1

I´m moving from C# to C++ so forgive me if the question is basic or has some misconceptions...

I want to build my own exception to be used on my try/catch blocks. I need to report a custom exception code, a custom exception message and a custom exception source origin - I may have all or some of these parameters.

So I´ve built that class:

CommonException.hpp

namespace exceptionhelper
{

    class CommonException : public std::exception {

    public:
        CommonException();
        CommonException(std::string message);
        CommonException(std::string source, std::string message);
        CommonException(int code, std::string source, std::string message);
        virtual ~CommonException();
        const char *what() const throw();


    private:
        int exceptionCode;
        std::string exceptionSource;
        std::string exceptionMessage;
    };

}

And the implementation:

CommonException.cpp

namespace exceptionhelper {
        CommonException::CommonException() {
            exceptionCode = 0;
            exceptionMessage = "No message.";
            exceptionSource = "No source.";
        }
        CommonException::CommonException(std::string message) {
            exceptionCode = 0;
            exceptionMessage = message;
            exceptionSource = "No source.";
        }
        CommonException::CommonException(std::string source, std::string message) {
            exceptionCode = 0;
            exceptionMessage = message;
            exceptionSource = source;
        }
        CommonException::CommonException(int code, std::string source, std::string message) {
            exceptionCode = code;
            exceptionMessage = message;
            exceptionSource = source;
        }
        CommonException::~CommonException() {
        }
        const char *CommonException::what() const throw()
        {
            std::stringstream s;
            s << "Code    : " << exceptionCode << std::endl;
            s << "Source  : " << exceptionSource << std::endl;
            s << "Message : " << exceptionMessage << std::endl;
            return s.str().c_str();
        }
    }

And finally my implementation:

main ()
{
   try {
        ... code ...

        throw new CommonException(10, "here", "test exception");

   }
   catch (const std::exception &exc)
   {
            std::cerr << "Exception detected:" << std::endl;
            std::cerr << exc.what();
        }
        catch (...)
        {
            std::cerr << "Unknown exception called." << std::endl;
            throw;
        }
}

For some reason I´m getting this result:

Unknown exception called.
terminate called after throwing an instance of 'linuxcommon::exceptionhelper::CommonException*'
Aborted (core dumped)

Questions:

a) Why am I not catching my custom exception ? b) I´m pretty sure there are better ways to do this exception handling, but I cannot figure that out yet...

Thanks for helping...

  • 4
    new returns a pointer. You don't need to use it here. You hardly ever need to call new in C++. – juanchopanza Apr 27 '15 at 22:01
  • 2
    I.e. you're throwing a CommonException * and catching a std::exception &. One is a pointer, the other a reference. Climb out of the C# box and drink from the C++ fountain. Lose the new. Then fix the string problem Alex describes below. – WhozCraig Apr 27 '15 at 22:06
  • Well, well... I´m relly drinking from the C++ fountain, but my body seens to be refusing it... Removing the new solved the problem! Thanks for helping! – Mendes Apr 27 '15 at 22:17
  • 1
    return s.str().c_str(); is not right. You're returning a buffer associated with a temporary variable associated with a local stream. All of them are going away before the function returns. This error is called "RETURNING A DANGLING POINTER". – Ben Voigt Apr 27 '15 at 22:23
3

Some notes for your code.

  1. You may want to derive your exception class from std::runtime_error (instead of std::exception), since std::runtime_error already provides a constructor with an error message string. Of course you can add your own exception's data members to the derived class.

  2. You don't need to define a virtual destructor with an empty body for your exception class, since you don't have explicit cleanup code to execute. std::exception has a virtual destructor, and that will work just fine for your derived exception class.

