90

Why isn't is possible to use objects in for of loops? Or is this a browser bug? This code doesn't work in Chrome 42, saying undefined is not a function:

test = { first: "one"}

for(var item of test) {
  console.log(item)
}
3
  • Is test an array or object? Apr 27, 2015 at 0:17
  • 12
    @KickButtowski, can't you see? It is definitely an object.
    – Green
    Aug 18, 2016 at 5:31
  • 4
    for (let key of Object.keys(test)) { ... }
    – clocksmith
    Feb 14, 2017 at 21:15

14 Answers 14

75

The for..of loop only supports iterable objects like arrays, not objects.

To iterate over the values of an object, use:

for (var key in test) {
    var item = test[key];
}
9
  • 3
    @DanielHerr Having an .iterable member function, which is where the error comes from when you try to use it on an object (which doesn't have it). developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…
    – Overv
    Apr 27, 2015 at 0:40
  • 4
    I mean, why don't objects have that? What would be the problem with natively adding it? Apr 27, 2015 at 0:43
  • 3
    @DanielHerr I don't have the answer to that, you'll have to ask the people who design the language.
    – Overv
    Apr 27, 2015 at 0:44
  • 6
    @DanielHerr If the Object "base class" were iterable, so would any Function/Date/etc "subclass" amongst other complications. See esdiscuss.org/topic/es6-iteration-over-object-values#content-5 for a more thorough/accurate discussion of your question though.
    – natevw
    Jul 7, 2016 at 0:06
  • 5
    With this for..in solution, don't you still technically have to do a check for if (test.hasOwnProperty(key)){ ... }? Or is that not needed?
    – tennisgent
    Sep 13, 2016 at 22:33
54

You can use this syntax:

const myObject = {
  first: "one",
  second: "two",
};

for (const [key, value] of Object.entries(myObject)) {
  console.log(key, value);  // first one, second two
}

However, Object.entries has poor support right now does not work in IE or iOS Safari. You'll probably might need a polyfill. See https://caniuse.com/mdn-javascript_builtins_object_entries for the latest scoop.

See also Object.keys to iterate just the keys, or Object.values for just the values.

36

If you are storing data in a key-value store, please use Map which is explicitly designed for this purpose.

If you have to use an object though, ES2017 (ES8) allows you to use Object.values:

const foo = { a: 'foo', z: 'bar', m: 'baz' };
for (let value of Object.values(foo)) {
    console.log(value);
}

If that isn't supported yet, use a polyfill: Alternative version for Object.values()

And finally if you're supporting an older environment that don't support this syntax, you'll have to resort to using forEach and Object.keys:

var obj = { a: 'foo', z: 'bar', m: 'baz' };
Object.keys(obj).forEach(function (prop) {
    var value = obj[prop];
    console.log(value);
});
5
  • couldn't Object prototype be extended to support this?
    – Sonic Soul
    Jun 26, 2016 at 19:41
  • 1
    @SonicSoul: technically yes, but it's generally not advised to extend the Object prototype as (pretty much) everything inherits from it. Jun 29, 2016 at 10:27
  • 1
    Object.entries can by polyfilled without touching the prototype.
    – mpen
    Aug 10, 2016 at 23:16
  • 5
    Why use maps instead of objects? Oct 30, 2016 at 17:42
  • 1
    Is there any advantage to using these complex examples over a simple for-in?
    – 1252748
    Aug 16, 2017 at 23:25
18

Iterator, Iterable and for..of loop in ECMAScript 2015/ ES6

let tempArray = [1,2,3,4,5];

for(element of tempArray) {
  console.log(element);
}

// 1
// 2
// 3
// 4
// 5

But if we do

let tempObj = {a:1, b:2, c:3};

for(element of tempObj) {
   console.log(element);
}
// error

We get error because for..of loop works only on Iterables, that is, the object which has an @@iterator that adheres to Iterator protocol, meaning it must have an object with a next method. The next method takes no arguments and it should return an object with these two properties.

done: signals that the sequence has ended when true, and false means there may be more values value: this is the current item in the sequence

So, to make an object Iterable that is to make it work with for..of we can:

1 .Make an object an Iterable by assigning to it’s mystical @@iterator property through the Symbol.iterator property.Here is how:

let tempObj = {a:1, b:2, c:3};

tempObj[Symbol.iterator]= () => ({
next: function next () {
return {
    done: Object.keys(this).length === 0,
    value: Object.keys(this).shift()
     }
    }
  })

for(key in tempObj){
 console.log(key)
}
// a
// b
// c

2.Use Object.entries, which returns an Iterable:

let tempObj = {a:1, b:2, c:3};

for(let [key, value] of Object.entries(tempObj)) {
    console.log(key, value);
}
// a 1
// b 2
// c 3

3.Use Object.keys, here is how:

let tempObj = {a:1, b:2, c:3};
for (let key of Object.keys(tempObj)) {
    console.log(key);
}

// a
// b
// c

Hope this helps!!!!!!

