110

If I add @Builder to a class. The builder method is created.

Person.builder().name("john").surname("Smith").build();

I have a requirement where a particular field is required. In this case, the name field is required but the surname is not. Ideally, I would like to declare it like so.

Person.builder("john").surname("Smith").build()

I can't work out how to do this. I have tried adding the @Builder to a constructor but it didn't work.

@Builder
public Person(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}
2

15 Answers 15

113

You can do it easily with Lombok annotation configuration

import lombok.Builder;
import lombok.ToString;

@Builder(builderMethodName = "hiddenBuilder")
@ToString
public class Person {

    private String name;
    private String surname;

    public static PersonBuilder builder(String name) {
        return hiddenBuilder().name(name);
    }
}

And then use it like that

Person p = Person.builder("Name").surname("Surname").build();
System.out.println(p);

Of course @ToString is optional here.

17
  • 4
    it would be better if you could explain a bit more.
    – Blip
    Jun 16, 2015 at 12:19
  • 61
    what's not making sense to me with this answer is that hiddenBuilder() isn't hidden...
    – Kevin Day
    Mar 17, 2016 at 20:15
  • 5
    @AkshatAgarwal what makes the builder method hidden? I'm 99.99% certain the builderMethodName just changes the name of the method - it doesn't change the method to hidden. So I'm still not seeing any way to achieve the desired outcome of having required fields.
    – Kevin Day
    Nov 9, 2016 at 1:08
  • 18
    I would just tell Lombok to make the builder private: @Builder(builderMethodName = "hiddenBuilder", access = AccessLevel.PRIVATE)
    – Linus
    Oct 22, 2019 at 20:19
  • 9
    @Linus it seems like adding AccessLevel.PRIVATE makes all of the builder's methods private as well, and deems it quite useless. Am I mistaken? Jan 26, 2020 at 12:16
62

I would recommend against this approach, as you will struggle to apply it consistently on other objects. Instead, you can just mark fields with @lombok.NonNull annotation and Lombok will generate null checks for you in the constructor and setters, so that Builder.build() will fail, if those fields are not set.

Using builder pattern allows you to have very clear identification of which fields you're setting to which values. This is already lost for name field in your example, and it will further be lost for all other required fields, if you're building an object with multiple required fields. Consider the following example, can you tell which field is which just by reading code?

Person.builder("John", "Michael", 16, 1987) // which is name, which is surname? what is 16?
    .year(1982) // if this is year of birth, then what is 1987 above?
    .build()
9
  • 66
    Runtime error vs Compile time error. Always favour a compile time error!
    – jax
    Mar 30, 2016 at 22:08
  • 9
    @jax They don't check the same thing. Requiring a field to be set doesn't check for null value. Checking for null will be runtime error (in pure Java) regardless of whether you require the field or not. Apr 1, 2016 at 6:35
  • 1
    Uh I see what you mean now, but your method allows null values also. Better to be upfront with the object contract rather than making the programmer guess. Have a look at the builder pattern in the book called "Effective Java 2nd edition" .
    – jax
    Apr 1, 2016 at 12:03
  • 7
    You can construct null fields with the previous answers too like Person.builder(null).lastName("John").build(); so you will still need a runtime check no matter what. May 11, 2018 at 17:43
  • 2
    @LakatosGyula, I do agree, but I think that by convention, developers have a smaller chance of calling the required fields with null, you will probably have more mistakes using a regular builder, it's a tradeoff, and I'd go with Anton's answer. Apr 11, 2020 at 16:19
35

Taking Kevin Day's answer a step further:

@Builder
@Getter
@AllArgsConstructor(access = AccessLevel.PRIVATE) // If immutability is desired
@ToString
public class Person {
    @NonNull // Presumably name cannot be null since its required by the builder
    private final String name;
    private final String surname;

    private static PersonBuilder builder() {
        return new PersonBuilder();
    }

    public static PersonBuilder builder(String name){
        return builder().name(name);
    }

}

It's not ideal, but it provides compile time enforcement and callers of this class will have exactly one builder method to use.