  3. You can use a more idiomatic C++ syntax to initialize your exception data members in constructors, e.g. instead of:

CommonException::CommonException() {
    exceptionCode = 0;
    exceptionMessage = "No message.";
    exceptionSource = "No source.";
}

you can use:

CommonException::CommonException()
  : exceptionCode(0), 
    exceptionMessage("No message."), 
    exceptionSource("No source.")
{ }
  1. If you pass string parameters, you can still pass by value, but you may want to std::move() from the value to initialize data members, e.g. instead of:
CommonException::CommonException(std::string source, std::string message) {
    exceptionCode = 0;
    exceptionMessage = message;
    exceptionSource = source;
}

You can do:

CommonException::CommonException(std::string source, std::string message) 
    : exceptionCode(0),
      exceptionMessage(std::move(message)),
      exceptionSource(std::move(source))
{
}
  1. Consider making your single-string-argument constructor explicit, to prevent bogus implicit conversions from strings to exceptions:

    explicit CommonException(std::string message);
    
  2. In its current form, your what() method implementation can throw, because inserting operations (<<) on std::stringstream can throw:

const char *CommonException::what() const throw()
{
    std::stringstream s;
    s << "Code    : " + exceptionCode << std::endl;
    s << "Source  : " + exceptionSource << std::endl;
    s << "Message : " + exceptionMessage << std::endl;
    return s.str().c_str();
}

So, remove the throw() specification, making it simply:

const char* CommonException::what() const

(As a side note, the modern C++11 way of marking a method as non-throwing is using noexcept).

You may also want to simply use '\n' instead of std::endl to avoid premature pessimization.

Moreover, you are returning in this line a temporary string:

 return s.str().c_str();

The const char* pointer returned to the caller will just point to some garbage at the call site: this introduces a bug.

To fix that, you may want to consider adding a std::string data member, format the whole error message string inside that data member during exception object construction (i.e. in your constructors - you may also build a private helper method to do that, to avoid repeating code in each constructor), and just return m_str.c_str() from the what() method.

If you derive your exception class from std::runtime_error, you can just build the whole error message string at construction time, and pass that to std::runtime_error's constructor. In this case, std::runtime_error::what() will Do The Right Thing, and you won't need to override what() in your exception class.

E.g.

// Derive from std::runtime_error instead of std::exception
class CommonException : public std::runtime_error

...

CommonException::CommonException( /* your exception data */ )
    : std::runtime_error(BuildErrorMessage( /* your exception data */ )
{ }

// Private helper method
std::string CommonException::BuildErrorMessage( /* your exception data */ )
{
    // Build your exception message string here,
    // e.g. you can use std::ostringstream here,
    // and just call its str() method
    // to return the whole error message string.
    ...
}

At the exception's "client" side, you have:

  ... code ...

    throw new CommonException(10, "here", "test exception");

}
catch (const std::exception &exc)

Instead, consider throwing by value, instead of dynamically allocating the exception object on the heap, e.g. simply do:

throw CommonException( /* your exception data*/ );
  • i think taking in const ref to string ctor would be better – Sarang Apr 27 '15 at 22:25
  • @Sarang: In general, if you are observing an object that is not cheap to copy (like a std::string), using const reference would be fine. But in case of making a local copy (e.g. in a data member), passing by value and moving from the value is a better approach, considering C++11 move semantics. – Mr.C64 Apr 27 '15 at 22:37
  • Mr.C64, why the std::move ? – Mendes Apr 27 '15 at 22:40
  • @Mendez: You may want to search about techniques involving C++11 parameter passing. This thread on StackOverflow is a good starting point. – Mr.C64 Apr 27 '15 at 22:53
  • 1
    If you follow my suggestion and derive your exception class from std::runtime_error(), you don't need to override and reimplement what(). You should also remove throw() from both the declaration of the method (in the header file) and from the definition (in the .cpp file). Moreover, I think if you really want to override what(), assuming your error message was formatted in a std::string m_errorMsg data member, return m_errorMsg.c_str(); from what() should be fine. – Mr.C64 Apr 27 '15 at 23:27

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