MyClass1({
        'Class1': [1, 2],
        'Class2': ['test'],
        'Class3': [(value) => value],
    });

    Usage 2: With own constructor

    If constructor is passed in options object (second param) then it will
    be called in place of constructors of all classes.

    Example:

    const MyClass2 = computeClass([Class1, Class2, Class3], {
        ownConstructor(param1) {
            this.name = param1;
        }
    });
    const myClass2Instance = new MyClass2('Geoffrey');
*/

// actual function

var computeClass = (classes = [], { ownConstructor = null } = {}) => {
    const noConstructor = (value) => value != 'constructor';

    const ComputedClass = ownConstructor === null
        ? class ComputedClass {
            constructor(args) {
                classes.forEach((Current) => {
                    const params = args[Current.name];

                    if (params) {
                        Object.assign(this, new Current(...params));
                    } else {
                        Object.assign(this, new Current());
                    }
                })
            }
        }
        : class ComputedClass {
            constructor(...args) {
                if (typeof ownConstructor != 'function') {
                    throw Error('ownConstructor has to be a function!');
                }
                ownConstructor.call(this, ...args);
            } 
        };

    const prototype = classes.reduce(
        (composedPrototype, currentClass) => {
            const partialPrototype = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(currentClass.prototype)
                .reduce(
                    (result, propName) =>
                        noConstructor(propName)
                            ? Object.assign(
                                    result,
                                    { [propName]: currentClass.prototype[propName] }
                                )
                            : result,
                    {}
                );

            return Object.assign(composedPrototype, partialPrototype);
        },
        {}
    );

    Object.entries(prototype).forEach(([prop, value]) => {
	Object.defineProperty(ComputedClass.prototype, prop, { value });
    });
    
    return ComputedClass;
}

// demo part

var A = class A {
    constructor(a) {
        this.a = a;
    }
    sayA() { console.log('I am saying A'); }
}

var B = class B {
    constructor(b) {
        this.b = b;
    }
    sayB() { console.log('I am saying B'); }
}

console.log('class A', A);
console.log('class B', B);

var C = computeClass([A, B]);

console.log('Composed class');
console.log('var C = computeClass([A, B]);', C);
console.log('C.prototype', C.prototype);

var c = new C({ A: [2], B: [32] });

console.log('var c = new C({ A: [2], B: [32] })', c);
console.log('c instanceof A', c instanceof A);
console.log('c instanceof B', c instanceof B);

console.log('Now c will say:')
c.sayA();
c.sayB();

console.log('---');

var D = computeClass([A, B], {
    ownConstructor(c) {
        this.c = c;
    }
});

console.log(`var D = computeClass([A, B], {
    ownConstructor(c) {
        this.c = c;
    }
});`);

var d = new D(42);

console.log('var d = new D(42)', d);

console.log('Now d will say:')
d.sayA();
d.sayB();

console.log('---');

var E = computeClass();

console.log('var E = computeClass();', E);

var e = new E();

console.log('var e = new E()', e);

Originally posted here (gist.github.com).

-3

Here's an awesome/really crappy way of extending multiple classes. I'm utilizing a couple functions that Babel put into my transpiled code. The function creates a new class that inherits class1, and class1 inherits class2, and so on. It has its issues, but a fun idea.

var _typeof = typeof Symbol === 'function' && typeof Symbol.iterator === 'symbol' ? function (obj) {
  return typeof obj
} : function (obj) {
  return obj && typeof Symbol === 'function' && obj.constructor === Symbol ? 'symbol' : typeof obj
}

function _inherits (subClass, superClass) {
  if (typeof superClass !== 'function' && superClass !== null) {
    throw new TypeError('Super expression must either be null or a function, not ' + (
      typeof superClass === 'undefined' ? 'undefined' : _typeof(superClass)))
  }
  subClass.prototype = Object.create(
    superClass && superClass.prototype,
    {
      constructor: {
        value: subClass,
        enumerable: false,
        writable: true,
        configurable: true
      }
    })
  if (superClass) {
    Object.setPrototypeOf
    ? Object.setPrototypeOf(subClass, superClass)
    : subClass.__proto__ = superClass.__proto__  // eslint-disable-line no-proto
  }
}

function _m (...classes) {
  let NewSuperClass = function () {}
  let c1 = NewSuperClass
  for (let c of classes) {
    _inherits(c1, c)
    c1 = c
  }
  return NewSuperClass
}

import React from 'react'

/**
 * Adds `this.log()` to your component.
 * Log message will be prefixed with the name of the component and the time of the message.
 */
export default class LoggingComponent extends React.Component {
  log (...msgs) {
    if (__DEBUG__) {
      console.log(`[${(new Date()).toLocaleTimeString()}] [${this.constructor.name}]`, ...msgs)
    }
  }
}

export class MyBaseComponent extends _m(LoggingComponent, StupidComponent) {}

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