5
  • 3
    fine, but it's still possible to override the value (by mistake) by calling .name() so we would have: Person.builder("john").surname("smith").name("mark").build(); and of course ultimately we would get mark not desired john. I know that it is a little far-fetched case but possible, and perfect solution would avoid that situtation. Do you think it is possible to defend against that ? (I'm dealing with that right now) Oct 27, 2018 at 17:34
  • 1
    @user3529850 if you have required fields AND for some reason immutability concerns within the context of your builder, then you are better off just writing your highly custom builder the old fashion way, withoutt Lombok. Note that in the example that I gave, Person IS immutable. You can only set the name exactly one time. What you are doing is setting the name multiple times on the PersonBuilder, which is not intended to be immutable. Oct 28, 2018 at 9:59
  • @user3529850 Even with the classic builder approach you can always pass null in the constructor... Jun 16, 2019 at 10:24
  • @AmitGoldstein obviously, Java does not have a built-in static code analyzer to detect null values, this has nothing to do with Lombok implementation of Builder pattern
    – Kronen
    Nov 26, 2021 at 1:09
  • Made a choice for me Apr 25, 2023 at 9:21
24

Here's another approach:

@Builder()
@Getter
@ToString
public class Person {

    private final String name;
    private final String surname;

    public static PersonBuilder builder(String name){
        return new PersonBuilder().name(name);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Person p = Person.builder("John Doe")
                .surname("Bill")
                .build();
    }
}
4
  • I prefer your approach, as it simply overloads the builder method making syntax concise and natural.
    – Jezor
    Sep 3, 2016 at 0:51
  • 10
    The problem with this approach is that builder() is still visible, so it doesn't really make the parameters required. By all means, yes, we need to also use the @NonNull annotation - but that's a runtime check - definitely not good enough if one is trying to craft a super intuitive object. It's a shame that there isn't a way to tailor this sort of thing in lombok - even if we could make a way to make the builder() method private, we could then create our own overloaded public builder(...) method with required params.
    – Kevin Day
    Nov 9, 2016 at 1:12
  • 2
    Apperantly something changed within the last five years, so builder() would not be available anymore with this approach. In contrast to the accepted anwear, this also doesn't give me a non-hidden hiddenBuilder(), which makes this my favourite approach. Apr 19, 2021 at 9:54
  • Thanks for the heads up @TobiasGrunwald - this makes my approach pretty much perfect (though it does give me a little concern about backwards compatibility for anyone who was still accessing the no-arg builder method!)
    – Kevin Day
    Apr 19, 2021 at 22:29
18

The simpliest solution is to add a @lombok.NonNull to all mandatory values. The Builder will fail to build the object when mandatory fields are not set.

Here's a JUnit test to demonstrate the behavior of all combinations of final and @NonNull:

import static org.junit.Assert.fail;

import org.junit.Test;

import lombok.Builder;
import lombok.ToString;

public class BuilderTests {
    @Test
    public void allGiven() {
        System.err.println(Foo.builder()
            .nonFinalNull("has_value")
            .nonFinalNonNull("has_value")
            .finalNull("has_value")
            .finalNonNull("has_value")
            .build());
    }

    @Test
    public void noneGiven() {
        try {
            System.err.println(Foo.builder()
                .build()
                .toString());
            fail();
        } catch (NullPointerException e) {
            // expected
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void nonFinalNullOmitted() {
        System.err.println(Foo.builder()
            .nonFinalNonNull("has_value")
            .finalNull("has_value")
            .finalNonNull("has_value")
            .build());
    }

    @Test
    public void nonFinalNonNullOmitted() {
        try {
            System.err.println(Foo.builder()
                .nonFinalNull("has_value")
                .finalNull("has_value")
                .finalNonNull("has_value")
                .build());
            fail();
        } catch (NullPointerException e) {
            // expected
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void finalNullOmitted() {
        System.err.println(Foo.builder()
            .nonFinalNull("has_value")
            .nonFinalNonNull("has_value")
            .finalNonNull("has_value")
            .build());
    }

