21

I want to fire a Query "SELECT * FROM TABLE" but select only from row N+1. Any idea on how to do this?

  • 4
    Which rdbms are you using(f.e. oracle, mysql or sql-server)? – Tim Schmelter Apr 27 '15 at 11:38
  • 6
    Which dbms? "OFFSET n" is ANSI SQL, but many dbms products do this in their own ways, eg. LIMIT, TOP... – jarlh Apr 27 '15 at 11:38
  • 1
    Also, if you want to find rows in a given row-number range you could use functions like ROW_NUMBER. But that really depends on your dbms. – Tim Schmelter Apr 27 '15 at 11:40
  • Check ROW_NUMBER (). – George T Apr 27 '15 at 11:41
  • (a) In Relational Databases (ie. those that comply with the Relational Model), the rows are not ordered, any ordering that may be required in explicitly declared by the calling code via ORDER BY … (b) We don't have row numbers or ROW_NUMBER(), which is actually a Record ID. These are physical record (not row) locators, the RM demands logical Keys. (c) Therefore, in an RDb, your question does not exist, we SELECT … WHERE Key >= "value". It exists in Record Filing Systems, that have none of the Integrity, Power, or Speed of an RDb. – PerformanceDBA Apr 28 '15 at 2:25

11 Answers 11

9

Query: in

DECLARE @N INT = 5 --Any random number

SELECT * FROM (
        SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY ID) AS RoNum
              , ID --Add any fields needed here (or replace ID by *)
        FROM TABLE_NAME
) AS tbl 
WHERE @N < RoNum
ORDER BY tbl.ID

This will give rows of Table, where rownumber is starting from @N + 1.

  • The PRINCIPLE in the answer is OK as such, BUT he made an error and called both his key and counter the same thing..... Change to ".... as RoNu", and "where @N<RoNu" – Eske Rahn Jun 23 '18 at 15:41
  • (And of course you would normally include more columns than just the ID, simply supplement ID by a field list or replace by an asterisk in the inner select) – Eske Rahn Jun 23 '18 at 15:54
51

Use this:

SELECT *
FROM Sales.SalesOrderHeader 
ORDER BY OrderDate
OFFSET (@Skip) ROWS FETCH NEXT (@Take) ROWS ONLY

https://stackoverflow.com/a/19669165/1883345

  • 2
    NOTE: This query works only on SQL Server 2012 and above – Khurram Hassan Sep 6 '17 at 23:50
  • Also note the that the 'new' syntax strangely have a performance penalty linear with the @skip over the row_number approach (indexed order clause). On the other hand the syntax have the great benefit of being a pure appendage, so any script generated by something, ending with an order clause, can have this appended. – Eske Rahn Jun 24 '18 at 14:33
17

SQL Server:

select * from table
except
select top N * from table

Oracle up to 11.2:

select * from table
minus
select * from table where rownum <= N

with TableWithNum as (
    select t.*, rownum as Num
    from Table t
)
select * from TableWithNum where Num > N

Oracle 12.1 and later (following standard ANSI SQL)

select *
from table
order by some_column 
offset x rows
fetch first y rows only

They may meet your needs more or less.

There is no direct way to do what you want by SQL. However, it is not a design flaw, in my opinion.

SQL is not supposed to be used like this.

In relational databases, a table represents a relation, which is a set by definition. A set contains unordered elements.

Also, don't rely on the physical order of the records. The row order is not guaranteed by the RDBMS.

If the ordering of the records is important, you'd better add a column such as `Num' to the table, and use the following query. This is more natural.

select * 
from Table 
where Num > N
order by Num
  • 1
    ANSI SQL: "select * from tablename OFFSET n", and also in this case ORDER BY is recommended. – jarlh Apr 27 '15 at 12:29
  • 1
    (a) Yes, good Answer. See my comment on the Question. (b) In your last sentence, you don't necessaily need to add a column, just ORDER BY … whatever column is required, to obtain the result you need. (c) Capitalise the ORDER BY. – PerformanceDBA Apr 28 '15 at 2:29
9

In order to do this in SQL Server, you must order the query by a column, so you can specify the rows you want.

Example:

select * from table order by [some_column] 
offset 10 rows
FETCH NEXT 10 rows only
6

Do you want something like in LINQ skip 5 and take 10?

SELECT TOP(10) * FROM MY_TABLE  
WHERE ID not in (SELECT TOP(5) ID From My_TABLE);

This approach will work in any SQL version.

