14

Say I have a vector of characters with 8 letters, with each one occurring twice:

x <- rep(LETTERS[1:8],2)
set.seed(1)
y <- sample(x)
y

# [1] "E" "F" "A" "D" "C" "B" "C" "G" "F" "A" "B" "G" "E" "H" "D" "H"

I want to find the intervals between each pair of letters. Here, interval refers to the number of letters between the two identical letters. I can do this manually like this:

abs(diff(which(y=="A")))-1  #6
abs(diff(which(y=="D")))-1  #10
abs(diff(which(y=="H")))-1  #1

I wrote a for loop to do this...

res<-NULL
for(i in 1:8){  res[[i]] <- abs(diff(which(y==LETTERS[i])))-1 }

names(res)<-LETTERS[1:8]
res

# A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H 
# 6  4  1 10 11  6  3  1 

However, I want to use this approach in a randomization process with very long vectors. Speed is essential for this - I wonder if anyone has good ideas for making the fastest approach to this problem as possible.

13

Using data.table::chmatch is considerably faster.

library(data.table)   
f <- function(x){
  ux <- unique(x)
  out <- length(x) - chmatch(ux, rev(x)) - chmatch(ux, x)
  setNames(out, ux)
}

f(y)
# E  F  A  D  C  B  G  H 
#11  6  6 10  1  4  3  1 

It is about 2x faster than cmpalex.

set.seed(007); xx = sample(rep(make.unique(rep_len(LETTERS, 1e3)), each = 2))
microbenchmark::microbenchmark(cmpalex(xx), f(xx), unit="relative")
#Unit: relative
#        expr      min       lq    mean   median       uq      max neval
# cmpalex(xx) 2.402806 2.366553 2.33802 2.359145 2.324677 2.232852   100
#       f(xx) 1.000000 1.000000 1.00000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000   100

R version 3.2.0 (2015-04-16)
Running under: Windows 8 x64 (build 9200)   

other attached packages:
[1] data.table_1.9.5
16

You'll want to set up an index vector and then do a diff(index vector)-by-group operation.


Here's how it looks in the data.table package:

require(data.table)
yDT <- data.table(y)

yDT[,diff(.I)-1,keyby=y]
#    y V1
# 1: A  6
# 2: B  4
# 3: C  1
# 4: D 10
# 5: E 11
# 6: F  6
# 7: G  3
# 8: H  1

The index vector here is the special (built in) variable .I, that stores the row number.

keyby=y groups by y and sorts the result alphabetically; alternately with by=y, we would see the results sorted by first appearance of the group. (Thanks, @Arun, for pointing this out.)


The analogous solution in base R looks like

tapply(1:length(y),y,diff)-1
# A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H 
# 6  4  1 10 11  6  3  1 
  • 4
    Use keyby instead of [order()] to directly order by y here.. – Arun Apr 26 '15 at 20:51
12

Another alternative:

alex = function(x)
{
    ux = unique(x)
    mux = match(x, ux)      
    ans = integer(length(ux))       
    for(i in seq_along(x)) ans[mux[i]] = i - ans[mux[i]]        
    return(setNames(ans - 1L, ux))
}
alex(y)
# E  F  A  D  C  B  G  H 
#11  6  6 10  1  4  3  1

Compared to the other alternatives:

frank1 = function(x) tapply(1:length(x), x, diff) - 1

library(data.table)
frank2 = function(x) data.table(x)[, diff(.I) - 1, by = x]

jaehyeon = function(x) sapply(unique(x), function(X) abs(diff(which(x == X))) - 1)

library(data.table)
khashaa = function(x)
{
    ux = unique(x)
    setNames(length(x) - chmatch(ux, rev(x)) - chmatch(ux, x), ux)
}

khashaa_base = function(x)
{
    ux = unique(x)
    setNames(length(x) - match(ux, rev(x)) - match(ux, x), ux) 
}

frank1(y)
# A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H 
# 6  4  1 10 11  6  3  1 
frank2(y)
#   x V1
#1: E 11
#2: F  6
#3: A  6
#4: D 10
#5: C  1
#6: B  4
#7: G  3
#8: H  1
jaehyeon(y)
# E  F  A  D  C  B  G  H 
#11  6  6 10  1  4  3  1
khashaa(y)
# E  F  A  D  C  B  G  H 
#11  6  6 10  1  4  3  1
khashaa_base(y)
# E  F  A  D  C  B  G  H 
#11  6  6 10  1  4  3  1