    @Test
    public void finalNonNullOmitted() {
        try {
            System.err.println(Foo.builder()
                .nonFinalNull("has_value")
                .nonFinalNonNull("has_value")
                .finalNull("has_value")
                .build());
            fail();
        } catch (NullPointerException e) {
            // expected
        }
    }

    @Builder
    @ToString
    private static class Foo {
        private String nonFinalNull;

        @lombok.NonNull
        private String nonFinalNonNull;

        private final String finalNull;

        @lombok.NonNull
        private final String finalNonNull;
    }
}
8

This is my solution for the problem

import lombok.Builder;
import lombok.Data;
import lombok.NonNull;

@Data
@Builder(builderMethodName = "privateBuilder")
public class Person {
    @NonNull
    private String name;
    @NonNull
    private String surname;
    private int age;//optional

public static Url safeBuilder() {
    return new Builder();
}

interface Url {
    Surname name(String name);
}

interface Surname {
    Build surname(String surname);
}

interface Build {
    Build age(int age);
    Person build();
}

public static class Builder implements Url, Surname, Build {
    PersonBuilder pb = Person.privateBuilder();

    @Override
    public Surname name(String name) {
        pb.name(name);
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public Build surname(String surname) {
        pb.surname(surname);
        return this;

    }

    @Override
    public Build age(int age) {
        pb.age(age);
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public Person build() {
        return pb.build();
    }
    }
}

inspired by this blog post:

https://blog.jayway.com/2012/02/07/builder-pattern-with-a-twist/

2
4

Combining the answer from @Pawel and comment from Max ...

import lombok.Builder;
import lombok.ToString;

@Builder
public class Person {

  private String name;
  private String surname;

  public static PersonBuilder builder(String name) {
    return new PersonBuilder().name(name);
  }
}
1
  • 2
    Be aware that this, unfortunately, doesn't work with @SuperBuilder, since the generated builder class is also abstract.
    – Marv
    Dec 5, 2020 at 13:36
3

Take User class as example, id field is required:

@AllArgsConstructor(access = AccessLevel.PRIVATE) // required, see https://stackoverflow.com/questions/51122400/why-is-lombok-builder-not-compatible-with-this-constructor
@NoArgsConstructor(access = AccessLevel.PRIVATE)
@Builder
@Getter
public class User {
    private String id;
    private String name;
    private int age;

    public static UserBuilder builder(final String id) {
        return new UserBuilder().id(id);
    }
}

You can only initialize a User instance by builder like User user = User.builder("id-123").name("Tom").build;. With private no args constructer, you are not able to User user = new User(); or User user = new User("id-123"); so you always need to pass the required parameter id. Please note the initialized instance is immutable.

1
  • 1
    But i guess you can still call UserBuilder's default builder with no arguments, no one is stopping it.
    – Shadman R
    Jul 14, 2021 at 20:13
3

Here is an inspiration of Pawel response, with an hidden generated builder :

import lombok.Builder;
import lombok.ToString;

@Builder(builderMethodName = "")
@ToString
public class Person {

    private String name;
    private String surname;

    public static PersonBuilder builder(String name) {
        return new PersonBuilder().name(name);
    }
}
2

If you need this functionality, you can customize the builder class by yourself and you can still add @Builder Annotation.

@Builder
public class Person {

    public static class PersonBuilder {
        private String name;

        private PersonBuilder() {
        }

        public PersonBuilder(final String name) {
            this.name = name;
        }
    }

    private static PersonBuilder builder() {
        return null; // or we can throw exception.
    }

    public static PersonBuilder builder(final String name) {
        return new PersonBuilder(clientId);
    }
}
2

As much as I would like to have the compile time validation feature, the authors of the library had made it clear that the feature probably won't be added.

So my take on this is, to have something like this.

@Builder
public class Person {
  String name;
  Integer age;
  Optional optional;

  @Builder
  public class Optional {
    String surname;
    String companyName;
    String spouseName;
}

}

And you can use it like

 Person p = Person.builder()
            .age(40)
            .name("David")
            .optional(Person.Optional.builder()
                    .surname("Lee")
                    .companyName("Super Company")
                    .spouseName("Emma")
                    .build())
            .build();

No, there's no validation. But from the library's users point of view, it's pretty clear what's required and what's not and be able to build an object instance without looking at the documentation.

