3

Trying to check if all items within sub-arrays are the same. For example, I have a 5x5 board and I want to know if one of the arrays contains all x's:

board =     [[47, 44, 71, 8, 88],
        ['x', 'x', 'x', 'x', 'x'],
      # [83, 85, 97, 'x', 57],
        [83, 85, 97, 89, 57],
        [25, 31, 96, 68, 51],
        [75, 70, 54, 80, 83]]

I currently have:

def check_x
  board.each do |x|
   return true if x.include?('x')
  end
   return false
end

But this will merely check if one of the integers is x and not all. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

2
  • Your question indicates you are looking for an element of board (a row of the playing board) that contains all x's, but your title and first sentence suggest you looking for an element of board whose elements are all the same, but not any particular value. Please edit to clarify whether all elements of a row must be the same or must equal a specified value. Commented Apr 27, 2015 at 2:51
  • If you are not inclined to edit your question to clarify, I would appreciate the courtesy of a reply to my comment. Commented Apr 27, 2015 at 15:57

5 Answers 5

6

A bit more idiomatic:

board.one? { |row| row.all? { |item| item == 'x' } }

3
  • Interestingly enough I have tried both solutions. However, when attempting @kiddorails solution, the output still rings true if there is only one 'x', and I need it to ring true if only ALL are 'x'. I did use board.one? and that did work. Although I am unfamiliar with exactly how .one? works.
    – Nappstir
    Commented Apr 26, 2015 at 20:43
  • Enumerable#one? takes each entry in the container and passes it to the given block. If the block evaluates to true for exactly one record, the whole method returns true. Commented Apr 26, 2015 at 20:45
  • 1
    If you want strictly one row to have all "x", keep the one?. Otherwise use any?, which means at least one row is all "x" Commented Apr 26, 2015 at 20:50
2

As simple as board.map { |row| row.uniq.count == 1 } will do
#=> [false, true, false, false, false]

uniq returns unique elements in an array. map here is iterating over your array and passing one row at a time to the block. It will return true for cases where all elements in an array are same (['x', 'x', 'x', 'x', 'x'].uniq #=> ['x'] whose length is 1)

If you just want to check if any row in board has all duplicate elements, ruby has just a function. Guess what? any?. Just change above one-liner with any? as:

board.any? { |row| row.uniq.count == 1 } #=> true

If you want to find out which row(s) has/have all the duplicates, and what duplicate it has:

board.each.with_index.select { |row, index| row.uniq.count == 1 }
#=> [[["x", "x", "x", "x", "x"], 1]], where 1 is index.

Pure Ruby awesomeness.

10
  • Added more information to play around with Ruby arrays.
    – kiddorails
    Commented Apr 26, 2015 at 20:42
  • This didn't seem to work when I ran it with board having only one 'x'. Still came back as true when I'm looking for it to only return true if all items within array are 'x'.
    – Nappstir
    Commented Apr 26, 2015 at 20:43
  • Can you give the board object in question in this case? Didn't fully get the scenario.
    – kiddorails
    Commented Apr 26, 2015 at 20:45
  • Beware that if the row is all filled with 1 or any other identical value, uniq will still return true, even though it's not x's. Commented Apr 26, 2015 at 20:46
  • @ma_li: Travis stated " if all items within sub-arrays are the same", I don't think he is only expecting the x to be there to check the duplicates. x is just an example.
    – kiddorails
    Commented Apr 26, 2015 at 20:48
0

if all elements are same in an array, that means maximum and minimum is equal. for your board you can find index of desired sub-array with this one line

board.each {|b| puts board.index(b) if b.max == b.min}

or just replace x.include?("x") with x.min == x.max in your function for true/false result

5
  • if a row of board is [1,'x'], [1,'x'].max #=> ArgumentError: comparison of String with 1 failed. Commented Apr 27, 2015 at 1:58
  • @CarySwoveland look at the sentence before the last one in OP. "but this will merely check if one of the integers is x and not all".
    – marmeladze
    Commented Apr 27, 2015 at 6:24
  • The penultimate sentence? :-) Yes, Travis is explaining why his code doesn't work. Suppose board = [['x',1],['x','x']]. Then your code returns ArgumentError: comparison of Fixnum with String failed. Specifically, it is ['x',1].max that failed.. Commented Apr 27, 2015 at 6:46
  • that means i've totally misunderstood :) i just thought that the x is just placeholder. there can be any other integer number and it seemed more rational to me
    – marmeladze
    Commented Apr 27, 2015 at 7:21
  • I'm pretty sure 'x' is meant to be a string, because of the quotes. Commented Apr 27, 2015 at 15:50
0

Assuming all elements of board (rows of the board) are the same size, which seems a reasonable assumption, you could do it thus:

x_row = ['x']*board.first.size
  #=> ["x", "x", "x", "x", "x"] 
board.any? { |row| row == x_row }
  #=> true
0

Assuming it's always a fixed length array, your method can just be:

def full_row
  board.each do |row| 
    return true if (row.uniq.count == 1) && (row[0] == 'x')
  end

  return false
end

This could be boiled down to fewer lines, but I hate line wrapping in vim :p

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.