13

I have a certain design strategy where the constructor of my class is private and can only be constructed by friends of the class. Inside the friend function, I am trying to create a unique_pointer of my class using std::make_uniquebut it doesn't compile. My VC12 compiler complains

c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 12.0\vc\include\memory(1639): error C2248: 'Spam::Spam' : cannot access private member declared in class 'Spam'

The relevant code which fails during compilation is as follows

#include <memory>
class Spam {
public:
    friend void Foo();

private:
    Spam(int mem) :mem(mem) {}
    int mem;
};
void Foo() {
    std::unique_ptr<Spam> spam = std::make_unique<Spam>(10);
}

Why am I not able to compile?

4 Answers 4

18

Here is another approach I've seen used, apparently known as the passkey idiom : have the public constructor require a private access token.

class Spam {
    struct Token {};
    friend void Foo();
public:
    Spam(Token, int mem) : mem(mem) {}

private:
    int mem;
};

void Foo() {
    std::unique_ptr<Spam> spam = std::make_unique<Spam>(Spam::Token{}, 10);
}

void Bar() {
    // error: 'Spam::Token Spam::token' is private
    // std::unique_ptr<Spam> spam = std::make_unique<Spam>(Spam::Token{}, 10);
}
9
  • The code compiles, but does not link with an error "undefined reference to `Spam::token'" Jul 3, 2018 at 7:44
  • @MathieuDutourSikiric wow, and it took three years before someone noticed as well... Fixed it, thanks!
    – Quentin
    Jul 3, 2018 at 8:07
  • I'm not sure you even need the Spam::Token preceding the {}
    – Caleth
    Jul 3, 2018 at 8:29
  • @Caleth I wouldn't if it wasn't for std::make_unique which needs to forward it, and thus know its type :)
    – Quentin
    Jul 3, 2018 at 8:30
  • Thanks for correction, but I wonder how it addresses the initial issue. The initial problem is that the constructor is private and make_unique is not friended with Spam. In your code the constructor is public. That certainly addresses the issue, but how are the Spam::Token helpful in this? Jul 4, 2018 at 9:04
17

In your case the function make_unique is trying to create an instance of Spam and that function is not a friend. Calling a non-friend function from inside a friend function does not imbue the non-friend function with friend status.

To solve this you can write in Foo:

std::unique_ptr<Spam> spam(new Spam(10));
3
  • Yes you are correct. Can you please add more details to the answer?
    – Abhijit
    Apr 27, 2015 at 12:51
  • There's no guarantee that make_unique won't delegate to an internal helper, in which case your friend will not work (not to mention that the signature is also wrong because make_unique takes its arguments by forwarding reference).
    – T.C.
    Apr 27, 2015 at 16:15
  • In general, this approach is susceptible to the problems make_unique is supposed to solve (namely the potential for memory leak)
    – ricab
    Sep 22, 2017 at 22:55
5
Why am I not able to compile?

You are unable to compile because make_unique is not a friend of Spam.

An alternative solution to making make_unique a friend is to move the creation of the unique_ptr into Spam.

class Spam {
   ...
private:
   Spam(int) {}

   static unique_ptr<Spam> create( int i ) 
   { return std::unique_ptr<Spam>( new Spam(i) ); }
};

and then have Foo call that instead.

void Foo() {
    std::unique_ptr<Spam> spam = Spam::create(10);
    ...
}
3
  • How is this any better than just using new directly in Foo?
    – ricab
    Sep 22, 2017 at 22:57
  • The use of such a construction is to force the user of the API into RAII. That way it is more difficult to create a memory leak. Calling Foo will delete spam and spam will be deleted if an exception is thrown later on inside Foo.
    – Thomas
    Sep 24, 2017 at 14:14
  • But you are not forcing RAII: Foo can still call new if it wants since it is a friend. And it may decide to use unique_ptr in any case. The point is that make_unique is preferable to new. If you are going to drop it, then I don't see the benefit of the added complexity in this approach.
    – ricab
    Sep 24, 2017 at 14:34
1

In your example, Foo() is a friend, but it isn't the function that's creating the Spam - make_unique is internally calling new Spam itself. The simple fix is to just have Foo() actually construct the Spam directly:

void Foo() {
    std::unique_ptr<Spam> spam(new Spam(10));
}

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