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After speaking with developers, I have questions, "What framework do you use with your app?" and "What web technologies are you using on the front end?".

Therefore, in order to answer the exact question they are asking, what is the difference between "frameworks" and "technologies" in this context? How would I answer these two questions differently or do they both have the same answer?

For example, I thought that in a MEAN stack application, the "technologies" I am using are mongoDB, expressJS, angularJS, and nodeJS. What would be the "framework".

2 Answers 2

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Frameworks are a subset of technologies. All computer languages are technologies. All frameworks are written in computer languages to solve specific problems. The MEAN stack consists of many technologies. NodeJS is a web application framework, that allows JavaScript to run on the server. Express is used to create APIs. Angular is typically used on the client side to provide the front end experience. MongoDB is a technology but not a framework, its a piece of software that allows an application to persist data.

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Using your example of the MEAN stack, one could argue that a framework such as AngularJS is a subset of a given technology stack. I often think of a framework as a set of tools for ...... you know what, I think an analogy might better express my thoughts on this.

an analogy

construction = development?

Think of a general contractor (you know, the person(s) you call to come fix things around your house/work). So development is a lot like handy-man/construction work. They fix things, we fix things. They make you a new house or kitchen counter, we make applications... yada yada yada

components

Now think about the separate components in making a house:

  • plumbing
  • electric
  • framing
  • dry wall
  • roofing
  • finish work

I'd equate those to the separate things we use in development to serve our end goal:

  • database
  • services
  • client UI

the tools

Just like a plumber has special tools for his job, I view a framework like AngularJS as just another tool to serve the specialty of Client-side UI work. Bootstrap is a styling framework/tool just like a paint-roller is to finish work. The CSS or the Javascript are the nails and screws, but you can't build just a house with nails and screws, you need tools and methodologies to assemble your parts.

I dunno if that is the best analogy, but it's the one I've used for ages in explaining to laypersons what it is I do for my work and it seems to convey the point fairly well.

in closing...

... I think you can get away with the line of thinking that technology encompasses any frameworks you use. And by mentioning a framework (that they are familiar with) you are implying the technology.

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  • From this I gather that AngularJS is a framework, but also a technology; that frameworks are subsets of the technology stack, and that there are other 'things' besides frameworks in a technology stack. Is this correct? It follows - what is an example of something in a technology stack that is NOT a framework? Apr 27, 2015 at 17:29
  • 2
    We're certainly in the realm of semantics and there are probably some concrete definitions out there, but we're talking shop so.... I guess you have to define a threshold for what a framework is. Some may argue that Javascript IS a framework by virtue of providing APIs. I'd argue that it is not. So in my line of thinking, to answer your question, YES, there are other things besides frameworks in a tech stack. So examples? Javascript (in my book), CSS, HTML. But in reality one could turn this upside down and say 'what is a technology'. Then my argument is bunk
    – jusopi
    Apr 27, 2015 at 17:41
  • just curious to the responsible party why the downvote? While the question wasn't necessarily substantive, I'd say the answer was, no?
    – jusopi
    Apr 27, 2015 at 17:43

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