10

I'm starting off with a very simple example in multithreading. I'm trying to make a threadsafe counter. I want to create two threads that increment the counter intermittently to reach 1000. Code below:

public class ThreadsExample implements Runnable {
     static int counter = 1; // a global counter

     public ThreadsExample() {
     }

     static synchronized void incrementCounter() {
          System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + ": " + counter);
          counter++;
     }

     @Override
     public void run() {
          while(counter<1000){
               incrementCounter();
          }
     }

     public static void main(String[] args) {
          ThreadsExample te = new ThreadsExample();
          Thread thread1 = new Thread(te);
          Thread thread2 = new Thread(te);

          thread1.start();
          thread2.start();          
     }
}

From what I can tell, the while loop right now means that only the first thread has access to the counter until it reaches 1000. Output:

Thread-0: 1
.
.
.
Thread-0: 999
Thread-1: 1000

How do I fix that? How can I get the threads to share the counter?

  • Why do you think the while loop means that? – RealSkeptic Apr 26 '15 at 21:25
  • 3
    There is nothing to "fix". Switching betwen threads is expensive, and the scheduler will not alternatingly let the threads run for single calls to incrementCounter. Increase your loop variable from 1000 to, say, 1000000, then you'll see that the threads indeed do change in-between. – Marco13 Apr 26 '15 at 21:34
  • 1
    @Marco13 Whilst this is a primitive example and there is indeed no point to switch between threads, there exist cases where short but critical tasks like this are not executed due to one thread hogging the monitor, causing thread starvation, potentially halting progress. In that case, there is definitely something to "fix", by implementing a fairness policy. – initramfs Apr 26 '15 at 22:01
  • what do you mean by "fix that"? Your program works as expected. When more than one threads run in parallel, JVM is not obliged to provide processor time to all of them. Or did you expect something else? – Alexei Kaigorodov Apr 27 '15 at 13:50
19

Both threads have access to your variable.

The phenomenon you are seeing is called thread starvation. Upon entering the guarded portion of your code (sorry I missed this earlier), other threads will need to block until the thread holding the monitor is done (i.e. when the monitor is released). Whilst one may expect the current thread pass the monitor to the next thread waiting in line, for synchronized blocks, java does not guarantee any fairness or ordering policy to which thread next recieves the monitor. It is entirely possible (and even likely) for a thread that releases and attempts to reacquire the monitor to get hold of it over another thread that has been waiting for a while.

From Oracle:

Starvation describes a situation where a thread is unable to gain regular access to shared resources and is unable to make progress. This happens when shared resources are made unavailable for long periods by "greedy" threads. For example, suppose an object provides a synchronized method that often takes a long time to return. If one thread invokes this method frequently, other threads that also need frequent synchronized access to the same object will often be blocked.

Whilst both of your threads are examples of "greedy" threads (since they repeatedly release and reacquire the monitor), thread-0 is technically started first, thus starving thread-1.

The solution is to use a concurrent synchronization method that supports fairness (e.g. ReentrantLock) as shown below:

public class ThreadsExample implements Runnable {
    static int counter = 1; // a global counter

    static ReentrantLock counterLock = new ReentrantLock(true); // enable fairness policy

    static void incrementCounter(){
        counterLock.lock();

        // Always good practice to enclose locks in a try-finally block
        try{
            System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + ": " + counter);
            counter++;
        }finally{
             counterLock.unlock();
        }
     }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        while(counter<1000){
            incrementCounter();
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ThreadsExample te = new ThreadsExample();
        Thread thread1 = new Thread(te);
        Thread thread2 = new Thread(te);

        thread1.start();
        thread2.start();          
    }
}

note the removal of the synchronized keyword in favor of the ReentrantLock within the method. Such a system, with a fairness policy, allows long waiting threads a chance to execute, removing the starvation.

13

You could use the AtomicInteger. It is a class that can be incremented atomically, so two seperate threads calling its increment method do not interleave.

public class ThreadsExample implements Runnable {
     static AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger(1); // a global counter

     public ThreadsExample() {
     }

     static void incrementCounter() {
          System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + ": " + counter.getAndIncrement());
     }

     @Override
     public void run() {
          while(counter.get() < 1000){
               incrementCounter();
          }
     }

     public static void main(String[] args) {
          ThreadsExample te = new ThreadsExample();
          Thread thread1 = new Thread(te);
          Thread thread2 = new Thread(te);

          thread1.start();
          thread2.start();          
     }
}
1

Well, with your code I don't know how to get "exactly" intermittently, but if you use Thread.yield() after call incrementCounter() you will have a better distribution.

public void run() {
         while(counter<1000){
              incrementCounter();
              Thread.yield();

         }
    }

Otherwise, to get what you propose, you can create two different thread class (ThreadsExample1 and ThreadsExample2 if you want), and another class to be a shared variable.

public class SharedVariable {
    private int value;
    private boolean turn; //false = ThreadsExample1 --> true = ThreadsExample2

    public SharedVariable (){
        this.value = 0;
        this.turn = false;
    }

    public void set (int v){
        this.value = v;
    }

    public int get (){
        return this.value;
    }

    public void inc (){
        this.value++;
    }

    public void shiftTurn(){
        if (this.turn){
            this.turn=false;
        }else{
            this.turn=true;
        }
    }

    public boolean getTurn(){
        return this.turn;
    }

}

Now, the main can be:

public static void main(String[] args) {
        SharedVariable vCom = new SharedVariable();
        ThreadsExample1 hThread1 = new ThreadsExample1 (vCom);
        ThreadsExample2 hThread2 = new ThreadsExample2 (vCom);

        hThread1.start();
        hThread2.start();

        try {
            hThread1.join();
            hThread2.join();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }

And you have to change your line static int counter = 1; // a global counter for private SharedVariable counter;

And the new run is:

public void run() {
    for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
        while (!counter.getTurno()){
            Thread.yield();
        }
        System.out.println(this.counter.get());
        this.counter.cambioTurno();
    }
}

}

Yes, it is another code, but I think it can help you a little bit.

0

try to sleep a thread to ensure that the other will have a go:

     @Override
     public void run() {
          while(counter<1000){
               incrementCounter();
               Thread.sleep(1);
          }
     }
  • Calling sleep() is OK for demos and experiments, but if you ever call sleep() in a real program, then you probably are either re-inventing ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor, or else making a mistake. – Solomon Slow Apr 27 '15 at 13:21

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