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I'm using Entity Framework with Effort that uses NMemory to test without having actual database side-effects. Is there any way to view the sql that's being sent to the nmemory database?

Edit: Thanks to @Gert_Arnold I have been looking in to DbContext.Database.Log. Unfortunately my output looks like below. Can anyone comment on this? I'm assuming I'm getting these null entries instead of my sql.

Opened connection at 4/27/2015 11:08:22 AM -05:00
Started transaction at 4/27/2015 11:08:22 AM -05:00
<null>
-- Executing at 4/27/2015 11:08:23 AM -05:00
-- Completed in 132 ms with result: 1

<null>
-- Executing at 4/27/2015 11:08:23 AM -05:00
-- Completed in 5 ms with result: 1

Committed transaction at 4/27/2015 11:08:23 AM -05:00
Closed connection at 4/27/2015 11:08:23 AM -05:00
Disposed transaction at 4/27/2015 11:08:23 AM -05:00
Opened connection at 4/27/2015 11:08:24 AM -05:00
Started transaction at 4/27/2015 11:08:24 AM -05:00
<null>
-- Executing at 4/27/2015 11:08:24 AM -05:00
-- Completed in 8 ms with result: 1

Committed transaction at 4/27/2015 11:08:24 AM -05:00
Closed connection at 4/27/2015 11:08:24 AM -05:00
Disposed transaction at 4/27/2015 11:08:24 AM -05:00
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    DbContext.Database.Log – Gert Arnold Apr 26 '15 at 22:41
  • Did you ever find a solution? – Nikolaj Dam Larsen Jun 2 '15 at 13:06
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    @Impero, No you can't capture the sql because no sql is being generated. It's just how either effort or nmemory do things. – lanierhall Jun 3 '15 at 20:48
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    @BunnyStrider Thank you. I actually read my way to the same thing after I posted my comment, but I appreciate you getting back to me. May I suggest you accept that as an answer to your own question? The reason I wanted to see the SQL generated, was to check what was inserted in the many-to-many relation tables (for the relations where I don't specifically add the many-to-many entities in the model). Instead of checking the SQL for this info, I found a way to directly access the NMemory database using reflection, thus getting a glimpse of the data in those relation tables. – Nikolaj Dam Larsen Jun 4 '15 at 21:30
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You can intercept and log the commands.

 // Before command is sent tell EF about the new interceptor
 DbInterception.Add(new MyEFDbInterceptor());


// The interceptor class is called by , see the various interface methods
// just a couple shown here.
public class MyEFDbInterceptor: IDbCommandInterceptor   {
  public void ReaderExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<DbDataReader> interceptionContext)    {
     Debug.Writeln(command.CommandText );
     //Debug.Writeln(interceptionContext.Result ); // might be interesting use
}

 public void ReaderExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<DbDataReader> interceptionContext)
{
  Debug.Writeln(command.CommandText );

}

 }
  • Looked promising. CommandText is always null, must be Effort framework doing stuff differently. – lanierhall Apr 27 '15 at 17:35
  • try all the methods, check in debugger. I was seeing sql commands when i last tested. – phil soady Apr 27 '15 at 18:01
  • Like I said, I'm using a testing framework called Effort effort.codeplex.com I think they are doing something different. I did check in the debugger, CommandText is always null in every method – lanierhall Apr 27 '15 at 18:07

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