1

Best Practice:

import lombok.Builder;
import lombok.NonNull;

@Builder(builderMethodName = "privateBuilder")
public class Person {
    @NonNull
    private String name;
    private String surname;

    public static class PersonNameBuilder {
        public PersonBuilder name(String name) {
            return Person.privateBuilder().name(status);
        }
    }

    public static PersonNameBuilder builder(String name) {
        return new PersonNameBuilder();
    }

    private static PersonBuilder privateBuilder(){
        return new PersonBuilder();
    }
}

Usage:

PersonNameBuilder nameBuilder = Person.builder();
PersonBuilder builder = nameBuilder.name("John");
Person p1 = builder.surname("Smith").build();

// Or
Person p2 = Person.builder().name("John").surname("Smith").build();
0

In order to make limitations and risks implied by lombok's builder implementation as obvious as possible and therefore reduce the probability of erroneous abuse, I propose the following solution:

import lombok.Builder;

@Builder(builderClassName = "UnsafeBuilder")
public class Person {
    private String name;
    private String surname;

    public static UnsafeBuilder builder(String name) {
        return new UnsafeBuilder().name(name);
    }
}

Using this solution as intended is straightforward:

Person thePerson = Person.builder("the_name").surname("the_surname").build();

The only way to use the builder in an unintended way makes the risk obvious, and most probably won't be chosen by mistake:

final Person unsafePerson = new Person.UnsafeBuilder().surname("the_surname").build();

The class name could of course be chosen even more radically - for example NeverCallThisConstructor.

0

What about this approach?

import lombok.Data;
import lombok.experimental.Accessors;

@Data
@Accessors(chain = true, fluent = true)
public class Person {
    private final String name; // 'final' prevents lombok from creating a setter method
    private String surname;

    public Person(String name) {
        this.name = name; // mandatory
        this.surname = null; // optional, with default value of 'null'
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Person gabi = new Person("Gabriela");
        Person smith = new Person("John").surname("Smith");
        System.out.println(gabi);
        System.out.println(smith);
    }
}

Executing main() will print:

Person(name=Gabriela, surname=null)
Person(name=John, surname=Smith)

The combination of

@Data
@Accessors(chain = true, fluent = true)

Makes lombok create setters that return this instead of void, and the getters and setters will be named as the property names, without 'get' and 'set' prefix.

There will be a setter for surname(), but because name is final, there won't be a setter for name.

I guess this implemenation correctly accomodates the builder pattern when there are mandatory and optional fields.

0

As far as I'm concerned, The Gilbert Arenas Dagger's answer is the closest to perfect, but it's a bit verbose because it doesn't take into account what I call the "Unobtrusive Principle" of Lombok contract (in fact, I don't know, how it's called by authors - they just mention about it without any title):

Lombok NEVER generates methods with name, already present in class explicitly, unless @Tolerate annotation stands over this explicitly presented method

I call it the "Unobtrusive Principle" by analogy with Front-End - there was a popular similar principle for JavaScript some time ago

So, there is no need to write method private static PersonBuilder builder() in this example. You can just write return new PersonBuilder().name(name); instead of return builder().name(name); in your builder(String name) method - it will works exactly the same way:

import lombok.AllArgsConstructor;
import lombok.Builder;
import lombok.Getter;
import lombok.NonNull;
import lombok.experimental.FieldDefaults;

@Getter
@Builder
@FieldDefaults(level = PRIVATE, makeFinal = true)
@AllArgsConstructor(access = AccessLevel.PRIVATE) // If immutability is desired
public class Person {
    @NonNull String name; // Presumably name cannot be null since its required by the builder
    String surname;

    public static PersonBuilder builder(String name) {
        return new PersonBuilder().name(name);
    }
}

P.S. @FieldDefaults(level = PRIVATE, makeFinal = true) can be replaced with private final modifiers before every field, or lombok.config settings file in a root of project, contains this rules:

lombok.fieldDefaults.defaultPrivate = true
lombok.fieldDefaults.defaultFinal = true

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