1

I'm not talking about checking if a boolean is null as a means to check if it is initialized. Because that won't work. So I thought this might work:

public class MyClass{

    private boolean setting;

    private boolean getSetting{
        // get the setting;
    }

    public void main{
        if (setting != (true && false))
            setting = getSetting();
        // do main stuff;
    }

}

And it does! So my question is: would this be a good practice compared to the alternative, which would be the use of an extra variable:

public class MyClass{

    private boolean initialized = false;
    private boolean setting;

    private boolean getSetting{
        // get the setting;
    }

    public void main{
        if (!initialized)
            setting = getSetting();
            initialized = true;
        // do main stuff;
    }

}
1

if (setting != (true && false)) doesn't do what you think it's doing.

The expression (true && false) always evaluates to false: you're doing a logical AND on the literal values true and false.

That means that your test reduces to if (setting != false). Since setting is not initialized, it defaults to false. When the code runs it checks if (false != false), which evaluates to false.

When I run the code you posted it does not call getSetting, as expected.

In your example, best practice would be to initialize the variable inside the constructor:

public class MyClass {
    private boolean someSetting;

    public MyClass() {
        someSetting = getSetting();
    }

    private boolean getSetting() {
        ...
    }

    public void main() {
        // By the time this is called we can guarantee that someSetting has been initialized correctly
        // Do main stuff...
    }
}
3
  • Okay, that answers my question. Thank you very much. – Raf Colson Apr 27 '15 at 2:55
  • Make sure you click the 'accept answer' button on the answer that was most helpful to you. That will let people know that the question has been answered and help others to find the most useful answer quickly. – Cameron Skinner Apr 27 '15 at 2:57
  • @CameronSkinner "Most useful" is very subjective. Read here (top-rated answer): meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/291531/… – StrongJoshua Apr 27 '15 at 21:05
5

Booleans are a primitive type, therefore they do not need to be initialized. The default value for a boolean is false.

The first code sample returns false because the phrase true && false will always equate to false (&& checks whether both statements are true, which they aren't, so it is false) and then you check if setting, which is also false, is unequal to that, which it is not. An initialized variable could therefore be useful.

You can read more about defaults and primitive types here.

7
  • Thanks for your comment. Yes, I see. Of course if (setting != (true && false)) is the same as doing: if (setting) – Raf Colson Apr 27 '15 at 2:39
  • 1
    @RafColson No, the first of those two options will always return true, as I explained in my answer (try thinking through it logically yourself. Plug in true and/or false and see what your result is). The latter will only execute if setting is true, which in your case it never will be (since you didn't initialize it to be true). I recommend writing if(!setting) setting = getSetting(); – StrongJoshua Apr 27 '15 at 2:41
  • Yes. I'm sorry, I mistakenly forgot the ! there. It's because in my project I'm having: if (setting) return; But I wanted to keep the example in my question simple. But thanks for explaining. – Raf Colson Apr 27 '15 at 2:48
  • The first code sample will never call getSetting. if (setting != (true && false) does not check if setting equals both false and true; it checks if setting is not equal to the logical operation true && false. The expression true && false always evaluates to false. – Cameron Skinner Apr 27 '15 at 2:53
  • 1
    @d-b Boolean is an object so it has to be initialized. boolean on the other hand is a primitive, so it defaults to false. – StrongJoshua Nov 26 '20 at 9:36
0

The issue with (setting != (true && false)) has already been discussed, but the real issue is that the primitive boolean only has its two obvious options. It's always either true or false. If both of those are meaningful answers, then that value cannot also indicate whether it's been initialized or not. An initialized, meaningful false will look the same as not having been initialized.

The best solution if it's available is, as Cameron Skinner answered above, to ensure the variable is always initialized by doing so either where it's declared or in the constructor. That, however, requires that the answer to what setting should be is known at the time the class is instantiated.

If the proper value is not necessarily known at that point and might need to be set later (so having been deliberately set to false is a different situation than having never been set), then you have a couple options:

One is as shown in the initial post, to have a separate initialized variable telling you whether it's happened or not. That might look a little clunky, but it works.

The other option is to use a Boolean object rather than a boolean primitive for setting. A Boolean object can be set to either true or false, but it initially defaults to null, so you can use a check for null to determine whether it has been set or not.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.