100

How can I use switch in blade templates? When I used:

@switch($login_error)
    @case(1)
        `E-mail` input is empty!
        @break
    @case(2)
        `Password` input is empty!
        @break
@endswitch

in result I see this text as plaintext. I prefer to use switch in few piece of code because it's more clean for me than when I using if.

But if it's not possible just write it.

4
  • 3
  • @ventaquil The selected answer is incorrect. Can the answer be changed to the one I have posted? Nov 24, 2016 at 10:38
  • @captainblack sorry but this solution is for Laravel 5.2+ - we are using 5.1 LTS.
    – ventaquil
    Dec 1, 2016 at 8:05
  • 4
    laravel 5.5 introduces switch statements. your code should render properly.
    – Szaman
    Aug 31, 2017 at 11:56

9 Answers 9

166

Updated 2020 Answer

Since Laravel 5.5 the @switch is built into the Blade. Use it as shown below.

@switch($login_error)
    @case(1)
        <span> `E-mail` input is empty!</span>
        @break

    @case(2)
        <span>`Password` input is empty!</span>
        @break

    @default
        <span>Something went wrong, please try again</span>
@endswitch

Older Answer

Unfortunately Laravel Blade does not have switch statement. You can use Laravel if else approach or use use plain PHP switch. You can use plain PHP in blade templates like in any other PHP application. Starting from Laravel 5.2 and up use @php statement.

Option 1:

@if ($login_error == 1)
    `E-mail` input is empty!
@elseif ($login_error == 2)
    `Password` input is empty!
@endif
0
30

You can just add these code in AppServiceProvider class boot method.

Blade::extend(function($value, $compiler){
        $value = preg_replace('/(\s*)@switch\((.*)\)(?=\s)/', '$1<?php switch($2):', $value);
        $value = preg_replace('/(\s*)@endswitch(?=\s)/', '$1endswitch; ?>', $value);
        $value = preg_replace('/(\s*)@case\((.*)\)(?=\s)/', '$1case $2: ?>', $value);
        $value = preg_replace('/(?<=\s)@default(?=\s)/', 'default: ?>', $value);
        $value = preg_replace('/(?<=\s)@breakswitch(?=\s)/', '<?php break;', $value);
        return $value;
    });

then you can use as:

@switch( $item )
    @case( condition_1 )
        // do something
    @breakswitch
    @case( condition_2 )
        // do something else
    @breakswitch
    @default
        // do default behaviour
    @breakswitch
@endswitch

Enjoy It~

7
  • This doesn't work. parse error, expecting &quot;endswitch (T_ENDSWITCH)&quot;&#039; or &quot;case (T_CASE)&quot;&#039; or &quot;default (T_DEFAULT)`
    – andres.gtz
    Feb 26, 2016 at 23:50
  • @mkmnstr, Try to replace ` ' ` to ` " ` in preg_replace method?
    – Germey
    Feb 27, 2016 at 6:26
  • 5
    Anyone upvoted since these comments? Does this work?
    – Jonathan
    Nov 10, 2016 at 10:52
  • 1
    Using Laravel 5.4, does not work for me. FatalThrowableError Class 'App\Providers\Blade' not found Aug 8, 2017 at 23:15
  • 1
    It does work on 5.5. I would just be curious on how to get it to work with phpstorm autocompletion (or any IDE) @Germey ? Oct 23, 2017 at 2:20
22

IN LARAVEL 5.2 AND UP:

Write your usual code between the opening and closing PHP statements.

@php
switch (x) {
    case 1:
        //code to be executed
        break;
    default:
        //code to be executed
}
@endphp
1
  • 2
    This @php syntax is very useful in L5.2 > Dec 16, 2016 at 6:11
7

In Laravel 5.1, this works in a Blade:

<?php
    switch( $machine->disposal ) {
        case 'DISPO': echo 'Send to Property Disposition'; break;
        case 'UNIT':  echo 'Send to Unit'; break;
        case 'CASCADE': echo 'Cascade the machine'; break;
        case 'TBD':   echo 'To Be Determined (TBD)'; break;
    }
?>
0
7

This is now built in Laravel 5.5 https://laravel.com/docs/5.5/blade#switch-statements

0
1

You can extend blade like so:

    Blade::directive('switch', function ($expression) {
        return "<?php switch($expression): ?>";
    });
    Blade::directive('case', function ($expression) {
        return "<?php case $expression: ?>";
    });
    Blade::directive('break', function () {
        return "<?php break; ?>";
    });
    Blade::directive('default', function () {
        return "<?php default: ?>";
    });
    Blade::directive('endswitch', function () {
        return "<?php endswitch; ?>";
    });

You can then use the following:

@switch($test)
@case(1)
        Words
@break
@case(2)
    Other Words
    @break
@default
    Default words
@endswitch

However do note the warnings in : http://php.net/manual/en/control-structures.alternative-syntax.php

If there is any whitespace between the switch(): and the first case then the whole code block will fail. That is a PHP limitation rather than a blade limitation. You may be able to bypass it by forcing the normal syntax e.g.:

Blade::directive('switch', function ($expression) {
    return "<?php switch($expression) { ?>";
});
Blade::directive('endswitch', function ($) {
    return "<?php } ?>";
});

But this feels a bit wrong.

0

It's a bit off-topic but for some reason, if the 'cases' are strings, using double quotes as such @case("foo") is not working as expected, in case you're experiencing such a problem, single quotes seem to work, so instead of @case("foo") use @case('foo'). Maybe someone with more information could shed some light on this.

Regards.

-2

To overcome the space in 'switch ()', you can use code :

Blade::extend(function($value, $compiler){
    $value = preg_replace('/(\s*)@switch[ ]*\((.*)\)(?=\s)/', '$1<?php switch($2):', $value);
    $value = preg_replace('/(\s*)@endswitch(?=\s)/', '$1endswitch; ?>', $value);
    $value = preg_replace('/(\s*)@case[ ]*\((.*)\)(?=\s)/', '$1case $2: ?>', $value);
    $value = preg_replace('/(?<=\s)@default(?=\s)/', 'default: ?>', $value);
    $value = preg_replace('/(?<=\s)@breakswitch(?=\s)/', '<?php break;', $value);
    return $value;
  });
-6

When you start using switch statements within your views, that usually indicate that you can further re-factor your code. Business logic is not meant for views, I would rather suggest you to do the switch statement within your controller and then pass the switch statements outcome to the view.

2
  • 10
    To be fair, switch statements can certainly belong in the view. For example, if you're setting CSS classes based on data ranges in a table, you wouldn't want to embed display logic in the controller.
    – CashIsClay
    Dec 10, 2015 at 23:46
  • "Business logic is not meant for views,". Business logic is for the visual layer, the logic layer and the persistence layer. Its tedious and redundant but a quality code does that.
    – magallanes
    Jun 7, 2016 at 16:49

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