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So I have been reading about directives, services and controllers. I felt like I had a good understanding of what goes where. For example dom manipulation happens in a directive, api calls happen in a service. Then I needed to make a modal. My fist thought was this is a directive, then I looked at Angular UI and they have it set up as a service. I was surprised to see it as a service. Is this the correct way to do it, or is this considered and anti pattern? I read that Angular UI is a good place to look when learning, but I'm not sure? A modal is more confusing then I expected.

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    I can see it is directive, where did you see it as service? – ABOS Apr 27 '15 at 21:21
  • @ABOS In the code you can see that there are 2 factories defined (including the very first thing, perhaps what the OP is thinking of?), but there are also a number of directives defined. – David says Reinstate Monica Apr 27 '15 at 21:25
  • @ABOS Also, it actually makes sense that is is a service. You define your modal in JS code and just pass in some HTML (usually as a directive), so yeah, it is defined as a service (with helper directives). – David says Reinstate Monica Apr 27 '15 at 21:27
  • I think those services are just helpers, but you can always argue helpers are more fundamental since directives depend on them. – ABOS Apr 27 '15 at 21:34
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    I'd go for a service: a modal is likely triggered by an event and has no specific place in the DOM. Directives are extension of the HTML where you place custom components. However nothing prevent you to design the modal in a directive and use a servcie to instanciate it. – floribon Apr 27 '15 at 22:12
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The general rule in Angular is that DOM manipulation should take place only inside directives, and most of the time that rule applies. But there are some situations where a declarative approach doesn't feel right, to say the least, because those situations are intrinsically imperative. Modals and custom alerts are two examples, to name a few.

To exemplify what I'm saying, take a look at this example taken from a similar question I answered some time ago:

Imperative approach

app.controller('Ctrl', function($scope, $dialog) {
    $scope.doSomething = function() {
        $dialog.dialog().open().then(function(result) {
           if (result === 'OK') {
               // Process OK
           }
           else {
               // Process anything else
           }
        });
    }
});

Back in the day AngularUI's $modal was called $dialog.

Declarative approach

<dialog visible="dialogVisible" callback="dialogCallback()"></dialog>

...

app.controller('Ctrl', function($scope) {
    $scope.doSomething = function() {    
        $scope.dialogVisible = true; 
    }

    $scope.dialogCallback = function(result) {
        if (result === 'OK') {
            // Process OK
        }
        else {
           // Process anything else
        }
    }
});

The second approach is awkward to write and it breaks the flow of the code. It's like trying to fit a square peg into a round hole.

IMO the DOM manipulation only happens in a directive statement is more like a (very) strong recommendation than a hard rule. It exists so people - especially newcomers to Angular - avoid accessing the DOM from within services and controllers.

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I had this exact same question when I needed to refactor our code allow for more dialogs in the application. We are using Angularjs 1.6 currently.

I found that you could put a directive into each template and then use ng-show and ng-hide for displaying/hiding the modal. However, while using directives for DOM manipulation is a convention in Angularjs, as already mentioned, in this use case a directive for modal windows creates a tight coupling between the controller and the modal directive.

Using a service in this use case is an acceptable deviation, because by using a service to inject the modal into the DOM, it is done as needed instead of the modal directive always being on the page, making this approach more dynamic and reduces the coupling with the template.

As another validation, I found that the Angular UI team uses this same approach with a modal service: $uibModal to create modal windows.

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