And on a benchmark:

#compiled versions for all for consistency:
cmpalex = compiler::cmpfun(alex)
cmpfrank1 = compiler::cmpfun(frank1)
cmpfrank2 = compiler::cmpfun(frank2)
cmpjaehyeon = compiler::cmpfun(jaehyeon)
cmpkhashaa = compiler::cmpfun(khashaa)
cmpkhashaa_base = compiler::cmpfun(khashaa_base)

set.seed(007); xx = sample(rep(make.unique(rep_len(LETTERS, 1e3)), each = 2))

sort_by_names = function(x) x[order(names(x))]
sum(sort_by_names(alex(xx)) != frank1(xx))
#[1] 0
sum(alex(xx) != setNames(frank2(xx)[[2]], frank2(xx)[[1]]))
#[1] 0
sum(alex(xx) != jaehyeon(xx))
#[1] 0
sum(alex(xx) != khashaa(xx))
#[1] 0
sum(alex(xx) != khashaa_base(xx))
#[1] 0


microbenchmark::microbenchmark(alex(xx), cmpalex(xx), 
                               frank1(xx), cmpfrank1(xx), 
                               frank2(xx), cmpfrank2(xx), 
                               jaehyeon(xx), cmpjaehyeon(xx), 
                               khashaa(xx), cmpkhashaa(xx), 
                               khashaa_base(xx), cmpkhashaa_base(xx), times = 20)
#Unit: microseconds
#                expr       min         lq    median         uq       max neval
#            alex(xx)  3472.726  3620.1055  3764.005  4157.9445  5382.221    20
#         cmpalex(xx)  1056.538  1074.6345  1115.177  1251.0720  2131.172    20
#          frank1(xx) 19441.559 19858.8145 20356.808 21159.3035 27471.738    20
#       cmpfrank1(xx) 19166.288 19566.4925 20572.222 21108.8430 22243.335    20
#          frank2(xx) 12592.156 12931.6325 13337.057 14092.5725 24015.020    20
#       cmpfrank2(xx) 12396.578 12861.3365 13376.904 14012.3575 14542.715    20
#        jaehyeon(xx) 45313.525 46875.1900 47514.821 48728.3085 49513.578    20
#     cmpjaehyeon(xx) 44899.401 46496.7365 47748.330 49561.9505 82592.347    20
#         khashaa(xx)   189.314   204.1045   220.982   235.0760   259.959    20
#      cmpkhashaa(xx)   190.010   201.3200   234.032   240.1225   389.415    20
#    khashaa_base(xx)   295.802   315.1170   328.167   360.5320  1353.038    20
# cmpkhashaa_base(xx)   295.803   301.8930   317.901   332.8650   379.323    20

EDIT: Included/fixed other alternatives. Byte code compilation improved only the function with the explicit loop; other alternatives were compiled just for completeness. Khashaa's smart workaround is, also, the fastest so far.

  • interesting - how come your alex function is so much faster despite a for loop being part of it? – jalapic Apr 26 '15 at 22:52
  • @jalapic *apply functions like tapply are just wrappers (or "syntactic sugar") for loops, they say, and so shouldn't be faster. In this case, I think a simple ans[mux] <- seq_along(x)-ans[mux] could replace the loop (with little to no speed gain). I haven't learned to use match yet, but have seen it shown to be very fast before. – Frank Apr 26 '15 at 23:42
  • 1
    I think you should remove the order part from @Franks solution as your function doesn't order the results. And there is no need in two line. It probably should be just data.table(x)[, diff(.I) - 1, by = x] – David Arenburg Apr 27 '15 at 9:56
  • 2
    @jalapic: tapply is just a wrapper to R's basic "split/apply" operations which are costly. I guess "data.table" has to perform extra "database-y" operations (?). sapply iterates over the vector multiple times to check for equality while manipulating a one-iteration hashing with match should be faster. @DavidArenburg: Fixed answer per your comments; thanks. – alexis_laz Apr 27 '15 at 15:48
3

I'd do as following.

sapply(unique(x), function(x) abs(diff(which(y==x)))-1)
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H 
6  4  1 10 11  6  3  1 

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