16

I made objects iterable with this code:

Object.prototype[Symbol.iterator] = function*() {
 for(let key of Object.keys(this)) {
  yield([ key, this[key] ])
} }

Usage:

for(let [ key, value ] of {}) { }

Alternativly:

for(let [ key, value ] of Object.entries({})) { }
19
  • 51
    No idea why this is the accepted solution. Modifying the prototype unless its a polyfill is always a terrible idea. Aug 11, 2016 at 17:21
  • 2
    @user1703761 It is the accepted solution because it works. Please explain what problems this will cause if it is so terrible. Aug 11, 2016 at 19:58
  • 9
    There are all sorts of issues, mainly forward compatibility ones. One example is that Array.prototype.includes which was previously names contains but Moo Tools extended the prototype and the implementation was incompatible, see bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1075059 Also look up the Prototype library desaster ;) Aug 11, 2016 at 21:27
  • 4
    I believe that this will not have forward compatibility issues because if an iterator was added to objects this would overwrite it and if an iterator was added to an object subtype it would use the subtype iterator. Aug 11, 2016 at 22:59
  • 4
    Hey guys, modifying the prototype is a bad idea!!! Let's shame the OP for actually giving an answer to the question! Nov 16, 2016 at 23:02
12

Because object literal does not have the Symbol.iterator property. To be specific, you can only iterate over String, Array, Map, Set, arguments, NodeList(not widely support) and Generator with for...of loop.

To deal with Object Literal iteration, you have two options.

for...in

for(let key in obj){
    console.log(obj[key]); 
}

Object.keys + forEach

Object.keys(obj).forEach(function(key){
    console.log(obj[key]);
});
3

The answer is No. It's not possible to use For..Of with Object literals.

I agree with Overv that For..Of is only for iterables. I had exactly the same question because I use Objects to iterate over keys and values with for..in. But I just realized that that's what ES6 MAPS and SETS are for.

let test = new Map();
test.set('first', "one");
test.set('second', "two");

for(var item of test) {
  console.log(item); // "one" "two"
}

Hence it achieves the goal of not having to use for..In (validating with hasOwnProperty) and not having to use Object.keys().

Additionally, your keys aren't limited to strings. You can use numbers, objects, or other literals.

2

Object literals don't have built-in iterators, which are required to work with for...of loops. However, if you don't want to go thru the trouble of adding your own [Symbol.iterator] to your object, you can simply use the Object.keys() method. This method returns an Array object, which already has a built-in iterator, so you can use it with a for...of loop like this:

const myObject = {
    country: "Canada",
    province: "Quebec",
    city: "Montreal"
}

for (let i of Object.keys(myObject)) {
    console.log("Key:", i, "| Value:", myObject[i]);
}

//Key: country | Value: Canada
//Key: province | Value: Quebec
//Key: city | Value: Montreal
1
  • Using keys every time is more trouble than adding an iterator once. Also, Object.keys() is ES5. Sep 25, 2016 at 17:31
1

It is possible to define an iterator over any giving object, this way you can put different logic for each object

var x = { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }
x[Symbol.iterator] = function* (){
    yield 1;
    yield 'foo';
    yield 'last'
}

Then just directly iterate x

for (let i in x){
    console.log(i);
}
//1
//foo
//last

It is possible to do the same thing on the Object.prototype object And have a general iterator for all objects

Object.prototype[Symbol.iterator] = function*() {
    for(let key of Object.keys(this)) {
         yield key 
    } 
 }

then iterate your object like this

var t = {a :'foo', b : 'bar'}
for(let i of t){
    console.log(t[i]);
}

Or this way

var it = t[Symbol.iterator](), p;
while(p = it.next().value){
    console.log(t[p])
}
1

I just did the following to easily console out my stuff.

for (let key in obj) {
  if(obj.hasOwnProperty(key){
    console.log(`${key}: ${obj[key]}`);
  }
}
1

Using Array Destruction you can iterate it as follows using forEach

const obj = { a: 5, b: 7, c: 9 };

Object.entries(obj).forEach(([key, value]) => {
  console.log(`${key} ${value}`); // "a 5", "b 7", "c 9"
});
1

How about using Object.keys to get an array of keys? And then forEach on the Array?

obj = { a: 1, b:2}
Object.keys(obj).forEach( key => console.log(`${key} => ${obj[key]}`))
0

What about using

function* entries(obj) {
    for (let key of Object.keys(obj)) {
        yield [key, obj[key]];
    }
}

for ([key, value] of entries({a: "1", b: "2"})) {
    console.log(key + " " + value);
}
0

in ES6 you could go with generator:

var obj = {1: 'a', 2: 'b'};

function* entries(obj) {
  for (let key of Object.keys(obj)) {
    yield [key, obj[key]];
  }
}

let generator = entries(obj);

let step1 = generator.next();
let step2 = generator.next();
let step3 = generator.next();

console.log(JSON.stringify(step1)); // {"value":["1","a"],"done":false}
console.log(JSON.stringify(step2)); // {"value":["2","b"],"done":false}
console.log(JSON.stringify(step3)); // {"done":true}

Here is the jsfiddle. In the output you will get an object with the "value" and "done" keys. "Value" contains everything you want it to have and "done" is current state of the iteration in bool.

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