  • 1
    This is not a good approach! And anyway without order clause in both parts, you get an unpredictable result: Take 10 random excluding 5 random.... – Eske Rahn Jun 24 '18 at 14:38
  • 2
    The question is not about any particular order. It's about skip first N record from a table. By the way Select doesn't take random, it takes records in the orde were inserted to the table in the first place. – Carlos Toledo Jun 29 '18 at 19:01
  • 1
    It certainly IS about a particular order, as it might not be the ones you got in the first run, that is skipped in the second... There are NO guarantees that you get them in any particular order. Though an SQL COULD be implemented so sequentially added records unaltered would be returned in the same order - but you should not code assuming that.... - but even if an order is added the approach is bad if the number to skip is high – Eske Rahn Jun 29 '18 at 22:49
  • 1
    ... on the order part, see e.g. dba.stackexchange.com/questions/6051/… – Eske Rahn Jun 29 '18 at 23:00
  • As others have said, you absolutely need to include ORDER BY here. SELECT does not necessarily produce the records ordered by "where inserted to the table in the first place". – maembe Apr 11 at 19:49
5

I know it's quite late now to answer the query. But I have a little different solution than the others which I believe has better performance because no comparisons are performed in the SQL query only sorting is done. You can see its considerable performance improvement basically when value of SKIP is LARGE enough.

  1. Best performance but only for SQL Server 2012 and above. Originally from @Majid Basirati's answer which is worth mentioning again.

    DECLARE @Skip INT = 2, @Take INT = 2
    
    SELECT * FROM TABLE_NAME
    ORDER BY ID ASC
    OFFSET (@Skip) ROWS FETCH NEXT (@Take) ROWS ONLY
    
  2. Not as Good as the first one but compatible with SQL Server 2005 and above.

    DECLARE @Skip INT = 2, @Take INT = 2
    
    SELECT * FROM 
    (
        SELECT TOP (@Take) * FROM 
        (
            SELECT TOP (@Take + @Skip) * FROM TABLE_NAME
            ORDER BY ID ASC
        ) T1
        ORDER BY ID DESC
    ) T2
    ORDER BY ID ASC
    
  • Actually the ROW_NUMBER(...) approach gives a MUCH better performance than the OFFSET approach, if the offset is not very small (less than about 30). But the Offset have the in some scenarios great ability that it is a pure append to an existing ordered select.(perhaps generated dynamical by something out of our control) – Eske Rahn Jun 28 '18 at 15:13
3

What about:

SELECT * FROM table LIMIT 50 OFFSET 1
  • 5
    Note that this will not work in all flavors of SQL, as the LIMIT and OFFSET keywords are not part of the ANSI standard (see this question). – eykanal Jan 28 '16 at 21:42
1

This works with all DBRM/SQL, it is standard ANSI:

SELECT *
  FROM owner.tablename A
 WHERE condition
  AND  n+1 <= (
         SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT b.column_order)
           FROM owner.tablename B
          WHERE condition
            AND b.column_order>a.column_order
          )
ORDER BY a.column_order DESC
  • The coded select statement above skip the first n rows with bigger value in column_order. You can change condition to retrieve smaller, as you want. – fspino Apr 21 '17 at 12:07
0

In Faircom SQL (which is a pseudo MySQL), i can do this in a super simple SQL Statement, just as follows:

SELECT SKIP 10 * FROM TABLE ORDER BY Id

Obviously you can just replace 10 with any declared variable of your desire.

I don't have access to MS SQL or other platforms, but I'll be really surprised MS SQL doesn't support something like this.

0

try below query it's work

SELECT * FROM `my_table` WHERE id != (SELECT id From my_table LIMIT 1)

Hope this will help

-2

For SQL Server 2012 and later versions, the best method is @MajidBasirati's answer.

I also loved @CarlosToledo's answer, it's not limited to any SQL Server version but it's missing Order By Clauses. Without them, it may return wrong results.

For SQL Server 2008 and later I would use Common Table Expressions for better performance.

-- This example omits first 10 records and select next 5 records
;WITH MyCTE(Id) as
(
    SELECT TOP (10) Id 
    FROM MY_TABLE
    ORDER BY Id
)
SELECT TOP (5) * 
FROM MY_TABLE
    INNER JOIN MyCTE ON (MyCTE.Id <> MY_TABLE.Id) 
ORDER BY Id

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